Announcement

Collapse

Welcome to Moorcock's Miscellany

Dear reader,

Many people have given their valuable time to create a website for the pleasure of posing questions to Michael Moorcock, meeting people from around the world, and mining the site for information. Please follow one of the links above to learn more about the site.

Thank you,
Reinart der Fuchs
See more
See less

grodog visiting London for the first time: recommendations?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • grodog visiting London for the first time: recommendations?

    My wife and I will be travelling to visit my sister (who's studying in London this semester) from 4 December to 13 December.

    I've never been to London, and would love recommendations on recommendations of places to visit, others to avoid, etc. Pointers to good bookstores with MM tomes are always appreciated as well! :D We'll be staying in the Bloomsbury area, not too far from where my sister's dorms are.

    I've given a little thought to visiting Ladbroke Grove and other Cornerlius, Von Bek, Mother London locations, but don't know enough about the city to know if they'd also be fun areas for my wife to visit too (she's not familiar with Mike's fiction, save in the most general terms).

    Mike, do you have any favorite places that someone coming to London for the first time would be "esstential" visits---whether touristy or not (we're happy to run off the beaten path or to spend a day touring the Tower of London, as the case may be)?
    grodog
    ---
    Allan Grohe
    [email protected]
    http://www.greyhawkonline.com/grodog/greyhawk.html

    Editor and Project Manager, Black Blade Publishing
    http://www.black-blade-publishing.com/

  • #2
    It depends if you like gardens, classical places, museums and so ......

    Notting hill and Portobello are pleasant to visit ..... Carnaby street for the myth .....

    Comment


    • #3
      Dear Allan,

      I'll e-mail you separately, to see if you wanna meet up and maybe I can show you both around a few of the less esoteric Moorcockian sites...

      Best,


      John.

      Comment


      • #4
        First-time visitors to London may like to participate in the ages-old tradition of 'Knocking the Bearskin Cap Off' the guards outside Buckingham Palace. This past-time which has entertained English school children for generations frequently involves creeping up behind a guard and then tipping the cap over the front of their faces. This tactic is particularly encouraged because it allows the pushee a few seconds of confusion to make their escape.



        Other hilarious tourist activities include the Nude Tour around St. Paul's Cathedral, Scaling the Gates at Downing Street, and feeding the pigeons in Trafalgar Square.

        An additional benefit of participating in these activites is the experience of staying - completely free of charge - in one of the many 'exclusive' holding cells of the London Metropolitan police, with the possibility, if you're really lucky, of being 'upgraded' to a private room at one of Her Majesty's Prisons.
        _"For an eternity Allard was alone in an icy limbo where all the colours were bright and sharp and comfortless.
        _For another eternity Allard swam through seas without end, all green and cool and deep, where distorted creatures drifted, sometimes attacking him.
        _And then, at last, he had reached the real world – the world he had created, where he was God and could create or destroy whatever he wished.
        _He was supremely powerful. He told planets to destroy themselves, and they did. He created suns. Beautiful women flocked to be his. Of all men, he was the mightiest. Of all gods, he was the greatest."

        Comment


        • #5
          I was in London for a climate change demo a few weeks ago, and managed a little bit of sightseeing along the way. I can particularly recommend St. Paul's Cathedral, which is impressive enough on the outside, but the interior is nothing short of breathtaking.

          The Tate Modern Art Gallery, which is just across the Thames from St. Paul's also has a giant slide in one of the main exhibition halls which people can go fown, although;

          a) you have to book, so I don't know if you could go specifically, and;

          b) I think that it's only intended to be at the Tate for a limited time, so it might not there when you get to London.

          St. Paul's of course, has been on the same spot for over 300 years, so I doubt it'll be going anywhere any time soon!

          Comment


          • #6
            Aside from all the obvious stuff, I would recommend a trip to Greenwich. Not the Maritime Museum, Naval College, etc. (although they are worth a look as well), but the new developments around the Millennium Dome. The architecture round there is completely bizarre and the whole area is new but has a desolate feel to it as the Dome failed. It feels as though you are walking around in a J.G. Ballard novel.

            Comment


            • #7
              Thanks folks! We're definitely interested in all sorts of architecture (castles, tombs, libraries, cathedrals, just plain cool sites), museums (paintings, statuary, musical stuff, and other fun/interesting esoterica), standing stones/dolmens/stone circles/etc., fun restaurants, poets and writers (MM, Doyle, William Blake and the other Romantics, Dickens, Forbidden Planet, etc.), rpgs and such. Does that help?

              I'll have to see if Marillion, Fish, or Hawkwind will be performing while we're there, too, I think.

              My sister's birthday is the 7th of December, so we'd like to take her out someplace nice too---whether to eat, the theatre, a trip to a museum she wouldn't otherwise be able to afford (she's a student), etc.

              John: I'll email you back after Heather and I have a chance to sort through some more planning. Thank you for the kind offer, I think we're likely to take you up on it :D
              grodog
              ---
              Allan Grohe
              [email protected]
              http://www.greyhawkonline.com/grodog/greyhawk.html

              Editor and Project Manager, Black Blade Publishing
              http://www.black-blade-publishing.com/

              Comment


              • #8
                David, that reminds me of the time we visited Buckingham Palace and I CONSIDERED taking a few pics of the gold leaf, the decor, and the artwork before putting my camera away. Only to be apprehended, along with my 8 months pregnant, middle eastern appearance, wife, by several MI-5 agents and a couple of Bobbys who frogmarched me off to a room to be interrogated. We live and learn, I just cant take some things in life seriously any more, its insane, and it could easily have been a scene out of the End of Time trilogy involving the lat. Grodog I'd stick to Ladbrook Grove if I was you, or if you want to see some really incredible Treasures and Antiquities, try Topkapi and the Sultan's Harem Palace in Istanbul. Ferkit!
                Last edited by Tales from Tanelorn; 11-23-2006, 10:47 AM.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by grodog
                  I'll have to see if Marillion, Fish, or Hawkwind will be performing while we're there, too, I think.
                  Hawkwind play London the week after you leave. Unhappily, they're not actaully playing anywhere in the UK whilst you are over

                  If you 're prepared to travel to see standing stones, Avebury is the place to go. It is absolutely fantastic and a lot better than Stonehenge.:D

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by johneffay
                    If you 're prepared to travel to see standing stones, Avebury is the place to go. It is absolutely fantastic and a lot better than Stonehenge.:D
                    I'd agree with that. And West Kennet Long Barrow and Silbury Hill are just down the road. In English terms that's not very far at all!

                    I actually climbed up Silbury Hill, hell of a view from the top. (But don't tell anyone, you're not supposed to. )*

                    * It was long time ago, when I was young and feckless.
                    You see, it's... it's no good, Montag. We've all got to be alike. The only way to be happy is for everyone to be made equal.

                    -:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-

                    Image Hive :-: Wikiverse :-: Media Hive

                    :-: Onsite Offerings :-:


                    "I am an observer of life, a non-participant who takes no sides. I am in the regimented society, but not of it." Moondog, 1964

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Gov, we have a smaller mound like that on the top of Mynyddislwyn mountain just up from our valley.
                      Great place to climb to and have a pint in the local Ale house next to the Churchyard.

                      "Adjoining Mynyddislwyn churchyard is a large tumulus, known as Twyn Tudur (Tudor's Mound).
                      There are various stories about its origin, and many traditions and superstitions associated with it."


                      St Michaels mount is an interesting place to visit and has connections to the Books of Corum.

                      http://www.mysteriousbritain.co.uk/m..._michaels.html
                      Last edited by Tales from Tanelorn; 11-23-2006, 02:28 PM.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Dear Allan,

                        I'd agree that the interior of St. Paul's cathedral is absolutely exquisite, although I object to the idea of having to pay to view the inside of any church.

                        It should be made clear that it's only this newfangled slidey thang at Tate Modern that needs booking in advance. The rest is free.

                        I'd disagree, however, with those who think Stonehenge isn't up to scratch. Having visited a stone circle or three in my time, it remains my favourite. First-time visitors need to appreciate before they go that it's much, much smaller than anyone ever supposes. Once you adjust your expectations, it's a wonderful -- um -- auraful... experience. Except, of course, that you can't walk among the stones any more (without an appointment to do so), because of vandalism.

                        It's also the best part of 100 miles west of London; I don't know how far afield you're planning to go. "Moidel's Mount" is even farther -- maybe 300 miles, but at least if you went that far you could also visit another Moorcockian site in Cornwall... Tintagel (see 'The English Assassin').

                        Best,


                        John.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I think you can still climb to the top of the Dome in St Pauls.
                          More so now I am living in BC, I appreciate very old things, Castles, Cathedrals, Pyramids, Colloseums, Rings of Stone.

                          Tintagel is also very nice, here are some pics from around the Tintagel area

                          http://www.tintagelweb.co.uk/Tintagel%20Castle.htm

                          Devon and Cornwall are some my favourite places in the UK.
                          I find myself drawn to the sea and ocean coastlines, first thing I did was touch the Pacific Ocean when I came to BC.
                          I think Mike says in one of the Corum or Elric books that people who are drawn to the sea have some affinity for the stuff of Chaos!
                          Last edited by Tales from Tanelorn; 11-24-2006, 10:10 AM.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Thanks again for the tips, everyone! We'd considered blowing off Stonehenge for other cicles (thanks for the other pointers). What's the story on getting appointments for viewing Stonehenge---are they readily available if you ask??
                            grodog
                            ---
                            Allan Grohe
                            [email protected]
                            http://www.greyhawkonline.com/grodog/greyhawk.html

                            Editor and Project Manager, Black Blade Publishing
                            http://www.black-blade-publishing.com/

                            Comment

                            Working...
                            X