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Reinart der Fuchs
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The Cairene Purse

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  • The Cairene Purse

    Hello, everybody. How nice that this forum is here.

    I am reading the short story The Cairene Purse, as it appears in a collection of The Year's Best Science Fiction in 1991.

    In the story, the narrator describes a hotel in Egypt, and he says:

    It had the same romantic attraction, the same impossible promises. I found that, once within its tiny fly-thick lobby -- actually the communal hallway leading directly to the courtyard -- I was as lost to its appeal as any pop to his lid. I had discovered a temporary spiritual home.

    I am puzzling over the phrase "any pop to his lid." I've never heard it before, and haven't been able to locate another use of it or a definition. I have the vague idea that the phrase relates to illicit drug use -- both "pop" and "lid" relating to several aspects of the drug culture -- but nothing I can find really makes sense of this particular phrase.

    I'm too out of the loop, I think. Can somebody 'splain this one to me, please?

    Thanks.

  • #2
    Originally posted by Sparteye
    Hello, everybody. How nice that this forum is here.

    I am reading the short story The Cairene Purse, as it appears in a collection of The Year's Best Science Fiction in 1991.

    In the story, the narrator describes a hotel in Egypt, and he says:

    It had the same romantic attraction, the same impossible promises. I found that, once within its tiny fly-thick lobby -- actually the communal hallway leading directly to the courtyard -- I was as lost to its appeal as any pop to his lid. I had discovered a temporary spiritual home.

    I am puzzling over the phrase "any pop to his lid." I've never heard it before, and haven't been able to locate another use of it or a definition. I have the vague idea that the phrase relates to illicit drug use -- both "pop" and "lid" relating to several aspects of the drug culture -- but nothing I can find really makes sense of this particular phrase.

    I'm too out of the loop, I think. Can somebody 'splain this one to me, please?

    Thanks.
    I hadn't heard this saying until my German wife introduced it to me. Furthermore, you seem to have found a typographical error. The phrase is something like "Every pot has its lid.". This means a non-polar (non-opposite) pair that are complimentary, e.g. male and female.
    Last edited by Reinart der Fuchs; 01-08-2007, 06:55 PM.
    Infinite complexity according to simple rules.

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    • #3
      Ah, yes. "Pot" would make a great deal more sense, wouldn't it?

      Thank you, Reinart der Fuchs.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Sparteye
        Ah, yes. "Pot" would make a great deal more sense, wouldn't it?

        Thank you, Reinart der Fuchs.
        If the King will believe me, and that he will pardon and forgive me all my old trespasses, there was never King so rich as I shall make him.
        Infinite complexity according to simple rules.

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        • #5
          Tِpfchen and Deckelchen, hehe!

          Originally posted by Reinart der Fuchs
          I hadn't heard this saying until my German wife introduced it to me. Furthermore, you seem to have found a typographical error. The phrase is something like "Every pot has its lid.". This means a non-polar (non-opposite) pair that are complimentary, e.g. male and female.
          It is actually said in the diminuitive form like ... every potty has (finds) a liddikins!
          Egad, I'm being silly, excuse.
          Google ergo sum

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          • #6
            Originally posted by L'Etranger
            It is actually said in the diminuitive form like ... every potty has (finds) a liddikins!
            Egad, I'm being silly, excuse.
            Just asked Cordula, and she doesn't say it in that cutsie way. Regional maybe?
            Last edited by Reinart der Fuchs; 01-09-2007, 06:00 AM.
            Infinite complexity according to simple rules.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Reinart der Fuchs
              Just asked Cordula, and she doesn't say it in that cutsie way. Regional maybe?
              Yes, probably. I never use it because of it. <shudder>
              Google ergo sum

              Comment


              • #8
                You see LE, when I speak German I have a Bayern accent, and I think it's beautiful (excuse the egotistical review of my own pronunciation). I'm told again and again that I speak with no accent, though that was more than 10 years ago, and I dare say you would be impressed even after all this time. When I say anything to my wife, she frowns and, well, turns her nose up at my pronounciation. Why? Because she speaks Hoch Deustch. I learned to speak the language in restaurants, bars, speilhalle,banhof, and in the company of a girlfriend or two with peers my age, and as often as not with a belly full of Hefeweitzen. Consequently, we seldom speak German, a great loss for my son.
                Infinite complexity according to simple rules.

                Comment


                • #9
                  The phrase is still present in the printing of the story in Mike's anthology Lunching With The Antichrist. Perhaps he was using a bit of Cockney rhyming slang - (saucepan) lid = kid, pop as in father?

                  Mike, where are you...?
                  'You know, I can't keep up with you. If I hadn't met you in person, I quite honestly would NOT believe you really existed. I just COULDN'T. You do so MUCH... if half of what goes into your zines is to be believed, you've read more at the age of 17 than I have at the age of 32 - LOTS more'

                  Archie Mercer to Mike (Burroughsania letters page, 1957)

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                  • #10
                    As Marca confirms, in both copies of The Cairene Purse that I have to hand (in Zenith 2 (1990) and London Bone (2001)) the phrase is "as any pop to his lid", so that's four occurances in four different books.

                    If it is a typo, then it appears to have been there from the start in the first publication of the story in Zenith 2.

                    Originally posted by Marca
                    Perhaps he was using a bit of Cockney rhyming slang - (saucepan) lid = kid, pop as in father?
                    I confess when I saw the OP this morning I thought that 'lid' for 'kid' was a more likely typo, seeing as how 'L' is right next to 'K' on a US/UK keyboard.
                    Last edited by David Mosley; 01-09-2007, 09:51 AM.
                    _"For an eternity Allard was alone in an icy limbo where all the colours were bright and sharp and comfortless.
                    _For another eternity Allard swam through seas without end, all green and cool and deep, where distorted creatures drifted, sometimes attacking him.
                    _And then, at last, he had reached the real world – the world he had created, where he was God and could create or destroy whatever he wished.
                    _He was supremely powerful. He told planets to destroy themselves, and they did. He created suns. Beautiful women flocked to be his. Of all men, he was the mightiest. Of all gods, he was the greatest."

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Reinart der Fuchs
                      You see LE, ..., we seldom speak German, a great loss for my son.
                      The world's the same all over, obviously. My brother in France did not speak German to his kids, much to his and their regret now. And my Memsahib didn't speak Hungarian to the girls ...
                      Ask your wife at least to read fairy tales to him at beddie time in German. How about it?
                      Google ergo sum

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Oma has sent some books for Christmas and she has read them to him.
                        Infinite complexity according to simple rules.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I agree that it's useful for kids to learn at least one language while they're young. The school from which I was unfortunately expelled (I was the first ever expulsion from a Steiner school) taught German and Spanish (or French). They also taught algebra to young kids because kids understand symbolic logic early on. I was hugely disappointed to lose algebra when I went into the 'normal' system.
                          OK -- pop to his lid. It's sort of made-up slang -- popper and lid -- drug terms. It's not a mistake.

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                          Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles - Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - Modem Times 2.0 - The Sunday Books - The Sundered Worlds


                          Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in the USA:
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                          • #14
                            The school I went to from K-8 taught French from Kindergarten and then Latin from the 5th grade. We we lucky the Madame was French and when you were in her class you only spoke French.When you entered the 7th you could choose which one you wanted to take. I chose Latin because the Madame was just plain mean :) Good thing though I can still read French ( at least get the gist) but haven't uttered a word since I was 15.

                            I find it sad, that the public school systems don't offer another language in elementry grades when children are sponges. My son as a Freshman struggles with Spanish 2. I wish I had not listened to my husband and kept him in the little private school that offered both French and Spanish.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Michael Moorcock
                              OK -- pop to his lid. It's sort of made-up slang -- popper and lid -- drug terms. It's not a mistake.
                              Mystery solved. How good it is to have you online to clear up these questions Mike
                              'You know, I can't keep up with you. If I hadn't met you in person, I quite honestly would NOT believe you really existed. I just COULDN'T. You do so MUCH... if half of what goes into your zines is to be believed, you've read more at the age of 17 than I have at the age of 32 - LOTS more'

                              Archie Mercer to Mike (Burroughsania letters page, 1957)

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