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Second Ether

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  • Second Ether

    Hey Mike,

    I can't remember if I'ave already asked this or not... but have you considered writing more Second Ether novels in the future? I know I've asked if we'll see Jack K. again and you said you didn't have anything inparticular planned but might bring him back. But will we see/hear anything about the second ether (not nessessarily a Jack K. story)?

    Thanos

    P.S. If there is anything about the second ether floating around out there, other than MMM, that I may not be aware of after reading the Blood Series: What and where is it? I plan on writing a Second Ether story for DGB and would love to be as accurate as possible.

  • #2
    Thanos:

    You might check out Mike's Tales from the Texas Woods. There are stories/passages/essays in this volume that relate to the Second Ether. The last chapter of my book (click the www button at the bottom) discusses Mike's career, Blood and the Second Ether against the backdrop of Chaos theory, computer modeling, and William Blake. There is also a chapter on game theory earlier in the book (Ch 2). You should be able to find it at most university libraries.

    I have another piece (very detailed) coming out later this year on shamanism, Blake and the Second Ether. I'll post details as I learn more.

    Cheers,

    Carter

    Comment


    • #3
      I'm fond of those characters, but, as you've doubtless spotted, I'm inclined not to overstretch a series once it seems to have come to a natural ending. For similar reasons I haven't written any Dancers at the End of Time or Bastable stories, though I'm sure I have a few more Seaton Begg, Metatemporal Investigator, stories up my sleeve -- building on what I've done elsewhere. I read a very interesting piece on the Second Ether (mostly) and postmodernism earlier this week, which also had some interesting things to say and also tended to emphasise why I don't write series ad infinitum. The ideas are ongoing and tend to lead to other ideas. Mind you, if Jack strolled back into my writing life I wouldn't be too unhappy. But I can't see that's the direction I'm going in at the moment, which seems to be increasingly towards 'realism', though always on the basis of what has gone before.

      Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in Europe:
      The Whispering Swarm: Book One of the Sanctuary of the White Friars - The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction
      Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles - Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - Modem Times 2.0 - The Sunday Books - The Sundered Worlds


      Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in the USA:
      The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction - The Sunday Books - Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles
      Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - The Sundered Worlds - The Winds of Limbo - Modem Times 2.0 - Elric: Swords and Roses

      Comment


      • #4
        For what my opinions are worth, the second ether trilogy may be my favorite MM series. As much as I love and respect the second ether, I think it would detract from the series' power to write any more. Everything seems a little weak after an exclamation point. I'm not sure that even Jack would have anything more interesting to say after his last "I'm feeling it Sam."

        Thanos- I am interested in what someone other than MM would write about it, though. Any hints you can drop us?

        By the way, Mike, I suspect I read the same essay. Thanks for that.

        Comment


        • #5
          You chaps mind pointing us to this essay?
          The cat spread its wings and flew high into the air, hovering to keep pace with them as they moved cautiously toward the city. Then, as they climbed over the rubble of what had once been a gateway and began to make their way through piles of weed-grown masonry, the cat flew to the squat building with the yellow dome upon its roof. It flew twice around the dome and then came back to settle on Jhary's shoulder. - The King of the Swords

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          • #6
            I wrote a small essay for Studies in Fantasy Literature about MM and postmodernism that will come out in a couple of weeks. When the copyright issues are established, I'll send the link.

            Comment


            • #7
              Oops. I guess that was pretty presumptuous of me. I sent a copy to MM, and just assumed he was talking about the one I sent.... :oops:

              Comment


              • #8
                It's okay, Doc. Yours was the one I was talking about! You didn't put your return address on your note, though! Maybe Linda has it.

                Comment


                • #9
                  My take on the Second Ether

                  Well as I said, I'd like to remain as true to Mike's vision as is humanly possible. But I also want to have a good dose of originality as well. If I just rewrite what Mike wrote, what's the point?

                  The basic idea that I have is that my character, Daemont D’Marques (Duke of an as yet undecided Duchy in Medieval France) randomly finds himself transported back and forth between his Earth and the Second Ether and each time he returns he finds himself many years in the future. The way I write (which is also the way I view Mike’s work) is very much focused on the development of the main character. So I will be stressing the effect that his travels have on him as a person quite a bit. He will experience not only the Second Ether but also many of the different ages of the Earth. If you look at his time in the Second Ether as a sort of stasis you’ll see that it is very similar to Jerry Cornelius’s periods of “inactivity.� When in the Second Ether he will be something of an outsider, an anomaly, viewed as someone unimportant and irrelevant. Thus he will have few, if any, encounters with Now The Clouds Have Meaning and other formerly important vassals. It is all about internal struggle and the preservation of the self rather than the all.

                  I hope this teaser has peaked your interest Doc. I’m working on it right now. But I won’t post it until I have it all planned out.

                  Thanos

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Thanos- you certainly have peaked my interest. It reminds me a little of Bastable (I mean that in a good way).

                    I must be like you in that I enjoy seeing characters grow and change. I think authors make some of the most powerful statements through subtle character developments.

                    I also think an author is much more clever when he or she moves a plot through characters as well as events. Anyone can string together a narrative that tells a reader what is happening, but I find it much more rewarding when I discover what is really happening through seeing characters differently at different points in a story. Maybe that's why I'm stuck on Jack's last "I'm feeling it, Sam," because I know he hasn't changed, which makes him interesting.

                    For what it's worth, one of the points I make in that essay is that storytelling at the margins-- which I find characterizes the entire second ether sequence-- is a much more powerful type of storytelling that conventional linear narratives, because it makes readers remain actively engaged with material and ideas, rather than allowing them to be passive receivers of messages. I think that you're in touch with similar ideas because of what you want your characters to do.

                    I'm looking forward to your story.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Bastable

                      Oddly enough the similarity with Bastable didn't strike me until you mentioned it. I greatly enjoyed the Bastable stories but I find that as an EC I don't remember him as easily as say Von Bek, Jack, Jerry or Elric.

                      The funny thing is that Daemont's personality is completely based off my personal/favorite traits but he is also very similar to Ulric, Jack, Jerry, Elric (etc) unintentionally. This probably reflects the fact that Mike's stories have changed me as a person and consequentially my writing has changed as well. I anticipate the product to be very Moorcockesque. I only hope that I can throw in a few surprises as well.

                      As for character development over time I’ve always used superman as an example. Superman fans would probably argue this to the death… but Superman never felt like a real person to me. It seems like every Superman cartoon or comic that I’ve seen shows him doing what he does best: using his abilities to thwart evil etc. But does Superman ever change? Does he ever learn a new lesson or change his ways? In that since he always seemed very static to me. Where as characters should be living things in my eyes… they should progress and regress in turn, like we all do.

                      I haven’t decided if I’m going to write the story as one long epic or many short stories (I’ve always been fond of epics but short stories might be a better medium). But what you can expect to see from the work as a whole is the constant growth of the character from chapter to chapter. Who knows, by the end he might be an entirely different character altogether.

                      Thanos

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Funny you should say that about Superman. I also felt he was never a real person. I felt that Captain Marvel, his greatest rival when I was growing up, was a much more 'human' character and that's why I always preferred him. I was very upset when Fawcett cancelled the series but very glad when DC revived him -- and now preserve him in those admittedly expensive but great Archive editions!

                        Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in Europe:
                        The Whispering Swarm: Book One of the Sanctuary of the White Friars - The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction
                        Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles - Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - Modem Times 2.0 - The Sunday Books - The Sundered Worlds


                        Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in the USA:
                        The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction - The Sunday Books - Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles
                        Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - The Sundered Worlds - The Winds of Limbo - Modem Times 2.0 - Elric: Swords and Roses

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          The only appearance of Superman I can think of where he appears more real is in the graphic novel Kingdom Come. Excelent work in general and in the first third or so Superman almost seems like a real person with real problems.
                          "In omnibus requiem quaesivi, et nusquam inveni nisi in angulo cum libro"
                          --Thomas a Kempis

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I prefer to Spiderman to Superman because he's got an old auntie he has to worry about.
                            The cat spread its wings and flew high into the air, hovering to keep pace with them as they moved cautiously toward the city. Then, as they climbed over the rubble of what had once been a gateway and began to make their way through piles of weed-grown masonry, the cat flew to the squat building with the yellow dome upon its roof. It flew twice around the dome and then came back to settle on Jhary's shoulder. - The King of the Swords

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              That's what Spiderman brought back into comics, I think, and why he was so enormously popular from the beginning. I liked Captain Marvel because he could be duped, wasn't always right, was shown scratching his head in puzzlement and so on. A less sophisticated version of Spiderman. Alan Moore then took the whole thing a further stage while ultimately giving us the 'Science Hero' Tom Strong, actually returning the comic strip hero to his old 'innocence' while retaining much of the humanity he had contributed to his super-hero stories. Of course, I'm not plugging Tom Strong just because I'm currently writing a Tom Strong story. :) But I've asked the artist if he can give the story a C.C.Beck (Cap's creator) feel to it, in tribute to the only comic book hero (apart from Captain Marvel Junior, drawn by the remarkable Mac Reboy) I
                              ever really loved!

                              Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in Europe:
                              The Whispering Swarm: Book One of the Sanctuary of the White Friars - The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction
                              Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles - Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - Modem Times 2.0 - The Sunday Books - The Sundered Worlds


                              Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in the USA:
                              The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction - The Sunday Books - Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles
                              Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - The Sundered Worlds - The Winds of Limbo - Modem Times 2.0 - Elric: Swords and Roses

                              Comment

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