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Ken Bulmer Dies

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  • Ken Bulmer Dies

    To keep the wolf from the door he found that writing comic-strip scripts for the old Amalgamated Press (still, then, the biggest fiction factory in the world) went a good deal of the way towards paying the bills, and during the late 1950s and early 1960s he pounded out "novel-length" war stories for War Picture Library as well as serials for weekly comics such as Lion and Valiant (at one stage he was writing the famous "The Steel Claw" for the latter paper). He was certainly in good company: other SF writers who bifurcated their talents, producing adventure-strip scripts for boys' papers one day and getting on with the current novel for adults the next, included Michael Moorcock, Mike Butterworth and his old friends Ted Tubb and Sid Bounds (who both found time to pen "Sexton Blake" thrillers, something Bulmer never quite managed - "Too much back-story in the character," he once told me: "if you got some minor detail wrong you'd get letters").
    Source: http://groups.google.com/group/alt.o...345345548bbbf9
    The cat spread its wings and flew high into the air, hovering to keep pace with them as they moved cautiously toward the city. Then, as they climbed over the rubble of what had once been a gateway and began to make their way through piles of weed-grown masonry, the cat flew to the squat building with the yellow dome upon its roof. It flew twice around the dome and then came back to settle on Jhary's shoulder. - The King of the Swords

  • #2
    This is what sci-fi.com wrote about him:

    U.K. SF Author Bulmer Is Dead

    British SF writer Kenneth Bulmer, who published scores of books under at least 22 pseudonyms, died on Dec. 16 following an extended illness, the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America Web site reported. He was 84.

    Bulmer was one of science fiction's most prolific writers, having published 165 novels and many short stories. His best know work is the Dray Prescott series, written as Alan Burt Akers, which comprised 52 novels, 15 of which were published only in German, the site reported.

    Bulmer was also active in U.K. science fiction fandom. He published the fanzines Star Pride, Parade, Juggernaut, Steam (with Pam Bulmer) and others and was president of British fandom's first amateur press association. In 1955 he was the first person selected by the Trans-Atlantic Fan Fund to travel to North America.

    In 1974 Bulmer was made a Life Member of the British Science Fiction Association.

    http://www.scifi.com/scifiwire/index.php?id=33781

    "With a deep, not-unhappy sigh, Elric prepared to do battle with an army." (Red Pearls)
    - Michael Moorcock

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    • #3
      Very sad Mike lost another friend.
      But hmmm ... I wonder how I'd feel going to one of my preferred fora and discovering they announce that another friend of mine has died.
      Not meant to criticize, yet ... probably the "Info-Age" we live in, huh? I would still prefer somebody giving me a call or writing me a letter.
      Google ergo sum

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      • #4
        I never know if Mike gets the word, and I don't know all who he knows! At least he heard it from friends rather than the obituary that I found it in. But I understand what you mean.
        The cat spread its wings and flew high into the air, hovering to keep pace with them as they moved cautiously toward the city. Then, as they climbed over the rubble of what had once been a gateway and began to make their way through piles of weed-grown masonry, the cat flew to the squat building with the yellow dome upon its roof. It flew twice around the dome and then came back to settle on Jhary's shoulder. - The King of the Swords

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        • #5
          Oh, crap. I loved Ken. One of the sweetest guys in the world. I got him and Ted Tubb into Fleetway quite early on. Ken was a great encourager of young talent, including mine, and had many words of wisdom for me when I was just starting. At least he made it to a reasonable age. He sort of disappeared into playing D&D in recent years, but I was in touch with him until relatively recently. Wonderful guy.

          Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in Europe:
          The Whispering Swarm: Book One of the Sanctuary of the White Friars - The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction
          Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles - Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - Modem Times 2.0 - The Sunday Books - The Sundered Worlds


          Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in the USA:
          The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction - The Sunday Books - Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles
          Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - The Sundered Worlds - The Winds of Limbo - Modem Times 2.0 - Elric: Swords and Roses

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