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Mike's favourite recipies

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  • Mike's favourite recipies

    Mike, wondered if you had some favourite dishes you particularly enjoy or recipies you would like to share.

    This morning, I just rediscovered Egg Florentine.. Isnt it delicious?


    Last night I dreamt I spent an evening drinking Whisky and chatting with Peter O,Toole, been watching all his movies recently.
    I wonder if he might have made a great J.C.?

  • #2
    I wonder if he might have made a great J.C.?
    He did...well, sort of...

    See The Ruling Class.

    Comment


    • #3
      Linda likes her eggs fancy. By and large, I like mine pretty plain, though there's a Turkish egg dish whose name I forget which is a kind of brik and absolutely delicious... In a recipe book done years ago I gave them a recipe for Lettuce Soup. I absolutely hate the taste of lettuce while liking pretty much all other greens, but I don't mind it as soup... I have a lot of faves, though, from very simple dishes to pretty complicated ones, though I don't like a lot of American food which seems intended to disguise the taste of the ingredients rather than bringing them all out. Probably why I like living in France so much. I have my own recipe for baked beans on toast (v. English 'nursery' dish) but used to be much called on for my omelettes and discovered early on that you can get a great reputation as a cook if you just buy very good ingredients. I have a fondness for offal which has almost disappeared from most American menus, with the exception of calf liver.
      I love ris de veau, kidneys and I think my favourite dish cooked by me is stuffed sheep's hearts and carrots. Indeed, so famous was I for this dish that I came by the name of Sheepheart north of the border... I'm a sentimental vegetarian. That means I don't eat animals I like and classify as vegetables animals I don't like, such as sheep. Sadly, I won't buy bacon or any other part of the pig (an animal I like a lot) but eat it if someone else takes the moral responsibility... I won't eat squid or a number of other animals I suspect are actually smarter than us.

      Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in Europe:
      The Whispering Swarm: Book One of the Sanctuary of the White Friars - The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction
      Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles - Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - Modem Times 2.0 - The Sunday Books - The Sundered Worlds


      Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in the USA:
      The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction - The Sunday Books - Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles
      Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - The Sundered Worlds - The Winds of Limbo - Modem Times 2.0 - Elric: Swords and Roses

      Comment


      • #4
        Had some rocquette (rocket?) soup a few years back and it was brilliant. Never been able to find it being served since

        With regard to eating animals that are smarter than us, would that apply to ants en masse? I have always thought that ants were our greatest threat, their societies being the exact opposite of humanity's in as such that the more of them that get together, the smarter they become. Human beings on the other hand....

        They would also have few compunctions about eating us....
        Does it follow that I reject all authority? Perish the thought. In the matter of boots, I defer to the authority of the boot-maker.
        Bakunin

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        • #5
          Well, anyone who's had a picnic in England has probably eaten a few ants, so it would only be fair.
          I've REALLY admired them since I found a nest in my Newgate Calendar and tried not to disturb them. However, they took fright and I watched the ants doing everything they could to save their eggs. I couldn't help admiring them and did all I could to help them make a move that lost as few of their numbers as possible. I'm still inclined to dissuade ants from making colonies nearby. One thing I do is to move scouts and confuse them if they come into the house, hoping they'll send a message that there's nothing worth having indoors...
          OK. OK. This could be anthropormorphism. I try to avoid that. But they are smart, I'll agree. Presumably, however, we'll never work out a way of living with them in peaceful coexistence...

          Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in Europe:
          The Whispering Swarm: Book One of the Sanctuary of the White Friars - The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction
          Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles - Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - Modem Times 2.0 - The Sunday Books - The Sundered Worlds


          Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in the USA:
          The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction - The Sunday Books - Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles
          Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - The Sundered Worlds - The Winds of Limbo - Modem Times 2.0 - Elric: Swords and Roses

          Comment


          • #6
            As is typical of Australian fauna, the ones you get down here are savage in the extreme. One of my clearest memories of my childhood involved a bullant biting a piece out of a plastic toy boat I was playing with at the time in a neighbour's driveway (obviously I was preparing for the drought I knew was coming).

            As I was only about 3 or 4 at the time I have remained traumatized for life. And the bastards outnumber us millions to one....

            I agree with you on the pigs and squids though. And cats. And dogs (well most dogs - there's a couple of Pomeranians at the moment I would happily put between a bun and sauce). And definately the sheep have to go!
            Does it follow that I reject all authority? Perish the thought. In the matter of boots, I defer to the authority of the boot-maker.
            Bakunin

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Michael Moorcock
              I'm a sentimental vegetarian. That means I don't eat animals I like and classify as vegetables animals I don't like, such as sheep. Sadly, I won't buy bacon or any other part of the pig (an animal I like a lot) but eat it if someone else takes the moral responsibility... I won't eat squid or a number of other animals I suspect are actually smarter than us.
              Hmmm... Beef and mutton as vegetables...

              Jeff Vandermeer probably appreciates your take on squid.

              Apparently pigs are far smarter than dogs, which makes me question how we wound up domesticating them for food. (I'm not suggesting we should domesticate dogs for food, BTW--especially scotties, L'E ) However, I doubt that pigs are smarter than cats. Everyone knows cats would run the world if they had opposable thumbs.

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              • #8
                I think Conner has the opposable thumb, Doc
                By the way I have to bring Mike to taste my mom's recipes. No rabbit ( too much similar cats ).
                Unfortunately some of the best italian dishes are based on pigs, but I'm an hypocrite in this, I love every animals but I eat them...I'd have no courage to kill no one of them, squids, pigs, sheep, cow ora chicken, but I eat them...I know, I'm an hypocrite...
                howevere there ara here a lot of vegetarian recipes... like "focaccia al formaggio"
                http://www.reccoonline.it/focaccia.htm
                Hieronymus

                - Dalmatius -

                "I'm forbidden to reign, but I'll never yield before the facts: I am the Cat"

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                • #9
                  Pigs, aside, you wouldn't see me turn down a nice Italian veal escaloppe, much as I disapprove of what they do to calves... I'm a total hypocrite. But I think some people are natural vegetarians as others are natural meat-eaters. My daughters were born a year apart and one was naturally vegetarian while the other ate a vast amount of meat.
                  We discovered a great 'posh' Italian restaurant in London a couple of years or so ago which is our favourite. We love good Italian food and wine. Unfortunately, by the time it turns into The Olive Garden versions, it's pretty far removed from real Italian food. One of the good things about both New York and San Francisco is that there are enough Italians living there to keep the standards high. One of the best meals we ever ate in the States was at a small-ish Italian restaurant in N. California countryside.

                  Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in Europe:
                  The Whispering Swarm: Book One of the Sanctuary of the White Friars - The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction
                  Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles - Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - Modem Times 2.0 - The Sunday Books - The Sundered Worlds


                  Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in the USA:
                  The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction - The Sunday Books - Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles
                  Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - The Sundered Worlds - The Winds of Limbo - Modem Times 2.0 - Elric: Swords and Roses

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    There is one of most good italian dish: the rosted pork ( a pig three months old ). I know, it's terribile. I'm very sad for him, but it's really good. He is roasted on the fire with only salt.
                    It's typical of Sardinia.
                    Basically our recipies are all based on meat or fish not only pasta, it's difficult to be vegetarian here ( as Leithe our friend in Babel section ) but there are many dishes based on vegetables like "torta pasqualina", focacce, testaioli, fried artchokes.
                    Don't forget that we are famous for ham sausage etc.
                    A terrible place for a diet, Mike, a terrible place!
                    Hieronymus

                    - Dalmatius -

                    "I'm forbidden to reign, but I'll never yield before the facts: I am the Cat"

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Mike, I, too, really like the pig as an animal, but I really love bacon and ham, usually avoiding other varieties of pork. I am an unabashed omnivore as to vegetables and meats, but not a gourmand of many types of vegetable, nor do I consume every variety of meat. I do eat a lot of rice.

                      I don't eat the meat of predators, which I consider a professional courtesy [except for lobster, and that with such rarity that I haven't REALLY broken the "predator's code"]. I agree that squid are probably too intelligent to eat.

                      I do love just about all beef, even liver, but the rest of the offal I find awful [pardon the pun]. I avoid brain or kidney or tongue, though, and that might be a good thing.

                      I'm a Cajun from Louisiana, but probably one of the more picky eating Cajuns you'd find. I'd love to do a good pot of shrimp gumbo and rice for you some day (but as I live in Colorado now, I can't do a good roux due to the altitude, the sine quo non ingredient of a good gumbo). I also make probably the best vegetable beef soup west of the Mississippi.

                      I lived in Austin for a while many years ago, and man, do I ever miss the food, especially the Mexican Food. There are some wonderful hole-in-the-wall places in East Austin, if I remember correctly. However, if you're ever in Houston, make sure to go to Lupe Tortilla, probably my favorite restaurant on the planet. Find the original location on the west side of town...limited service hours, and no reservations, but a really great, festive atmosphere and excellent margaritas while you wait for a table. And no, I don't own stock in it, just really miss the old place.

                      My stepdad was a Sicilian who was in the restaurant business in Beaumont for many, many years, and I share your opinion of Olive Garden-variety "italian food".
                      "My candle's burning at both ends, it will not last the night;
                      But ah my foes and oh, my friends, it gives a lovely light" - Edna St Vincent Millay

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        My problem with Mexican food is that I'm dramatically allergic to some of the ingredients, even though I have no trouble at all with spices used, for instance, in Indian food. I love Cajun food but was disappointed to discover (or to be told at any rate) that it's nowadays impossible to buy boudin noir because of the blood involved. That's probably my greatest hypocrisy -- I don't eat pork sausages but I can't resist boudin noir (or indeed the British version, black pudding). I do eat bacon, perhaps because it's so far removed from looking like the original animal. And I love ham, especially the kinds I buy in France. One of my favourite 'simple favourites' is a Parisian ham sandwich (with real baguette, which nobody else seems able to reproduce) washed down by a Lef or a nice Alsatian beer. Oh, yum.
                        Better stop before I find myself at the airport buying a ticket.

                        Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in Europe:
                        The Whispering Swarm: Book One of the Sanctuary of the White Friars - The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction
                        Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles - Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - Modem Times 2.0 - The Sunday Books - The Sundered Worlds


                        Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in the USA:
                        The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction - The Sunday Books - Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles
                        Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - The Sundered Worlds - The Winds of Limbo - Modem Times 2.0 - Elric: Swords and Roses

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Oh my, I was never able to get the hang of blood boudain. I stick with the regular white variety, having a great aversion to blood and blood products. Some of the best boudain ever made is cranked out in tiny stores in little towns in south Louisiana like Mamou, Basile, and above all, Eunice. I believe the best is "Micelle's" in Eunice, probably the best boudain and cajun smoked sausage you can lay your hands on.

                          I bet there are farmers in that area who still do blood boudain, sort of the "black lightning" of the Louisiana back woods...if you're in the area north of Lafayette, find a little store with a butcher counter and ask. I'd bet you could find it! I would think it's more of a cold-weather thing, so not a good choice for a summer sausage....

                          The Parisian ham sandwich sounds pretty awesome with the Alsace beer...one day I'll get a chance to visit "ma mere France". [Not awfully popular to be French these days; oh well, the last good Frenchman, as they say, was "Le Corse"!]
                          "My candle's burning at both ends, it will not last the night;
                          But ah my foes and oh, my friends, it gives a lovely light" - Edna St Vincent Millay

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I can tell you that the French, in the experience of most who have visited since GWB started talking about 'Freedom Fries', are incredibly pleasant to us and can't believe that such anti-French feeling really exists. I feel extremely ashamed about this, since we've enjoyed such great hospitality everywhere we've been. As I've said before, the French have had plenty of experience of colonial wars in places like Vietnam and in the Middle East (and North Africa) and know enough not to become embroiled in them. What amazes me is that the British, who really should know better, allowed themselves to be dragged in -- against the will of the majority of the people and his own party -- by Tony Blair. That remains a mystery to me.
                            We actually tried to buy noir N. of Lafayette and that's where we were told (maybe because we obviously weren't from those parts) it was now banned. I'm not especially proud of my lust for blood...
                            What fascinates me is how Cajun French changes almost from parish to parish (I say 'almost' -- sometimes it isn't). I love listening to it, even if I can't always understand it, and have a huge collection of Cajun records, some by bands unheard of outside their own home areas.
                            I remember when I was first in New Orleans I was asking for a certain street (not sure which now) and nobody understood my (innocently made) French pronunciation. After a while I learned to pronounce stuff if not in the local style, at least so I could be understood! Vive la difference!

                            Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in Europe:
                            The Whispering Swarm: Book One of the Sanctuary of the White Friars - The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction
                            Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles - Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - Modem Times 2.0 - The Sunday Books - The Sundered Worlds


                            Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in the USA:
                            The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction - The Sunday Books - Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles
                            Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - The Sundered Worlds - The Winds of Limbo - Modem Times 2.0 - Elric: Swords and Roses

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              All this talk of not eating squid because of their inteligence is 'almost' making me feel guilty for all the evenings I spend down the pier with a gas lantern hanging just off the water catching a feed of pencil squid. I love a nice feed of stuffed squid tubes or fried rings.

                              We used to get a lot of what we call 'locals' around here (called 'locals' because the are always here unlike the seasonal pencils), but alas they are not so prevelant any more, I think due to over fishing by the commercial fleet. Some of these locals are huge, one squid is enough to feed a family.

                              I can understand peoples aversion to eating some farmed animals due to the horrendous conditions that they endure, but any animal I catch and kill myself I have no qualms whatsoever about eating. At least half of my diet is made up of seafood, but I flatly refuse to buy any seafood, because I will not support the mindless rape of one of our most precious resources.

                              Most of the beef and pork I eat comes straight from a friends farm where I lived and worked for many years. I never had any trouble eating animals that I had a hand in raising. As for black pudding, no good breakfast of bacon and eggs is complete without a serving of black pudding and plenty of worcestershire sauce.
                              My signature is

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