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Robert Howard

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  • Krieghetzer
    replied
    thanks. I just found it odd that they had those black boxes.

    Leave a comment:


  • Michael Moorcock
    replied
    These look like what we used to call printer's slugs. They are the English Grafton editions, done about twenty five years ago if memory serves,
    borrowing the covers of the DAW editions. I'll check out my file copies and see if those 'slugs' appear there, too. This is from when books were set in linotype and it's pre-computer setting. The black slugs were often
    there to separate type temporarily, but should have been removed before printing.
    Very strange.
    As I say, I'll check them out. But otherwise the NZ editions are just the UK editions reprinted (with extra slugs!).

    Leave a comment:


  • Krieghetzer
    replied
    They are published under Grafton Books ( A Division of Collins Publishing Groups).

    Here is the cover...


    and here are a few examples of what I mean...



    and



    As you can see, these black blocks aren't blurry letters... but actual squares. I was confused to see such things printed in a book.

    Leave a comment:


  • Michael Moorcock
    replied
    Sound like pirate copies. I'll happily swap you a better copy
    for one of those, so I can have a look at it.

    Leave a comment:


  • Krieghetzer
    replied
    Originally posted by Michael Moorcock
    Has it occurred to you, krieghetzer, that you're holding that NZ copy the wrong way up ?
    The NZ copies I have are nothing like copies I have from or have seen from other publishers. Where there should be a comma or a question mark, etc etc, there would be a black box, or something of the sort. Its asthough they used a font that doesn't have extended text of something.
    I should try and scan a page that has some of the wierd mistakes.

    Leave a comment:


  • Jerico
    replied
    I believe Joe is the author of Bubba Ho-Tep. The movie combining the talents of the writer, the director of Phantasm, and the lead actor of the Evil Dead movies.
    It's not too bad. Not the best thing I've ever seen but something I'd pick any day over your typical generic movie that's put out every week.

    He contributed to this horror anthology called Borderlands (White Wolf, woo hoo!). In particular he has this short little ditty called Love Doll: A Fable, which is brilliant in it's novelty. Only smarty-pants people like us can understand why. I highly suggest it if you want something original.

    here you go!...

    http://www.joerlansdale.com/todaysfeature.html

    --J

    Leave a comment:


  • Michael Moorcock
    replied
    Check out Joe Lansdale... He might suit you very well.
    A Texan who writes horror, who writes Westerns.... The
    real thing.
    The Masked Buckaroo is a character played by my character Maxim A. Pyat in the sequence that starts with Byzantium Endures. A bit later I started doing stories and now there is one comic and at least one story
    about him. Check out The Time Centre Times for the comic. There's also a website but I've lost the reference. Wherever stagecoach or
    prairie tramway is threatened -- here comes The Masked Buckaroo.
    Yes, well there are tram robbers in the old West too, you know....

    Leave a comment:


  • krunky
    replied
    Yeah, but "genre" fiction is still considered something less than "literature" even though some academics champion it. The part that makes me crazy is that people have no trouble recognizing the possible genius of Poe or Dickens even though as in Dickens case he was sometimes writing paid by the page. My point here is that commercial doesn't necessarily mean bad, although obviously it doesn't automatically make something a work of genius either.

    And yes, the film gets into Howard's troubles as a writer - not perhaps deeply, but it's there. It's been 4 years since I saw it, but I think one of the points made is that despite being critically relegated to the "pulp" format it was suggested that Howard was in his day one of the most widely read authors. This is no different than today when it must be accepted that no more how great a stage or film actor one might be, the most widely watched performances are those seen on the "lowly" television set.

    So Howard had the peculiar problems of being hugely popular while simultaneously being critically ignored, publically unknown (in that people wouldn't really have known his name they way they would later readily identify authors like Harold Robbins), and not very well paid.

    Leave a comment:


  • Grey Mouser
    replied
    Krunky - I was kind of disinclined towards the film when I first found out about it but after reading your description I'll give it a try if I ever find it. Howard was owed a lot of money by Wierd Tales at the time of his death so money troubles were in the mix too, and I think he may also have felt unappreciated as an author. I don't know if that was mentioned in the film.

    Mike - I have heard of The Masked Buckaroo but haven't read any of your stories about him yet. Is he like Zorro, a masked vigilante, 'cause I kind of like that stuff? Just ordered a credit card and will be tracking down some of your books that I haven't been able to get here in England like Skrayling Tree, and Tales From the Texas Woods is going on my list too.

    Guest (Krieghetzer?) perhaps you might try 'Gone to Texas' by Forrest Carter. Don't think it could be described as macabre though. It's the original book that Clint's Outlaw Josey Wales was based on. Here's a link on Amazon that also includes a sample from the book itself so you can get an idea if you like it or not:

    http://www.amazon.com/gp/reader/0826...74#reader-page

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Originally posted by Michael Moorcock
    Has it occurred to you, krieghetzer, that you're holding that NZ copy the wrong way up ?
    Nothing like the old ones...
    I've heard negative reports about that Howard film, but he was a natural, the way someone like Frederick Faust (Max Brand) was a natural. He
    could do almost any kind of story but as Brand specialised in Westerns, Howard specialised in fantasy. I, for what it's worth, also wrote a lot of Westerns in my early career and then, of course, there's The Masked Buckaroo, who first appeared in Tales from the Texas Woods.
    I meant my post as though I like The Westerns with Clint etc, the seem so macbre, etc. I was wondering if there were more macbre westerns namely in book format, I love to read.

    Leave a comment:


  • krunky
    replied
    I saw "The Whole Wide World" about 4 years ago and I really liked it. Vincent D'Onofrio and Renأ©e Zellweger were both quite good, esp. D'Onofrio as Howard.

    Maybe I don't know enough about the true story of the author to properly comment on the faithfulness of the film to the real deal - but I certainly felt that Howard was depicted as a passionate, intelligent, abundantly creative, yet ultimately troubled individual. From the little I understood about Howard's life prior to the movie, I thought they did a good job.

    The would-be girlfriend doesn't seem to paint herself the other-worldly saint either, she moved on when things with Howard seemed to be going nowhere. If she tarried even a little it was simply because she recognized his genius and waited to see if their was any chance the two of them might fulfill their mutual desire for one another. But it was not to be.

    I know the poor fellow ultimately takes his own life with a pistol, and this in close proximity to hearing some bad news about his already gravely ill mother. It would have been extremely easy to paint Howard as a stereotypical "momma's boy" but I think the movie succeeds in avoiding that possibility - Howard is somehow more complicated and it comes across that way. He's devoted by not a pansy.

    Oh sure, the movie makes some clumsy mistakes in fleshing out some of the background for the main characters, but what are they supposed to do just in case you are watching this movie and have somehow never heard of Conan the Barbarian? They have to do these stupid things, as a kind of necessary evil. Yes, you are led by the nose a little bit.

    I think the thing that gets under one's skin is that Howard seems to have made some very pointedly tragic choices (tragic to the outsider, that is). And I call them choices because it seems very clear that he had several opportunities to go down slightly different roads - sometimes he seemed to even take the first steps on those alternate paths and then decide against them for whatever inner reasons he may have had.

    And that's another thing I liked about the movie, I think it does allow you a glipse into the author's life but it doesn't pretend to know the whole truth about all of his motives. The viewer enters part way into the mystery, but the truth of it all was forever blocked when Howard took his own life and I think the film respects that fact. The suicide is presented somewhat matter-of-factly - it is neither glorified nor condemned, and that nicely contrasts with the dangerous sort of scene presented at the end of say "Romeo and Juliet." One gets really tired of the melodramatic depictions of suicide.

    It's an ugly business - shooting oneself in the head. I neither pitied him, nor fully understood what drove him to it. It was just Howard's own last exclamation point. The tragedy of Howard's suicide is something we feel as his audience all these many years later, what precisely he was thinking during the fateful moments in which he arrived at his choice is anyone's guess.

    His life was filled with seemingly tragic choice after tragic choice. We can only hope he knew what he was doing. I think it's disrespectful to second guess him either way. Obviously, part of what fascinates us now is the fact that his choices were non-standard - quite different from the sort of thing many of us choose for ourselves.

    All fled, all done,
    so lift me on the pyre:
    The feast is over,
    The lamps expire.

    Leave a comment:


  • Michael Moorcock
    replied
    Has it occurred to you, krieghetzer, that you're holding that NZ copy the wrong way up ?
    Nothing like the old ones...
    I've heard negative reports about that Howard film, but he was a natural, the way someone like Frederick Faust (Max Brand) was a natural. He
    could do almost any kind of story but as Brand specialised in Westerns, Howard specialised in fantasy. I, for what it's worth, also wrote a lot of Westerns in my early career and then, of course, there's The Masked Buckaroo, who first appeared in Tales from the Texas Woods.

    Leave a comment:


  • Grey Mouser
    replied
    I loved Howard's stuff. He wrote in westerns about Buckner J Grimes and Brekinridge Elkins. There's what looks to be a reasonably complete biography at this site:

    http://www.sonyclassics.com/www/misc/about.html

    The historical tales he wrote for Magic Carpet and Oriental Tales were great too. Look out for a book called Sowers of the Thunder which contains four of the best.

    Today I discovered there was a film made about him based on memoires written by a former girlfriend. Here's the link to the main page:

    http://www.sonyclassics.com/www/index.html

    Leave a comment:


  • Krieghetzer
    replied
    I heard that he wrote a few Westerns... any clue as to what they are? I love Spaghetti Westerns,haha. I also like Edgar Rice Burgoughs.

    Leave a comment:


  • VonWeiner
    replied
    He is one of my favorites. I have all of his stuff that I could find. Conan, Cormac Mac Art, Solomon Kane, Black Vulmea, Kull, Bran Mac Morn etc...
    Here is a thread on Conan:

    [broken link]

    I know I've mentioned other Howard books you can get. I have a bunch from BAEN publishers. Just can't find the post right now. Sorry. :?
    Last edited by Rothgo; 04-21-2010, 02:11 PM.

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