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Mike: Your Take on "Children of Men"?

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  • Mike: Your Take on "Children of Men"?

    Mike, I was wondering what you thought of "Children of Men" since you guys had gone to see it the other evening.

    I loved the film, as it had me on the edge of my seat unlike many, many films in recent years. I thought the action sequences masterfully choreographed.

    I enjoyed the detail of the film (I got so much out of reading the newspapers pasted to the walls where Theo first interacts {in the film, that is} with Julianne Moore's character, such as the Russian nuclear attack on Kazhakstan).

    I loved the character "Jasper" and really found an empathetic bond with the old fellow.

    What knocked my socks off was the scene overlaid by King Crimson's "Court of the Crimson King;" it absolutely took me by surprise to see that Fripp let one of his masterpieces grace a film. Then, the icing on the cake was the inflatable porcine over the bleak urban landscape, and it made it seem like you were looking out the windows of the Birmingham dry ice factory on the cover of Pink Floyd's "Animals" [do forgive me if I have the building itself incorrectly identified].

    It was not a perfect film, and certainly not an uplifting one, but I really enjoy films that take me out of my own little world and immerse me in another universe or timeline, and does not throw my own mundane problems into sharper relief as do most character-driven films set in our own time and society.

    You can bet your boots that I will be in line for the very first showing of ANY film produced from your own works. Maybe this director would be good for a film version of Elric's heartbreaking saga, n'est ce pas?
    "My candle's burning at both ends, it will not last the night;
    But ah my foes and oh, my friends, it gives a lovely light" - Edna St Vincent Millay

  • #2
    Originally posted by Perssonicus
    it made it seem like you were looking out the windows of the Birmingham dry ice factory on the cover of Pink Floyd's "Animals" [do forgive me if I have the building itself incorrectly identified].
    It's Battersea Power Station, not that I'm pedantic or anything

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    • #3
      Yep, good old Battersea Power Station. It was wonderful inside -- full of great art deco of the period when it was built. Isn't it an art gallery now, extension of the Tate ? I haven't seen it in that incarnation. Not far from there we had our publicity photographs taken at the remains of Battersea Fun Fair for the New Worlds Fair album.
      I'm afraid I was underwhelmed by Children of Men, as I've said on another thread here. My favourite picture of recent times is The Illusionist. For me the movie was generic 'fascist Britain' stuff which didn't offer me anything new. We used to get accused of 'pessimism' when we ran this sort of story in NW forty years ago...
      I still think Brian Aldiss's Greybeard, on the same theme, is a far better story and far more original treatment of the theme. I think Greybeard was published in 1964.
      Maybe I was hoping for more from the CoM movie, having disliked the book so much. I appear to be mostly alone in not liking the movie much.

      Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in Europe:
      The Whispering Swarm: Book One of the Sanctuary of the White Friars - The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction
      Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles - Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - Modem Times 2.0 - The Sunday Books - The Sundered Worlds


      Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in the USA:
      The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction - The Sunday Books - Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles
      Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - The Sundered Worlds - The Winds of Limbo - Modem Times 2.0 - Elric: Swords and Roses

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Michael Moorcock
        Yep, good old Battersea Power Station. It was wonderful inside -- full of great art deco of the period when it was built. Isn't it an art gallery now, extension of the Tate ?
        That's Bankside which was also designed by Giles Gilbert Scott. I'm not sure what's happening with Battersea Power Station: I know somebody has bought it, but the last time I went past on the train, it had obviously been gutted and there were large holes in a couple of the walls. It's a real shame because, as you say, it was a beautiful building and one of my favourite London landmarks.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by johneffay
          It's Battersea Power Station, not that I'm pedantic or anything
          That's where they have the Tate Modern right? I've been there a few times - some really interesting exhibits - though they never seemed to be there for more than a couple weeks at a time.

          Some of the video art they showed was really well done, although a few pieces were a little perverse - there was one 70's piece "Rocky" in which a naked skinny man in a rubber mask smears chocolate sauce all over himself and then proceeds to beat himself up with the boxing gloves he is wearing. I never quite figured that one out.
          Batman: It's a low neighborhood, full of rumpots. They're used to curious sights, which they attribute to alcoholic delusions.

          Robin: Gosh, drink is sure a filthy thing, isn't it? I'd rather be dead than unable to trust my own eyes!

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by devilchicken
            That's where they have the Tate Modern right?
            As I said above, that's Bankside which was a smaller power station than Battersea, but designed by the same bloke.

            The Tate Modern is a top place because even if the art isn't all that great in some of the galleries, it's still a nice building to wander around in. The cafe at the top is really good as well because it gives you a great view of London over the Thames.

            Comment


            • #7
              Thanks so much for setting me straight on the identity of the building.

              Was this the same building in the Pink Floyd "Animals" cover, or was the floating pig the only Easter Egg?

              And thanks, Mike, for your feedback on the film. I'm now interested in finding the books you mentioned. I thought the "fascist Britain" bit a tad overdone as well, but still quite enjoyed the movie (so much that I've just gotten back from my second viewing).

              Best to You and Yours...and thanks, as ever, for your works.

              [P.S.: I'll post this observation in the correct thread as well, but I thought that the actor who plays Theo's cousin (the one playing air guitar to "Court of the Crimson King") had the PERFECT face for Yrkoon...]
              Last edited by Perssonicus; 01-15-2007, 02:31 PM.
              "My candle's burning at both ends, it will not last the night;
              But ah my foes and oh, my friends, it gives a lovely light" - Edna St Vincent Millay

              Comment


              • #8
                I'm all for the mood and 'palette' chosen by the director and would love to see something similar for the Elric movie. I suspect this might not happen. But it would be good to produce the first heroic fantasy noir... In a sense that would be closer to Elric's roots, too.

                Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in Europe:
                The Whispering Swarm: Book One of the Sanctuary of the White Friars - The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction
                Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles - Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - Modem Times 2.0 - The Sunday Books - The Sundered Worlds


                Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in the USA:
                The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction - The Sunday Books - Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles
                Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - The Sundered Worlds - The Winds of Limbo - Modem Times 2.0 - Elric: Swords and Roses

                Comment


                • #9
                  Then maybe the fellow who directed CoM would be a good choice to direct Elric.....and I also thought that the look and feel of the film would be a wonderful treatment for the Elric saga, similar to the "Batman Begins" feel.

                  I trust the Elric film treatment will be stunning. Glad to see it's still in the works!
                  "My candle's burning at both ends, it will not last the night;
                  But ah my foes and oh, my friends, it gives a lovely light" - Edna St Vincent Millay

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Wouldn't be a bad idea. The guy's done some varied work.
                    Saw Casanova with Heath Ledger (no, no -- saw it with him in) today. Rather like a Restoration comedy. Not as bad as I was afraid it would be, though not a patch on Depp's Libertine.
                    Little Miss Sunshine was okay, too. I didn't think it was as good as I'd been led to expect, but it was enjoyable.
                    Hoping to get to Pan's Labyrinth soon.

                    Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in Europe:
                    The Whispering Swarm: Book One of the Sanctuary of the White Friars - The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction
                    Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles - Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - Modem Times 2.0 - The Sunday Books - The Sundered Worlds


                    Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in the USA:
                    The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction - The Sunday Books - Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles
                    Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - The Sundered Worlds - The Winds of Limbo - Modem Times 2.0 - Elric: Swords and Roses

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I liked The Libertine, at least as much as there was in there to like - little about it was uplifting as much as generally repellant ;). The biggest draw for me was Johnny Depp's performance which is much more in keeping with the stuff he did before he hit the big time.

                      The wife and I caught Pan's Labyrinth this afternoon - liked it a lot.
                      Batman: It's a low neighborhood, full of rumpots. They're used to curious sights, which they attribute to alcoholic delusions.

                      Robin: Gosh, drink is sure a filthy thing, isn't it? I'd rather be dead than unable to trust my own eyes!

                      Comment

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