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Beowulf movies

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  • Beowulf movies

    Mike

    How's France? I suppose you know about the Beowulf movies in the pipeline? The first to be released is a live action Scandinavian affair that attempts to add some realism to the Mercian Poem.

    http://www.beowulf-movie.com/

    The second due for release in 2007 is by Zemeckis and is CGI and has Ray Winstone and Angelina Jolie as 'Grendeles Modor'. Apparently the've been working on a way to make the CG characters more 'lifelike' and have developed a technology that takes away the doll-like Final Fantasy staring off into space. I think that will be the better of the two.

    http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0442933/

    But as an addenda how is the Elric movie progressing?

    8)
    \'You know my destiny?\' said Elric eagerly. \'Tell me what it is, Niun Who Knew All.\'
    Niun opened his mouth as if to speak but then firmly shut it again. \'No,\' he said. \'I have forgotten.\'

  • #2
    As long as its not a sequal to that god awful Beowulf film with Christopher Lambert, I'll be interested.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Azariel
      As long as its not a sequal to that god awful Beowulf film with Christopher Lambert, I'll be interested.
      I couldn't quite figure out how the Danes were able to invent the PA system during the middle ages. It was a truly atrocious movie - even if it wasn't shit, which it was - Lambert was woefully miscast - about as badly as he was in 1985 when someone thought it was a good idea for a Scotsman to play and Spaniard and a Frenchman to play a Scotsman. Go figure
      Batman: It's a low neighborhood, full of rumpots. They're used to curious sights, which they attribute to alcoholic delusions.

      Robin: Gosh, drink is sure a filthy thing, isn't it? I'd rather be dead than unable to trust my own eyes!

      Comment


      • #4
        The idea was interesting, using Beowulf as a monster hunter, but it was poorly executed, with monotone voices and Mortal Kombat-style filming that made me cringe.

        Comment


        • #5
          Beowulf of the Future seemed to be what they were hinting at. And Lo! It was not good!

          They also borrowed a bit from Lancelot - which kind of irked me, because the netherworld under the lake has real story potential (the only similar example I can think of off-hand is The Broken Sword), which of course would have made a miles better film than Beowulf. Though not I suspect with that production crew ;)
          Batman: It's a low neighborhood, full of rumpots. They're used to curious sights, which they attribute to alcoholic delusions.

          Robin: Gosh, drink is sure a filthy thing, isn't it? I'd rather be dead than unable to trust my own eyes!

          Comment


          • #6
            The Thirteenth Warrior, I think it was called, was a strange movie that actually turned into a Beowulf movie half-way through and wasn't all that bad!
            No news re. the movie lately. Chris is working on the Pullman movie at present, I think.

            Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in Europe:
            The Whispering Swarm: Book One of the Sanctuary of the White Friars - The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction
            Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles - Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - Modem Times 2.0 - The Sunday Books - The Sundered Worlds


            Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in the USA:
            The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction - The Sunday Books - Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles
            Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - The Sundered Worlds - The Winds of Limbo - Modem Times 2.0 - Elric: Swords and Roses

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Michael Moorcock
              The Thirteenth Warrior, I think it was called, was a strange movie that actually turned into a Beowulf movie half-way through and wasn't all that bad!
              No news re. the movie lately. Chris is working on the Pullman movie at present, I think.
              I saw that - it wasn't half bad, but apparently there was a bit of a spat between John McTiernan (the director) and Michael Crichton who wrote the book (I think it was called "Eaters of the Dead" or suchlike).

              Apparently Crichton didn't like what the director came up with - and had a lot of scenes dumped and reshot, so I'm wondering whether or not it might have been better. Certainly in the theatrical version there did seem to be a hint of a sub-plot involving a disgruntled nobleman, which inexplicably vanished part way through.

              Incidentally, the original Richard Donner cut of Superman 2 is being released on DVD at the end of the year, which has to be some sort of a first - nearly 25 after it was originally made. Apparently Donner had shot most of the movie (along with some fairly lengthy scenes involving Marlon Brando's character) before he was fired and Richard Lester brought in (who dumped most of Donner's footage and increased the emphasis on romance and comedy).
              Batman: It's a low neighborhood, full of rumpots. They're used to curious sights, which they attribute to alcoholic delusions.

              Robin: Gosh, drink is sure a filthy thing, isn't it? I'd rather be dead than unable to trust my own eyes!

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Michael Moorcock
                The Thirteenth Warrior, I think it was called, was a strange movie that actually turned into a Beowulf movie half-way through and wasn't all that bad!
                No news re. the movie lately. Chris is working on the Pullman movie at present, I think.

                I too, liked that movie.

                I have very fond memories of Beowulf from my literature class back in the ol school days.

                I flipped out when the tv show,"Star Trek:Voyager", actually had a
                Beowulf inspired episode! I only wished that they acted out the entire poem.

                "With a deep, not-unhappy sigh, Elric prepared to do battle with an army." (Red Pearls)
                - Michael Moorcock

                Comment


                • #9
                  Jim Cawthorn and I started doing a Beowulf comic in the late 50s but Fleetway turned it down in the end. I don't remember that we tried it anywhere else after that.

                  Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in Europe:
                  The Whispering Swarm: Book One of the Sanctuary of the White Friars - The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction
                  Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles - Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - Modem Times 2.0 - The Sunday Books - The Sundered Worlds


                  Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in the USA:
                  The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction - The Sunday Books - Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles
                  Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - The Sundered Worlds - The Winds of Limbo - Modem Times 2.0 - Elric: Swords and Roses

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Michael Moorcock
                    The Thirteenth Warrior, I think it was called, was a strange movie that actually turned into a Beowulf movie half-way through and wasn't all that bad!
                    I'm agreed The 13th Warrior was not a bad movie. It's based on a real chronicle of a viking funeral by an arabian traveller.
                    Plot is similar to Beowulf indeed, we have no magic, Wendels are a kind of unknown people from caves, cannibals.
                    I liked where the viking chief fights until he die.
                    There is some little anachronism in weapons and armour but at the end I think it is a good movie
                    Hieronymus

                    - Dalmatius -

                    "I'm forbidden to reign, but I'll never yield before the facts: I am the Cat"

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I thought the Wends were a known Germanic people. We have some who settled in Texas, I believe. Wendals relations to Vandals I wonder ?

                      Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in Europe:
                      The Whispering Swarm: Book One of the Sanctuary of the White Friars - The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction
                      Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles - Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - Modem Times 2.0 - The Sunday Books - The Sundered Worlds


                      Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in the USA:
                      The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction - The Sunday Books - Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles
                      Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - The Sundered Worlds - The Winds of Limbo - Modem Times 2.0 - Elric: Swords and Roses

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        From http://uhlan.chez-alice.fr/french/spreewald.html, the wendes were slavic people living in Prussia and enslaved by the teutonic knights. Berlin would be a name of slavic origin as Ruppin, Plozin and Custrin. Nowadays, they form a minority in Lusace ( subregion ) with a slavic langage.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Ah, that explains it. I'd thought at first they were Slavic but knew they were from an area of Germany so I assumed they were Germanic. All is made clear. The place in Texas is called Serbin and they have a museum and Wendish festivals and such. Apparently, like many German-speaking Slavs and Germans they settled in Texas after the failure of various revolts in 1848. First Wends arrived in Bastrop County (now not Bastrop County any more) in 1849 about fifteen or sixteen years before our house was built. I think they're Lutherans, whereas a lot of the Germans and Czechs were Catholics. While on the subject, Czechs did also settle in the area and that's where the dobro was invented -- a Czech/Texan instrument somewhat similar to the lap-steel guitar (which could have derived from it). I used to have a great dobro... When my German god-daughter stayed with us, she couldn't understand the form of German being spoken in the area. A sort of lost race, maybe, those Wends. There's got to be a story some local writer could tell...
                          Last edited by Michael Moorcock; 09-02-2006, 09:39 AM.

                          Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in Europe:
                          The Whispering Swarm: Book One of the Sanctuary of the White Friars - The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction
                          Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles - Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - Modem Times 2.0 - The Sunday Books - The Sundered Worlds


                          Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in the USA:
                          The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction - The Sunday Books - Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles
                          Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - The Sundered Worlds - The Winds of Limbo - Modem Times 2.0 - Elric: Swords and Roses

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I found this about the Wends of Texas. So there should be a Wendish community in Australia as well.

                            Here's another article about Texan Wends. There's a distinct Wendish language although it's dying:

                            The proximity of German neighbors eventually resulted in cultural assimilation and adaptation. At the time of their migration, most of the Wends spoke Wendish and German, and those who spoke only Wendish learned German after they moved to Texas. Most of the Wends in Serbin and all of the Wends who settled elsewhere had adopted German as their primary language by the time of World War I...Wendish, however, was gradually supplanted, reflecting the general shift to German language. By the 1930s the language had begun to die out in Texas, and few people remained who were still completely fluent. In the 1980s only a few people could still speak the language.
                            Might explain why Oona couldn't understand them clearly. The dialect could have Wendish influence.

                            It's ironic the Wends had to go all the way to Texas to get assimilated with the Germans!
                            Last edited by Oren; 09-02-2006, 04:27 PM.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Wasn't there a Beowulf inspired comic in the height of the comic Sword & Sorcery craze.. by DC I believe. I recall seeing it briefly as a ad with the Warlord (which I thought was a pretty nifty twist to ERB's Hollow Earth novels).

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