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Jack Staff #11 preview

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  • Jack Staff #11 preview

    Jack Staff #11
    Last edited by Krzysiek; 05-16-2008, 01:53 PM.

  • #2
    Thanks for that, Krzysiek. It's been nearly a year since I first posted about this 'upcoming issue' so I was wondering where it had got to.

    I picked up Jack Staff #10 last month, which has the setup for the JS vs Eternal Warrior story and features a thinly disguised parody of Alan Moore as one 'Morlan the Mystic'.
    _"For an eternity Allard was alone in an icy limbo where all the colours were bright and sharp and comfortless.
    _For another eternity Allard swam through seas without end, all green and cool and deep, where distorted creatures drifted, sometimes attacking him.
    _And then, at last, he had reached the real world – the world he had created, where he was God and could create or destroy whatever he wished.
    _He was supremely powerful. He told planets to destroy themselves, and they did. He created suns. Beautiful women flocked to be his. Of all men, he was the mightiest. Of all gods, he was the greatest."

    Comment


    • #3
      As I said in the other thread, Paul Grist does some damn fine comics, and his Sin City parody was spot on, so I suspect it will be worth while picking up a copy... or the entire series, if your wallet allows!

      Sadly mine does not...
      "That which does not kill us, makes us stranger." - Trevor Goodchild

      Comment


      • #4
        I'm sorry for starting new thread. I even remembered David's old post, but I couldn't find it.

        Comment


        • #5
          The Eternal Warrior strikes again

          "Jack Staff" becomes a monthly series. As a jump-in for new readers Paul Grist has prepared "Jack Straff Special #1". Here's an excerpt from the interview:

          "Coming up in the Special is a character called Molachi the Immortal, who basically has a bit too much time on his hands. There are also regular characters The Claw and Becky Burdock the Vampire reporter, along with one of my favorites, the Eternal Warrior, who would get his own series if I could work three times faster!"

          http://forum.newsarama.com/showthread.php?t=141600


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          • #6
            Is this flattery ?
            Always feels like the guy who is caught stealing something you just made and congratulates you on your skill and taste.
            Ho hum.

            Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in Europe:
            The Whispering Swarm: Book One of the Sanctuary of the White Friars - The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction
            Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles - Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - Modem Times 2.0 - The Sunday Books - The Sundered Worlds


            Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in the USA:
            The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction - The Sunday Books - Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles
            Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - The Sundered Worlds - The Winds of Limbo - Modem Times 2.0 - Elric: Swords and Roses

            Comment


            • #7
              Don't worry, Mike. He probably can't work "three times faster".

              Comment


              • #8
                Whether Grist has officially claimed this or not, or whether it's just commentators drawing their own conclusions (based on Grist's use of IPC's The Steel Claw and Robot Archie (as The Claw and Tom Tom the Robot Man) in Jack Staff) I don't know, but supposedly "the Eternal Warrior" character is based on the Adam Eterno character from Valiant.



                Hmm... the costume seems similar but the sword and pasty skin seems to remind me of someone else.
                Last edited by David Mosley; 01-03-2008, 09:50 AM.
                _"For an eternity Allard was alone in an icy limbo where all the colours were bright and sharp and comfortless.
                _For another eternity Allard swam through seas without end, all green and cool and deep, where distorted creatures drifted, sometimes attacking him.
                _And then, at last, he had reached the real world – the world he had created, where he was God and could create or destroy whatever he wished.
                _He was supremely powerful. He told planets to destroy themselves, and they did. He created suns. Beautiful women flocked to be his. Of all men, he was the mightiest. Of all gods, he was the greatest."

                Comment


                • #9
                  Speaking of Valiant (the UK comic), there was an US comics publisher in the '90s called Valiant Comics who published a comic called Eternal Warrior which featured another pasty-skinned character on the cover.



                  The comic was written and drawn by Barry Windsor Smith, btw, who previously drew Elric for the Marvel Conan comic in the '70s. It's a small world, ain't it?
                  Last edited by David Mosley; 01-03-2008, 09:40 AM.
                  _"For an eternity Allard was alone in an icy limbo where all the colours were bright and sharp and comfortless.
                  _For another eternity Allard swam through seas without end, all green and cool and deep, where distorted creatures drifted, sometimes attacking him.
                  _And then, at last, he had reached the real world – the world he had created, where he was God and could create or destroy whatever he wished.
                  _He was supremely powerful. He told planets to destroy themselves, and they did. He created suns. Beautiful women flocked to be his. Of all men, he was the mightiest. Of all gods, he was the greatest."

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    It still feels as if someone's been rifling through my toolbox... God knows what ERB thought of all the various Tarzan rip-offs and Kipling died convinced that ERB pinched Mowgli. Happily Anthony Skene isn't alive to get furious about my pinching some of the traits of his Zenith the Albino! I feel more upset by what seems to me a vulgarisation of my ideas, rather than the pinching of superficial traits in characters. But I'm always happy to quote Terry Pratchett's belief that fiction is one big pot to which you add and from which you take. Some of us, of course, take more out of the pot than we put in.

                    Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in Europe:
                    The Whispering Swarm: Book One of the Sanctuary of the White Friars - The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction
                    Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles - Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - Modem Times 2.0 - The Sunday Books - The Sundered Worlds


                    Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in the USA:
                    The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction - The Sunday Books - Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles
                    Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - The Sundered Worlds - The Winds of Limbo - Modem Times 2.0 - Elric: Swords and Roses

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Oops, he did it again...

                      JACK STAFF #19
                      Written, art and cover by Paul Grist.
                      Sommerset Stone is a hunter, and his prey is The Claw - and just when Ben Kulmer thought things couldn't get any worse... Plus! A bonus story featuring The Eternal Warrior!
                      32 pages, $3.50, in stores on July 16, 2008.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I wonder if he knew Ken Bulmer, prolific UK sf writer, who was a good friend of mine...?
                        I find this sort of rip off simply depressing because of the way it simplifies and vulgarises ideas.

                        Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in Europe:
                        The Whispering Swarm: Book One of the Sanctuary of the White Friars - The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction
                        Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles - Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - Modem Times 2.0 - The Sunday Books - The Sundered Worlds


                        Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in the USA:
                        The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction - The Sunday Books - Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles
                        Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - The Sundered Worlds - The Winds of Limbo - Modem Times 2.0 - Elric: Swords and Roses

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Don't be unfair, Mike. Alan Moore used virtually every popculture hero in his League of Extraordinary Gentlemen in quite similar way and you seem to adore him for what he did.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            All of them were well and truely into the public domain by then (like 100+ years since written). AND he gave the origional writers a nod (iirc it refered to them in the credits as "Bram Stokers' Mina Harker" and "So and So's Alain Quartermain")

                            And there is something of a diference between "clever pastiche" and "cynical rip-off"

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Can you tell the difference between "clever pastiche" and "cynical rip-off"? AFAIK, Bryan Talbot and Guy Lawley were good guys ripping Mike off, while Grant Morrison and Paul Grist wre bad guys. The first two asked for the permission, while the other two probably didn't. And how about Philippe Druillet? Was he a bad guy before asking and then he became a good guy? Was Steve Leialoha's strip "The Rabbit Wonder Meets the Barbarian Bunny" cynical or clever? How about Dave Sim's Elrod in "Cerebus the Aardvark"? Finally, how about Mike using Nesbit's Oswald Bastable? Wake up, we're living in a postmodern world!

                              A propos Alan Moore - have you read "The Black Dossier", volume III of "The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen"? Propably none of the characters used in this book is in public domain. Not yet. But Moore didn't hesitate to use them, just changed the names sometimes (like Paul Grist did) to avoid paying royalties.
                              Last edited by Krzysiek; 04-22-2008, 01:43 AM.

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