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Pronunciation of names

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  • Pronunciation of names

    Please help, could someone please show phonetically the pronuciation of the names: Erekأ¶se and jhary-a-conel

    Thanks in advance

  • #2
    Isnt it erra-koose, doesnt the umlaut make the 'O' have an "ooo" sound?

    Comment


    • #3
      I think it might be a diaresis rather than an umlaut, indicating that the vowel should be sounded separately. It's also actually on the final 'e' not the 'o': Erekosأ«. By my reckoning that makes it a four syllable pronunciation - 'air-rek-oh-see'. That's how I've always said it to myself, anyhow.

      Jhary I assume is pronounced 'jarry'. -a- is short (like the 'a' in apple), Conel as 'ko-nell' (stress on the second syllable).

      Again, just my personal taste; I've no idea how MM concieved them. I'd be interested to hear others' views.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by PaulW
        I think it might be a diaresis rather than an umlaut, indicating that the vowel should be sounded separately. It's also actually on the final 'e' not the 'o': Erekosأ«. By my reckoning that makes it a four syllable pronunciation - 'air-rek-oh-see'. That's how I've always said it to myself, anyhow.

        Jhary I assume is pronounced 'jarry'. -a- is short (like the 'a' in apple), Conel as 'ko-nell' (stress on the second syllable).

        Again, just my personal taste; I've no idea how MM concieved them. I'd be interested to hear others' views.
        My bad man, dont know why i thought it was above the "O".

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        • #5
          With Erekosأ« I personally thought it was "air reh ko say"

          and as for Jhary a Conel...my angle is Jar ree a (as in apple) Con ell (as in connelly)

          hehe..its strange how we get into saying something and when someone else says it it just sounds wrong

          S

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          • #6
            So true Shaeve. You encounter that little problem so much when reading science-fiction and fantasy.

            From the way I'm reading it I pronounce Erekosأ« the same as you: air-reh-KO-say. With a subtle trill in the "r".

            As for Jhary a Conel...I always took the "h" as a softening effect. So "jh" would be very simliar in sound to a "zh." It's like saying (english) "sh" only adding a vocalization to it. Thus, I pronounce Jhary as "zhah-ree" with out stress on either of the syllables. I keep the vowels short and almost clipped. It has the side effect of also clipping the "r" to the point where it practically produces the thud of a "d" against the roof of my mouth. Conel, I stress the second syllable: "con-NELL."

            In all though, I think the only person who can really say how they are supposed to be pronounced would be Mr. M.
            "In omnibus requiem quaesivi, et nusquam inveni nisi in angulo cum libro"
            --Thomas a Kempis

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            • #7
              I butchered Michael's names for years. I had the text right in front of me but a kind of "pronunciation dyslexia" came over me (not to take away from those who are dyslexic).

              I would see the name and something very different would come out. Erekose = Eh-rok-see; Jhary a Conel = Jharee-a-colo-nel.

              It was wierd and I have had to re-train myself so I don't sound like a goof :lol:

              I heard the real pronunciation of Melnibone listening to MM's readings. Whoa!
              When they had advanced together to meet on common
              ground, then there was the clash of shields, of spears
              and the fury of men cased in bronze; bossed shields met
              each other and the din rose loud. Then there were
              mingled the groaning and the crowing of men killed and
              killing, and the ground ran with blood.

              Homer, The Illiad

              Comment


              • #8
                I say "mel-nib-oh-knee"

                "air-uh-kose-eh"

                "jar-ee" "ah" "con-el"


                As I live in the South, it comes out as:

                Ya'll come on down ta Mel-nib-o-knee sometime and we'll have us a right good bar-bee-que! Bring that Air-ree-kose feller with you. And that Jerry O'Connell too. Isn't he that feller on the tee vee?

                Comment


                • #9
                  lmao

                  well, that's better than what it would sound like comin' from me:

                  "Well, I t'ink yoou shoud come daown to Melnibone and we can have oourseves a nice little baarbeeque, dontchaknow. Why don't yoou bring dat Erekose fella', dere? And dat Jhary a Conel guy, too, y'know? Idyn't he da one on TV, den?"

                  But seriously, I heard Mr. Moorcock read Melnibone and I was actually suprised that he says it almost the same way I do. Jut a subtle difference that is as much from a differnce in accent and tone as anything.
                  "In omnibus requiem quaesivi, et nusquam inveni nisi in angulo cum libro"
                  --Thomas a Kempis

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    i've always said mel-ni-boon. i was forced to reconsider when i listened to that exerpt from the elric saga.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Terry Jones and I once had a lot of fun on a book programme I was on with him. He asked me how to pronounce some of the names and I told him. Then I kept interrupting him to say he had other pronounciations wrong. Naturally funny guy (also with a keen interest in myth and mediaevalism). Most of the basic pronunciations are on thos recordings I did, I think, and Everking has it pretty much right. But I don't say everyone should pronounce the names the same because, after all, we don't all pronounce foreign names or even regional names the same!
                      What's interesting is that my original inspiration for Elric is Zenith the Albino (see the Savoy website for instance). In English that's Zehnith
                      the Albeeno. In American it's Zeenith the Albayno...

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                      • #12
                        I have always said Al-bye-no.

                        I'm from New Jersey originally so maybe I'm somewhere in between English and American. :lol:
                        When they had advanced together to meet on common
                        ground, then there was the clash of shields, of spears
                        and the fury of men cased in bronze; bossed shields met
                        each other and the din rose loud. Then there were
                        mingled the groaning and the crowing of men killed and
                        killing, and the ground ran with blood.

                        Homer, The Illiad

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Ditto on Al-bye-no for me. I'm proud to say I've always had Melnibone correct in my head.

                          How do you pronounce Vadhagh? Voilodion Ghagnasdiak? Kwll?
                          \"No, I think Space is a dimension of Time. My theory is that Time is a field and that Space exists as an aspect of Time.\" Michael Moorcock

                          \"All I know about anything is \"I wasn\'t. I am. I will not be.\" Michael Moorcock

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                          • #14
                            The names in the Corum cycle are the ones I really want to know how to pronounce. I think they are Cornish, is that right? Seems to be a distinct lack of vowels in all of those names.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Thanks Guys, good stuff. Will probably continue to maul other names a bit in the reading of these most excellent books, but thats two I can get right.

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