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Welcome to Moorcock's Miscellany

Dear reader,

Many people have given their valuable time to create a website for the pleasure of posing questions to Michael Moorcock, meeting people from around the world, and mining the site for information. Please follow one of the links above to learn more about the site.

Thank you,
Reinart der Fuchs
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Thanks Mike

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  • lemec
    replied
    Mrs. Slocombe,hehe, from 'Are You Being Served?' that was a funny show.

    :D

    Leave a comment:


  • Marca
    replied
    Mrs. Slocombe lives! 'My pussy got soaking wet!' :lol:

    Leave a comment:


  • Whiskers
    replied
    Originally posted by Perdix
    Yes. I'm helpful like that, doesn't matter who they are: it was the same when I had to make an in-depth examination of Princess Margaret's pussy.
    Was it long-haired or short-haired? Was it in need of a good lapping? Enquiring minds want to know!

    Leave a comment:


  • xidrep
    replied
    Yes. I'm helpful like that, doesn't matter who they are: it was the same when I had to make an in-depth examination of Princess Margaret's pussy.

    Leave a comment:


  • Whiskers
    replied
    Originally posted by Perdix
    I still haven't got over the shock after an American tourist came into Alpine Sports on the Strand (wherein I toiled) and asked me if I could help her with a fanny pack... :| :oops:
    Ooh, matron.
    Oh my!
    :lol:
    Were you able to help her find a good one?

    Leave a comment:


  • xidrep
    replied
    I still haven't got over the shock after an American tourist came into Alpine Sports on the Strand (wherein I toiled) and asked me if I could help her with a fanny pack... :| :oops:
    Ooh, matron.

    Leave a comment:


  • David Mosley
    replied
    I believe when Alan Moore created John Constantine he was able to slip more than a few 'wankers' into the pages of Swamp Thing in the early 80s because no-one on the DC Comics editorial board knew what the word meant.*

    *Chances of the above story being true: 86%

    Leave a comment:


  • Doc
    replied
    I'm guessing you used to be able to call someone in the US a wanker, and most wouldn't think you were insulting them. :lol:

    Leave a comment:


  • Michael Moorcock
    replied
    American English and English English is a two-way process, of course. I sometimes get completely confused about spelling and usage, these days. And I notice Americans are increasingly using 'theatre' and so on, as they revert to the original French, while Brits are not so much taking up American-style spelling as usages -- 'on' a street is now quite common in England when it always used to be 'in' a street. And to my secret disappointment, many more Americans know the word 'wank'. To the extent where Vance's Servants of the Wankh is not likely to appear under that title again. :)

    Leave a comment:


  • EverKing
    replied
    Perhaps being an American put a slightly different slant on my english marks in school. After I started to read Mike's work the over all quality and vitality of my writting improved; to the point, in fact, where one english teacher told me I was the most talented writter she had the pleasure to have a student. The problem came with spelling. Reading so much work by a British author naturally led me to slowly adapt the international/British spelling for many words (a habit I have only started to break in the last year or so)...colour, favour, honour, and dozens of other "-ours" not to mention the affectation of "-re" instead of "-er" in words like "theatre" (I think that was as much from learning French as reading Mike though). It would drive my teachers nutty to correct my papers and on several occasions my grades suffered as a result of my "incorrect" spelling.

    Still, though, I agree with the concensus that Mike's writting has been a great thing in my life. In fact, Mike has been great by way of this site and his literary recomendations and suggestions. So, yes, Thank you!

    Leave a comment:


  • Michael Moorcock
    replied
    Indeed. I remember the rictus of disapproval from my teacher when I read out an essay in class about Edgar Rice Burroughs. Didn't stop me getting top marks for English, though! About all I ever did get good marks for, admittedly.... These days, of course, Edgar Rice Burroughs appears in series of 'Classics'. Though often the worst of his racism is excised. Very different values, altogether. I can imagine what an English schoolboy would have got if, for instance, he'd decided to read either of the Shelleys for his school presentation in 1825. Or Swinburne, some years later.

    Leave a comment:


  • Wolfrik
    replied
    Of course some of my teachers were a little disturbed by my short story assignments. Most of the class would submit variations on C.S Lewis or Roald Dahl but all they could get from me was howling runeblades and blood-soaked antiheroes rushing to their damnation. These days they'd probably ask me if 'everything was alright at home'...

    But that shouldn't stop us launching 'Get Better Marks With Moorcock'. :)

    Leave a comment:


  • Michael Moorcock
    replied
    Hmm. Now that would make a great slogan -- Get Better Marks with Moorcock... :) I didn't get very far with Lady C and was totally confounded by Tobacco Road, at the time thought to be pretty hot stuff. All I remember is a faint feeling of depression. Hardly worth the trouble of learning to pick locks, as it turned out. Though the skill came in useful later, for other purposes... :)

    Leave a comment:


  • L'Etranger
    replied
    Originally posted by Michael Moorcock
    Thanks a lot, Wolfrik! I'm just glad you didn't try to get through The Brothel in Rosenstrasse at 7, as one kid did. Bit like me trying to read
    Lady Chatterley at 10...
    Thanks for that thought, too, Aral.
    Well, maybe that's what finally led to your writing "Gloriana", eh?

    Same here, b-t-w, that your books had a tremedous influence on my English marks. Great fun, unforgotten.

    Leave a comment:


  • Michael Moorcock
    replied
    Thanks a lot, Wolfrik! I'm just glad you didn't try to get through The Brothel in Rosenstrasse at 7, as one kid did. Bit like me trying to read
    Lady Chatterley at 10...
    Thanks for that thought, too, Aral.

    Leave a comment:

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