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Sweden and the translations!?..

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  • Bill
    replied
    I know; I am kidding.

    Leave a comment:


  • Theocrat
    replied
    Originally posted by Bill

    huh? where's this, now?

    :lol:
    Hold on to your pants Bill! I was just generalizing the whole thing.
    I think it's just a pathetic community!

    Leave a comment:


  • Bill
    replied
    "Ahh... Now i remember! I hardly discuss anything there anymore. Everybody is just into getting laid or speak nonsense. "

    huh? where's this, now?

    :lol:

    Leave a comment:


  • Theocrat
    replied
    [quote="Rymdolov"]
    Originally posted by Michael Moorcock
    Gloriana might be a good novel to start with. It's a one-shot, a bit of a classic within the genre and it hasn't been published in Swedish before. The only problem I have with it is that I have not yet read it. :oops: It's at the top of my reading list, though.

    Theocrat: You found me on lunarstorm. Same nick-name.
    Ahh... Now i remember! I hardly discuss anything there anymore. Everybody is just into getting laid or speak nonsense.

    Hey... I haven't read Gloriana yet either so you can relax a moment..
    I have some Fritz Leiber to catch up on first. Some good old "S & S"! :)

    It's just that.. alot of my friends who read sci-fi/fantasy casually don't read the english versions.. and there are alot of casual readers out there.
    And not to forget the kids.. Where (as you know) on lunarstorm they are storming through series after series, wanting to know the next best thing!
    Would be ashamed (as i've already said) to leave some of the best known SF and Fantasy works by our Host here!

    Leave a comment:


  • Rymdolov
    replied
    Originally posted by Michael Moorcock
    I think if the Dutch can do an edition of Gloriana, then maybe the Swedes could now ? Seems a shame not to!
    Exactly. How much of a culturally backward country do we want Sweden to be?

    Sometimes I get the impression that the Swedish intelligentsia has resigned and is now just waiting for Swedish to become extinct. Or maybe they just think that people who are too young or uneducated not to know English don't deserve to read good books anyway. Please note, though, that I have no idea what I'm talking about and that I wouldn't be able to point out one of "them" if they bit my nose.

    The "small market" argument is partially valid, I think, but it shouldn't be impossible as long as your aim is not to make big money (or any money at all). Basically, the problem is that you need a lot of money to start with. But right-wing people are always complaining that the swedish government is spending too much tax-money on culture, so maybe it's time to start exploring those possiblities. The EU sometimes supports translations between two EU languages and since a translation of a 300 pg book would cost around 32000 (unless the figures I got from the translator or my calculating abilities deceive me), it might cover a quite large portion of the costs. Those of you who are Swedish have probably heard of that mythical concept "starta-egetbidrag".

    As a last resort, it might also be possible to actually start saving some money... :D

    Gloriana might be a good novel to start with. It's a one-shot, a bit of a classic within the genre and it hasn't been published in Swedish before. The only problem I have with it is that I have not yet read it. :oops: It's at the top of my reading list, though.

    Theocrat: You found me on lunarstorm. Same nick-name.

    Leave a comment:


  • Michael Moorcock
    replied
    Publishers used to argue that since so many Swedes already spoke English (which makes it hard to learn Swedish if you're living in
    Upsala, for instance!) there was no point in translating most books into Swedish! I remember this also was the argument for not translating into Dutch. Essentially they are relatively small markets, whereas French and German, for instance, are not. I'm not sure this argument holds any longer since I'm being translated into Hebrew, Estonian, Latvian, Serbian and Croatian, as well as Russian, Polish, Greek, Japanese, Portugese and so on! I think if the Dutch can do an edition of Gloriana, then maybe the Swedes could now ? Seems a shame not to!

    Leave a comment:


  • Theocrat
    replied
    Originally posted by Michael Moorcock
    I know. I felt like a bizarre superhero -- entirely made up of mosquitoes -- while up beyond Kiruna. They bit through every kind of clothing I had. I only climbed Pjortafjellet (sp ?) because it was so high the mosquitoes couldn't follow. Forgive my Swedish spelling. I didn't learn from reading but listening.
    Yeah! It seems that the more north you come in sweden the bigger the flies! An odd paradox. I remember fishing around those parts, and my brother laughed his ass of when i made a hole in a big plastic bag and put my head in it. He got hysterical but so was i when the mosquitos where like flying Syringe's. They are the scourge of swedish summer! There was a region not far from where i live. Which had so many mosquitos that you couldn't go outside and work/play or even breath. I believe one person there filled a plastic bag or bucket up to the brim with these things!

    It's spelled Portafjأ¤llet. :)
    Hey it's no big deal.. I can speak fluent english after living in singapore as a kid. And i still have to look up some words and spelling in the online oxford dictionary.. :)

    Leave a comment:


  • Michael Moorcock
    replied
    I know. I felt like a bizarre superhero -- entirely made up of mosquitoes -- while up beyond Kiruna. They bit through every kind of clothing I had. I only climbed Pjortafjellet (sp ?) because it was so high the mosquitoes couldn't follow. Forgive my Swedish spelling. I didn't learn from reading but listening.

    Leave a comment:


  • Theocrat
    replied
    Originally posted by Michael Moorcock
    Lars came to my house in Yorkshire once to film me in a documentary he was doing about airships. My argument was that airships had successfully taken over from heavier than air flight and that giant jets were really just a myth.
    Was it what filmmakers usually call it! A 'mock-u-mentary'? :)

    Our northern regions here in sweden are very beautiful indeed. But it's also filled with mosquitos. I think i'd like to see Bavaria and the Alps some day.

    Leave a comment:


  • Theocrat
    replied
    Originally posted by Rymdolov
    Originally posted by Theocrat
    Thanks Rymdolov! Eller tack! Kanske? :)
    Varsأ¥god. Ingen orsak. Tack sjأ¤lv fأ¶r att du visade mig till den hأ¤r sidan. أ–versأ¤ttaren finns pأ¥ samma community dأ¤r du hittade mig, fأ¶rresten, om du vill se vad han skriver med egna أ¶gon.

    It would be impolite to converse in Swedish only, though... :)
    Vilken Community var det? Erhm.. What community?

    Leave a comment:


  • Michael Moorcock
    replied
    I originally went to Sweden to visit my friend Lars Helander, who became a documentary-maker for Swedish TV. Another good friend was Mai Zetterling, who made some good films with the Svenskfilminstitut in the 60s. I stayed most of the time in Upsala, but I also travelled in the north, going to Kiruna and beyond and eventually climhing in the mountains of the border. Wandered onto the Russian Finnish border when following reindeer path once. Had a wonderful time in what must be one of the most remote parts of Europe. I earned most of my money playing guitar and singing blues. Lars came to my house in Yorkshire once to film me in a documentary he was doing about airships. My argument was that airships had successfully taken over from heavier than air flight and that giant jets were really just a myth.

    Leave a comment:


  • Rymdolov
    replied
    Originally posted by Theocrat
    Thanks Rymdolov! Eller tack! Kanske? :)
    Varsأ¥god. Ingen orsak. Tack sjأ¤lv fأ¶r att du visade mig till den hأ¤r sidan. أ–versأ¤ttaren finns pأ¥ samma community dأ¤r du hittade mig, fأ¶rresten, om du vill se vad han skriver med egna أ¶gon.

    It would be impolite to converse in Swedish only, though... :)

    Leave a comment:


  • Rymdolov
    replied
    It turns out that the translator was actually working at Target Games at the time of the first Swedish edition of the Elric books. He claims to understand any criticism of those editions. Apparently they were brought out by six different translators (for six books!) and, of the two editors in charge of "Drakar & Demonerserien", one was not very interested and the other didn't have enough knowledge. None of the translators were paid very much either...

    Darren: There are always expressions with no exact match, I think. What makes English so interesting (and sometimes frustrating) is the fact that there are so many words in it. I think that a extensive English dictionary contains approximately three times as many words as a Swedish one. This, of course, has to do with England having been invaded so many times (Romans, Anglo-Saxons, Vikings, Normands) and also to some extent the British Empire (I guess). Swedish has been heavily influenced by German, French, Romani and English, but it seems that in Swedish there has been a tendency to replace old words rather than just adding a new bunch.

    Leave a comment:


  • Theocrat
    replied
    Originally posted by Michael Moorcock
    I hadn't mentioned that it's a bit of an irony, really, that some of the Elric saga was actually written in Sweden, when I was living in Uppsala!
    Yep! Something has to be done about this already.. It seems everyone here in the forum, who's from sweden, is already putting out their feelers.

    I never heard you explain why you stayed here in Sweden, Uppsala?
    And i take great pride in that you also took some time to stay here aswell.

    BTW! Did you ever taste our most infamous dish 'Surstrأ¶mming'= Sour herring, or rather 'fermented herring'? Which everyone here in sweden seems to pass on to foreigners whenever they get the chance. :/

    Leave a comment:


  • Darren
    replied
    swedes, aren't they vegetables?

    I once knew a woman whose husband worked in a Swedish Video Library in Camdahn Tahn. The strangest thing is, I went for the same job before I met her!

    I never got the job. It seemed unusual they should be making copies of our television programmes. Something must be wrong.

    She had videoes of Barbarella and If.

    But I did have a penpal from Finland who said she would introduce me to her Sami friend. I lost touch with her through the vissicitudes of my vita memoria. She was a Cartoonist and told me stuff about the lady writer who wrote the Moomins.

    I wonder how many words there are in Swedish and that perhaps the georgeous richness of the English Language has phrases which can't be adequately expressed? It doesn't seem to happen the other way, English people having Swedish as a second language.

    :roll:

    Leave a comment:

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