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What is the relation about Mike's Glorianna and the historical Elizabeth I

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  • What is the relation about Mike's Glorianna and the historical Elizabeth I

    People of Multiverse,

    Unhappily I still did not read "Glorianna, the Unfilled Queen" and I was wondering: is there any relation between this character and the historical Elizabeth I?

    Multiversally thankful,
    Rita Maria Felix da Silva
    Multiverse's section called State of Pernambuco
    Brazil.

  • #2
    Hi RitaMaria. I'm sure MM can give you more information, but here's a start-

    According to the introduction of the relatively new edition of Gloriana from Aspect, the novel was written in response to Spencer's The Faerie Queene, which was the story of an Elizabeth of almost mythical proportions, and Peake's Gormenghast books.

    So there is a connection to the real Elizabeth I, but probably a greater connection to her myth.

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    • #3
      This doesn't answer the question, but...

      I've just read a book about Faeries throughout folk-lore and literature (The Erotic World of Faeries, although the title is misleading... honest!), and the author believed that Titania, from 'Midsummer Night's Dream', was also based on Elizabeth I (with Bottom, and other characters representing other members of her social circle, as it were). No doubt the proper academics out there could fill in more of the details, but it seems that the Queen was quite the muse in her day (and well after it, of course). Oddly, a thread in the 'Sonic Attack' section has sprung up about a punk-era film called 'Jubilee' which also took Elizabeth I as its central character. She gets about more than Una! God save 'er...
      "That which does not kill us, makes us stranger." - Trevor Goodchild

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      • #4
        The relationship is to Spenser's Faerie Queene and its notions of chivalry.
        Elizabeth was his 'muse' (Gloriana). She represented the spiritual and physical aspects of the English realm. I was 'arguing' with Spenser, as I indicate in the note to the reader at the beginning of the book.
        So the theme is about chivalry and representation of romantic ideals.
        I think anything else would be a spoiler.

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        Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles - Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - Modem Times 2.0 - The Sunday Books - The Sundered Worlds


        Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in the USA:
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        • #5
          DDM (a multiversal fusion of DeeCrowSeer, Doc and Mike),

          Thank you!
          Hum... "Glorianna". I really have to read this book!

          Rita Maria Felix da Silva
          -Section of Multiverse called Pernambuco
          Brazil. 11:15 p.m. (local time).

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