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Iain Banks, 1954-2013

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  • #31
    Neil Gaiman writes about Iain:

    http://journal.neilgaiman.com/2013/0...without-m.html

    At the end Neil writes a message to girls and guys like me who never read Iain:

    If you've never read any of his books, read one of his books. Then read another. Even the bad ones were good, and the good ones were astonishing.
    "From time to time I demonstrate the inconceivable, or mock the innocent, or give truth to liars, or shred the poses of virtue.(...) Now I am silent; this is my mood." From Sundrun's Garden, Jack Vance.
    "As the Greeks have created the Olympus based upon their own image and resemblance, we have created Gotham City and Metropolis and all these galaxies so similar to the corporate world, manipulative, ruthless and well paid, that conceived them." Braulio Tavares.

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    • #32
      I can only echo what others have said, Iain's novels were a seminal part of my 20s... he's given me many a happy hour... RIP
      forum

      1. a meeting or assembly for the open discussion of subjects of public interest
      2. a medium for open discussion, such as a magazine
      3. a public meeting place for open discussion

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      • #33
        BBC4 are repeating the 1996 adaptation of The Crow Road over the next four weeks, starting tonight at 10.30pm.
        _"For an eternity Allard was alone in an icy limbo where all the colours were bright and sharp and comfortless.
        _For another eternity Allard swam through seas without end, all green and cool and deep, where distorted creatures drifted, sometimes attacking him.
        _And then, at last, he had reached the real world – the world he had created, where he was God and could create or destroy whatever he wished.
        _He was supremely powerful. He told planets to destroy themselves, and they did. He created suns. Beautiful women flocked to be his. Of all men, he was the mightiest. Of all gods, he was the greatest."

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        • #34
          Banks poems to be published posthumously
          A first collection of poetry by Scottish author Iain Banks will be published in February 2015, a year and a half on from his death last June.

          Publisher Little, Brown said the book will also feature poems by his friend, fellow Scottish author Ken Macleod, who will edit the collection.

          The Wasp Factory author was 59 when he died, two months after announcing he had terminal gall bladder cancer.

          Banks' final novel The Quarry was published 11 days after his death.

          An announcement on his website on Sunday said the "much loved and admired author... would have celebrated his 60th birthday today."

          It said Little, Brown would publish the new poetry collection next February to coincide with his birth date.

          According to The Guardian, Banks had hoped to see his poems in print before his death.

          "I'm going to see if I can get a book of poetry published before I kick the bucket," he told the paper last May. "I've got about 50 I'm proud of."

          He also revealed he had been trying to involve Macleod in order to make the project "look more respectable".
          _"For an eternity Allard was alone in an icy limbo where all the colours were bright and sharp and comfortless.
          _For another eternity Allard swam through seas without end, all green and cool and deep, where distorted creatures drifted, sometimes attacking him.
          _And then, at last, he had reached the real world – the world he had created, where he was God and could create or destroy whatever he wished.
          _He was supremely powerful. He told planets to destroy themselves, and they did. He created suns. Beautiful women flocked to be his. Of all men, he was the mightiest. Of all gods, he was the greatest."

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          • #35
            Has anyone tried to explore the links between Bank's scifi novels and Mike's work in detail? I've just reread the entire Culture series and it seems to me there are clever references to Moorcock all over the place, from some very obvious ones like naming a chapter in 'State of the Art', 'The precise nature of the catastrophe', that whole chapter being set very much in a Jerry Cornelius themed world (and several short stories in that collection have very JC like art), to more subtle ones like a Ulver Seich in Excession referring to her human ancestors having passed through phases of people resembling 'birds, fish, dirigible balloons, snakes, small clouds of cohesive smoke and animated bushes' (which I think references Dancers at the end of time - there's a very similar passage in that). Some of the characters like Diziet Sma and Zakalwe also seem very Moorcockian in their omnivorous polysexuality and hedonism coupled with their adaptability and easy capability (Zakalwe even opens 'Use of weapons' dressed like a harlequin). Jerry would have loved drug glands.

            I'm now rereading The Algebraist and thinking how Luseferous sounds physically like he's trying to be Elric.

            Anyone spotted any others? Clearly Mr Banks was a Moorcock inspiree.

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            • #36
              To compliment 6 Music Celebrates Libraries there's another chance to hear Iain Banks sharing his favourite music and stories about his life in a 2011 interview from the Paperback Writers series on BBC 6 Music (via iPlayer):

              http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b017pncn
              Iain's wit and music takes us on a journey back to his colourful student days in Scotland, to squats in England and finally a serene life in the wilds of Scotland.
              _"For an eternity Allard was alone in an icy limbo where all the colours were bright and sharp and comfortless.
              _For another eternity Allard swam through seas without end, all green and cool and deep, where distorted creatures drifted, sometimes attacking him.
              _And then, at last, he had reached the real world – the world he had created, where he was God and could create or destroy whatever he wished.
              _He was supremely powerful. He told planets to destroy themselves, and they did. He created suns. Beautiful women flocked to be his. Of all men, he was the mightiest. Of all gods, he was the greatest."

              Comment

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