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Soupieman

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  • Soupieman

    Has anyone else seen the new Superman movie yet. If I was Siegel and Shuster I'd have our names taken OFF the credits of this one. Oy! The makers said they wanted to do it as a sort of 1930s romance-adventure picture. Superman ? I despair.

    Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in Europe:
    The Whispering Swarm: Book One of the Sanctuary of the White Friars - The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction
    Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles - Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - Modem Times 2.0 - The Sunday Books - The Sundered Worlds


    Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in the USA:
    The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction - The Sunday Books - Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles
    Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - The Sundered Worlds - The Winds of Limbo - Modem Times 2.0 - Elric: Swords and Roses


  • #2
    Mike, there's a discussion on Superman Returns in the Movies forum:

    http://www.multiverse.org/fora/showthread.php?t=3586

    Sample post:
    Originally posted by devilchicken
    This was slightly disappointing I thought - didn't care for the story all that much, and it was rather slow (plodding).

    Problem as I see it (admittedly having only a passing familiarity with Superman) is that the story didn't seem too connect well with the character - which is something Batman Returns did really well IMO.

    Brandon Routh, the guy who plays Superman was really good though!
    _"For an eternity Allard was alone in an icy limbo where all the colours were bright and sharp and comfortless.
    _For another eternity Allard swam through seas without end, all green and cool and deep, where distorted creatures drifted, sometimes attacking him.
    _And then, at last, he had reached the real world – the world he had created, where he was God and could create or destroy whatever he wished.
    _He was supremely powerful. He told planets to destroy themselves, and they did. He created suns. Beautiful women flocked to be his. Of all men, he was the mightiest. Of all gods, he was the greatest."

    Comment


    • #3
      When I was very young indeed, the Max Fleischer, Superman cartoons (1940's), were being shown on Scottish ITV, just before Fireball XL5. They were great.

      So, when i got my hands on some of the Sixties Superman comics, I was quite disappointed. How could that stodgy middle aged stuff compare to the swinging new Marvel comics, like Spiderman and the Fantastic Four?

      But the old cartoons were the 40's film noir influenced business. Right down to Clark's fedora and Lois's power shouldered, business two piece.

      Max Fleischer Superman cartoons at the Internet Archive:
      http://www.archive.org/search.php?qu...atype%3Amovies

      Comment


      • #4
        I have high hopes for X-Men 3, and for one with Uma Thurman coming soon called My Super Ex-Girlfriend (any film where a shark is tossed by a jilted lover through a window simply must be seen). However, despite a wide range of reviews Superman Returns seems a pastische of a homage to the Donner films. I get this horrid feeling I will see nothing new.Did not particularly like Hackman's Luthor, preferring Lyle Talbot (Atom Man vs. Superman). Don't like the fact that the key scenes on Krypton were cut due to the film's length. Hopefully they'll be on the Director's Cut DVD - which is about the time I'll be able to see the film.

        I think the new Pirates of the Carribean will be fun.
        Miqque
        ... just another sailor on the seas of Fate, dogpaddling desperately ...

        Comment


        • #5
          Pietro Mercurios Wrote
          When I was very young indeed, the Max Fleischer, Superman cartoons (1940's), were being shown on Scottish ITV, just before Fireball XL5. They were great.
          Robert The Robot.."On Our Way Ome"Do you remember Venus the aquawoman puppet that accompanied the Fireball XL5 show with her own separate adventures?I still have videos of Max Fleischer cartoons.I love Popeye!Especially on Goon Island! I have an old Superman cartoon video in which he takes over a German U-Boat that is covered with swaztikas.I think that particular episode was right near the end of WW2.Popeye was my childhood hero!AKAKAKAK!
          Last edited by voilodian ghagnasdiak; 07-05-2006, 03:01 PM.

          Comment


          • #6
            I am surprised a superman remake was done so soon after Reeves death, quite tasteless is you ask me. Reeves was the ultimate Superman how could they assume they could do better much like The Omen without Gregory Peck...Movies nowadays are a joke anyway, especially remakes. King Kong was another terrible movie IMO. I was surprised expecting better from Jackson. Superman is and will always be Christopher Reeves for my generation.

            Comment


            • #7
              And George Reeves for mine.

              Faster Than A Locomotive And Able To Leap Tall Buildings In A Single Bound..
              I lost interest after the 50/60's stuff.

              Comment


              • #8
                Yes, the Fleischer Superman shorts are my favourites. Anyone notice how Sky Captain pinched from them. We thought X-Men 3 not very good, but probably better than Superman. Linda only likes 'that blue lady' who plays only a small role at the beginning of X-3. What's happened to Hollywood ? Used to be the one thing you could rely on them for were well-told adventure pictures. Now they choose to turn Superman, of all things, into a '1930s adventure romance'. Can't do that, either.

                Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in Europe:
                The Whispering Swarm: Book One of the Sanctuary of the White Friars - The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction
                Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles - Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - Modem Times 2.0 - The Sunday Books - The Sundered Worlds


                Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in the USA:
                The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction - The Sunday Books - Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles
                Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - The Sundered Worlds - The Winds of Limbo - Modem Times 2.0 - Elric: Swords and Roses

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Vampyro
                  I am surprised a superman remake was done so soon after Reeves death, quite tasteless is you ask me. Reeves was the ultimate Superman...
                  In fairness, the Superman movie had been in Development Hell for years before Reeves' death (possibly even before his accident in the first place) so I don't have a problem with the timing of the release.

                  Also, it's worth mentioning that Reeves' Superman belonged to the pre-Crisis era of Superman comics, where Superman was Kal-El, who assumed the alter-ego of a bumbling, clumsy klutz called Clark Kent in order to protect his identity. That portrayal of CK felt old-fashioned even in 1979 when I first believed a man could fly.

                  Post-Crisis John Bryne revitalised the character by making Clark Kent the man who asssumed the alter-ego of Superman in order to carry out his heroic actions. This version was the basis for the Dean Cain portrayal of Superman in the Lois & Clark tv series, where Cain spent as much time (if not more) on-screen as Clark in his civilian duds as he did with his underpants pulled up over his tights.

                  Personally I prefer the second way of describing the character, but I don't know which version the SR movie has gone with. I have to say in any case that it's not high on my list of 'must-see' movies.

                  ETA: That said, I am enjoying the retro-feel of the All-Star Superman comic (by Morrigan Snort, and Frank Quitely).
                  Last edited by David Mosley; 07-05-2006, 03:55 PM.
                  _"For an eternity Allard was alone in an icy limbo where all the colours were bright and sharp and comfortless.
                  _For another eternity Allard swam through seas without end, all green and cool and deep, where distorted creatures drifted, sometimes attacking him.
                  _And then, at last, he had reached the real world – the world he had created, where he was God and could create or destroy whatever he wished.
                  _He was supremely powerful. He told planets to destroy themselves, and they did. He created suns. Beautiful women flocked to be his. Of all men, he was the mightiest. Of all gods, he was the greatest."

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    oh, Superman does not sound too interesting this time around.

                    "With a deep, not-unhappy sigh, Elric prepared to do battle with an army." (Red Pearls)
                    - Michael Moorcock

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      It's ok - just expect to see all the 'super' stuff at the start of the movie. The rest seemed rather slow to me.


                      Didn't like X3 - too many redundant characters floating around with nothing to do (Angel for instance). Did have some excellent and very CGI work at the start - its not makeup that makes Ian Mckellen and Patrick Stewart look 'youthful' at the start of the film, they can now 'unage' a person using old photographs. I thought the result was almost completely photo-realistic.
                      Batman: It's a low neighborhood, full of rumpots. They're used to curious sights, which they attribute to alcoholic delusions.

                      Robin: Gosh, drink is sure a filthy thing, isn't it? I'd rather be dead than unable to trust my own eyes!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by devilchicken
                        It's ok - just expect to see all the 'super' stuff at the start of the movie. The rest seemed rather slow to me.


                        Didn't like X3 - too many redundant characters floating around with nothing to do (Angel for instance). Did have some excellent and very CGI work at the start - its not makeup that makes Ian Mckellen and Patrick Stewart look 'youthful' at the start of the film, they can now 'unage' a person using old photographs. I thought the result was almost completely photo-realistic.

                        ahh yeah, that 'unage' quality was a cool part of the film, when they were a little younger. On a strange, but somewhat same note, I thought that was interesting when in Austin Powers 3, they used old footage of Michael Caine for the flashback,hehe.

                        I noticed on different films, actors used pictures of themselves when they were younger, some people would be out of luck though, the ones who never really take that many photographs over the years, but, that has changed now, so many cameras out there. :)

                        "With a deep, not-unhappy sigh, Elric prepared to do battle with an army." (Red Pearls)
                        - Michael Moorcock

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          As you say much of the drama was focussed on Superman's relationship with his friends and relatives on Earth, which I think was done quite well.

                          I just didn't really get a sense of the character's mythology. It irritated me that aside from that his mysterious departure, his 'return' seemed to serve little purpose whatsoever to justify the premise.

                          Perhaps it was a red herring, but it seemed to me that "Krypton Island" was introduced as a way of forcing the character to face his past in a meaningful way - just came across as rather muddled (as the 'sea monkey crystals' were his father's gift to him).
                          Last edited by devilchicken; 07-05-2006, 06:56 PM.
                          Batman: It's a low neighborhood, full of rumpots. They're used to curious sights, which they attribute to alcoholic delusions.

                          Robin: Gosh, drink is sure a filthy thing, isn't it? I'd rather be dead than unable to trust my own eyes!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I think that can be said for most superhero treatments. Look at Batman for instance, one of the most psychologically complex characters there is, and already into its fifth (and thankfully more respectful movie incarnation)

                            Amazes me how it got turned into a bizarre sci-fi fetishist pantomime. Those last two movies were really quite awful.

                            Look at The Hulk - that was a bit of a wasted opportunity. So much so in fact that Marvel bought back the rights from Universal to remake it.

                            Spiderman has been done pretty well - a superhero movie made by a guy who is first and foremost, a fan of the character.
                            Batman: It's a low neighborhood, full of rumpots. They're used to curious sights, which they attribute to alcoholic delusions.

                            Robin: Gosh, drink is sure a filthy thing, isn't it? I'd rather be dead than unable to trust my own eyes!

                            Comment

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