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David Gemmell cites Mike has a fav author

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  • David Gemmell cites Mike has a fav author

    Gemmell told me that, as a kid, he used to be a big fan of Michael
    Moorcock. He used to wait with baited breath for the next Moorcock
    novel. One day he bought one, took it home and started reading it.
    Instead of fabulous sword and sorcery with characters like Elric and
    Dorian Hawkblood [?] there was a tale of a cross dressing transexual
    named Jerry somebody, and there wasnt a sword or a wizard in sight.
    Gemmell says he never forgot the disappointment, and, when he decided
    to write a thriller based on his experiences in East London, he didnt
    want any of his fantasy fans to suffer the same disappointment.
    http://groups.google.com/group/alt.b...6841d65af3b336
    The cat spread its wings and flew high into the air, hovering to keep pace with them as they moved cautiously toward the city. Then, as they climbed over the rubble of what had once been a gateway and began to make their way through piles of weed-grown masonry, the cat flew to the squat building with the yellow dome upon its roof. It flew twice around the dome and then came back to settle on Jhary's shoulder. - The King of the Swords

  • #2
    Re: David Gemmell cites Mike has a fav author

    Originally posted by Berry Sizemore
    Instead of fabulous sword and sorcery there was a tale of a cross dressing transexual named Jerry somebody, and there wasnt a sword or a wizard in sight.Gemmell says he never forgot the disappointment, and, when he decided to write a thriller based on his experiences in East London, he didnt want any of his fantasy fans to suffer the same disappointment.
    That's made my day! I wonder if he needed therapy? This reminds me why I love Michael Moorcock!
    \"...an ape reft of his tail, and grown rusty at climbing, who yet feels himself to be a symbol and the frail representative of Omnipotence in a place that is not home.\" James Branch Cabell

    Comment


    • #3
      I'm not sure I understand why someone would be disappointed to discover Jerry Cornelius. Seriously.

      Comment


      • #4
        I don't like seeing books passed off as something they're not (e.g. non-sf or fantasy with a misleading cover or copy), but I think an author should be able to write whatever they like. It's one of the reasons I would like to see Mike tackle more non-fantasy stuff in the future.

        I was actually led in to Mike's works by JC. I didn't get them at first (I was 15 or so), but was sufficiently intrigued to seek out his other books and come back to them later.
        'You know, I can't keep up with you. If I hadn't met you in person, I quite honestly would NOT believe you really existed. I just COULDN'T. You do so MUCH... if half of what goes into your zines is to be believed, you've read more at the age of 17 than I have at the age of 32 - LOTS more'

        Archie Mercer to Mike (Burroughsania letters page, 1957)

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        • #5
          "a cross dressing transexual". That's like a double negative, isn't? A transexual who dresses according to the gender they changed from. Funnily enough, I know someone like that!

          Why do some people think all fantasy has to be "swords and wizards"? I mean, why not just read the same book over and over again, then?
          \"...an ape reft of his tail, and grown rusty at climbing, who yet feels himself to be a symbol and the frail representative of Omnipotence in a place that is not home.\" James Branch Cabell

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: David Gemmell cites Mike has a fav author

            Originally posted by Berry Sizemore
            Gemmell told me that, as a kid, he used to be a big fan of Michael
            Moorcock. He used to wait with baited breath for the next Moorcock
            novel. One day he bought one, took it home and started reading it.
            Instead of fabulous sword and sorcery with characters like Elric and
            Dorian Hawkblood [?] there was a tale of a cross dressing transexual
            named Jerry somebody, and there wasnt a sword or a wizard in sight.
            Gemmell says he never forgot the disappointment, and, when he decided
            to write a thriller based on his experiences in East London, he didnt
            want any of his fantasy fans to suffer the same disappointment.
            http://groups.google.com/group/alt.b...6841d65af3b336
            I guess David Gemmell doesn't think that literary experimentation is particularly 'manly'. From the one or two books of his that I've read, I can't say I found them particularly memorable, with the possible exception of Wolf In Shadow (the first Jon Shannow novel - albeit that was little more than a westernised rip-off of Solomon Kane and Stephen Kings Dark Tower novels). When you confine yourself to such a small range of a particular genre, I have to ask how long can a writer maintain their interest in what they are writing?

            Surely experimentation leads to better art...?
            Batman: It's a low neighborhood, full of rumpots. They're used to curious sights, which they attribute to alcoholic delusions.

            Robin: Gosh, drink is sure a filthy thing, isn't it? I'd rather be dead than unable to trust my own eyes!

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: David Gemmell cites Mike has a fav author

              Originally posted by devilchicken
              Surely experimentation leads to better art...?
              Should it? Does it? Every case? Can you quantify successful experimentation? Was JC a successful experiement or was the reader faulty? :-) Such loaded rhetorical questions. :-)
              The cat spread its wings and flew high into the air, hovering to keep pace with them as they moved cautiously toward the city. Then, as they climbed over the rubble of what had once been a gateway and began to make their way through piles of weed-grown masonry, the cat flew to the squat building with the yellow dome upon its roof. It flew twice around the dome and then came back to settle on Jhary's shoulder. - The King of the Swords

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: David Gemmell cites Mike has a fav author

                Originally posted by devilchicken
                When you confine yourself to such a small range of a particular genre, I have to ask how long can a writer maintain their interest in what they are writing?
                Well, Gemmell must have got bored with it, or he wouldn't be writing thrillers. I suppose, for him, that is 'experimentation'. I've never read his stuff, so maybe I shouldn't diss him. But his comments do sound a bit lumpen*, If 'swords and wizards' aren't mentioned on the cover of a book, why would you expect to find them within? It's not as if Mike has ever set out to mislead people.



                *As it's reported in the third person, this could just be someone else's spin on what he had to say.
                \"...an ape reft of his tail, and grown rusty at climbing, who yet feels himself to be a symbol and the frail representative of Omnipotence in a place that is not home.\" James Branch Cabell

                Comment


                • #9
                  Isn't David Gemmell liking your books a bit like Elton John being fond of your records?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    It's no sacrifice...
                    \"...an ape reft of his tail, and grown rusty at climbing, who yet feels himself to be a symbol and the frail representative of Omnipotence in a place that is not home.\" James Branch Cabell

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Yup. That's how I see it, Guy. What's more, I have the weird feeling of being stalked by him. I do a story initially called Ravenbrand, he comes up with something similar. And most recently he seems to have been doing quite a lot of stuff with White Wolf in the title. I hope fans of Elric aren't as disappointed as he was by Jerry C.... :)

                      Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in Europe:
                      The Whispering Swarm: Book One of the Sanctuary of the White Friars - The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction
                      Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles - Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - Modem Times 2.0 - The Sunday Books - The Sundered Worlds


                      Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in the USA:
                      The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction - The Sunday Books - Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles
                      Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - The Sundered Worlds - The Winds of Limbo - Modem Times 2.0 - Elric: Swords and Roses

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                      • #12
                        I meant to add that my own feeling of commitment to readers is to try to come up with as much that's original as possible. That's the sort of demanding reader I am, though I enjoy familiar characters as much as anyone (witness Zenith or, indeed, my current Balzac jag) but I like to see them in as many different aspects as possible. Mind you, if you want to keep making tons of money, the secret is to keep writing more or less the same book over and over again. As Edgar Rice Burroughs, to his own disappointment, found. Not to mention Conan Doyle. Some of us do it because that's all we CAN write; some of us because that's what readers keep demanding. Some of us are just bloody minded and are going to write as originally as possible no matter what. I think I've already mentioned that I felt a strong fellow feeling for Dylan, writing in Chronicle Vol 1, where it's clear he made a decision to remain true to himself and, as he sees it, to his audience by doing new stuff. It's what I love about Dylan, even though his later work gives me an entirely different buzz to his earlier stuff. It's also a commercial decision. You make a lot more dosh by putting yourself on Rpt. A sad irony. But given the kind of dosh you DO make, anyway, it seems more like 'giving back' to try to come up with original ways of doing what you do. I'm writing against a whistling kettle. Time to make the Darjeeling and sort out the crumpets. It's that kind of weather here in N. California at last!!

                        Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in Europe:
                        The Whispering Swarm: Book One of the Sanctuary of the White Friars - The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction
                        Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles - Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - Modem Times 2.0 - The Sunday Books - The Sundered Worlds


                        Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in the USA:
                        The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction - The Sunday Books - Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles
                        Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - The Sundered Worlds - The Winds of Limbo - Modem Times 2.0 - Elric: Swords and Roses

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Michael Moorcock
                          It's what I love about Dylan, even though his later work gives me an entirely different buzz to his earlier stuff. It's also a commercial decision. You make a lot more dosh by putting yourself on Rpt. A sad irony. But given the kind of dosh you DO make, anyway, it seems more like 'giving back' to try to come up with original ways of doing what you do.
                          Coincidentally, Mike, there was a report on today's (or yesterday's as I type) edition of 'Today' on Radio 4 discussing Dylan's recent UK live concerts. Apparently, some Dylan fans have been complaining that his new stuff isn't as good as the old, but he seems disinclined to regurgitate his classic songs. You should be able to hear Mark Ellen, editor of the Word Magazine, and Radio Three's Andy Kershaw's discussion > here < if you haven't already.
                          _"For an eternity Allard was alone in an icy limbo where all the colours were bright and sharp and comfortless.
                          _For another eternity Allard swam through seas without end, all green and cool and deep, where distorted creatures drifted, sometimes attacking him.
                          _And then, at last, he had reached the real world – the world he had created, where he was God and could create or destroy whatever he wished.
                          _He was supremely powerful. He told planets to destroy themselves, and they did. He created suns. Beautiful women flocked to be his. Of all men, he was the mightiest. Of all gods, he was the greatest."

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                          • #15
                            Another afterthought.
                            What would people think if I sat down and wrote the Hawkmoon books all over again ? It seems strange they should want me to do that, given that they can always reread them. The same goes for Dylan listeners. Can't they sit at home, lay back and play the old records (as I do sometimes) while trying to find out what the guy's doing with the new stuff. Don't they have any more respect for him than that. What is he ? A sucked thumb ? I must admit I DO feel a little nostalgic myself. John Lennon and I had 'Stop Knocking Dylan' letters in the same issue of the Melody Maker the first time Dylan went electric... :)

                            Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in Europe:
                            The Whispering Swarm: Book One of the Sanctuary of the White Friars - The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction
                            Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles - Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - Modem Times 2.0 - The Sunday Books - The Sundered Worlds


                            Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in the USA:
                            The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction - The Sunday Books - Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles
                            Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - The Sundered Worlds - The Winds of Limbo - Modem Times 2.0 - Elric: Swords and Roses

                            Comment

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