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Welcome to Moorcock's Miscellany

Dear reader,

Many people have given their valuable time to create a website for the pleasure of posing questions to Michael Moorcock, meeting people from around the world, and mining the site for information. Please follow one of the links above to learn more about the site.

Thank you,
Reinart der Fuchs
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Thanks Mike

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  • Thanks Mike

    Hi Mike

    I'd like to thank you for giving me a priceless gift 28 years ago.

    When I was learning to read at school my teachers had a hard time keeping my attention focused on insipid copy concerning witless children and their pet dog. My parents were dismayed but resigned themselves to the fact that their son would never pursue a literary career.

    However, this all changed after a summer holiday spent at my best friend's house. My friend's older brother, for reasons that still puzzle me, would keep us spellbound for hours by reading from The Jewel in the Skull.

    The following year my mother was astounded when I asked for the very same book for my birthday, and, in a dramatic turnaround worthy of a Hollywood movie montage, I suddenly could not get enough reading material. My English grades soared over the next 15 years - although reading Dancers at the End of Time at the age of 7 almost destroyed my sanity - and I completed my academic journey by gaining a degree in linguistics.

    Fantasy fiction led me into roleplaying games and ultimately to my present job as a games writer/designer. I'm very happy with my life and have never forgotten that it was the gift of literacy that got me where I am. :)

    Well, I shouldn't really gush so much on a public forum, so...

    Thank you very much indeed


    Richard Wolfrik Galland

  • #2
    This is a nice post, so I hope no-one minds me adding to it to bump it back up towards the top, as I've a feeling Mike may have missed it while he's been offline...
    'You know, I can't keep up with you. If I hadn't met you in person, I quite honestly would NOT believe you really existed. I just COULDN'T. You do so MUCH... if half of what goes into your zines is to be believed, you've read more at the age of 17 than I have at the age of 32 - LOTS more'

    Archie Mercer to Mike (Burroughsania letters page, 1957)

    Comment


    • #3
      Thanks a lot, Wolfrik! I'm just glad you didn't try to get through The Brothel in Rosenstrasse at 7, as one kid did. Bit like me trying to read
      Lady Chatterley at 10...
      Thanks for that thought, too, Aral.

      Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in Europe:
      The Whispering Swarm: Book One of the Sanctuary of the White Friars - The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction
      Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles - Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - Modem Times 2.0 - The Sunday Books - The Sundered Worlds


      Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in the USA:
      The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction - The Sunday Books - Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles
      Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - The Sundered Worlds - The Winds of Limbo - Modem Times 2.0 - Elric: Swords and Roses

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Michael Moorcock
        Thanks a lot, Wolfrik! I'm just glad you didn't try to get through The Brothel in Rosenstrasse at 7, as one kid did. Bit like me trying to read
        Lady Chatterley at 10...
        Thanks for that thought, too, Aral.
        Well, maybe that's what finally led to your writing "Gloriana", eh?

        Same here, b-t-w, that your books had a tremedous influence on my English marks. Great fun, unforgotten.
        Google ergo sum

        Comment


        • #5
          Hmm. Now that would make a great slogan -- Get Better Marks with Moorcock... :) I didn't get very far with Lady C and was totally confounded by Tobacco Road, at the time thought to be pretty hot stuff. All I remember is a faint feeling of depression. Hardly worth the trouble of learning to pick locks, as it turned out. Though the skill came in useful later, for other purposes... :)

          Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in Europe:
          The Whispering Swarm: Book One of the Sanctuary of the White Friars - The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction
          Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles - Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - Modem Times 2.0 - The Sunday Books - The Sundered Worlds


          Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in the USA:
          The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction - The Sunday Books - Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles
          Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - The Sundered Worlds - The Winds of Limbo - Modem Times 2.0 - Elric: Swords and Roses

          Comment


          • #6
            Of course some of my teachers were a little disturbed by my short story assignments. Most of the class would submit variations on C.S Lewis or Roald Dahl but all they could get from me was howling runeblades and blood-soaked antiheroes rushing to their damnation. These days they'd probably ask me if 'everything was alright at home'...

            But that shouldn't stop us launching 'Get Better Marks With Moorcock'. :)

            Comment


            • #7
              Indeed. I remember the rictus of disapproval from my teacher when I read out an essay in class about Edgar Rice Burroughs. Didn't stop me getting top marks for English, though! About all I ever did get good marks for, admittedly.... These days, of course, Edgar Rice Burroughs appears in series of 'Classics'. Though often the worst of his racism is excised. Very different values, altogether. I can imagine what an English schoolboy would have got if, for instance, he'd decided to read either of the Shelleys for his school presentation in 1825. Or Swinburne, some years later.

              Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in Europe:
              The Whispering Swarm: Book One of the Sanctuary of the White Friars - The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction
              Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles - Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - Modem Times 2.0 - The Sunday Books - The Sundered Worlds


              Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in the USA:
              The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction - The Sunday Books - Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles
              Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - The Sundered Worlds - The Winds of Limbo - Modem Times 2.0 - Elric: Swords and Roses

              Comment


              • #8
                Perhaps being an American put a slightly different slant on my english marks in school. After I started to read Mike's work the over all quality and vitality of my writting improved; to the point, in fact, where one english teacher told me I was the most talented writter she had the pleasure to have a student. The problem came with spelling. Reading so much work by a British author naturally led me to slowly adapt the international/British spelling for many words (a habit I have only started to break in the last year or so)...colour, favour, honour, and dozens of other "-ours" not to mention the affectation of "-re" instead of "-er" in words like "theatre" (I think that was as much from learning French as reading Mike though). It would drive my teachers nutty to correct my papers and on several occasions my grades suffered as a result of my "incorrect" spelling.

                Still, though, I agree with the concensus that Mike's writting has been a great thing in my life. In fact, Mike has been great by way of this site and his literary recomendations and suggestions. So, yes, Thank you!
                "In omnibus requiem quaesivi, et nusquam inveni nisi in angulo cum libro"
                --Thomas a Kempis

                Comment


                • #9
                  American English and English English is a two-way process, of course. I sometimes get completely confused about spelling and usage, these days. And I notice Americans are increasingly using 'theatre' and so on, as they revert to the original French, while Brits are not so much taking up American-style spelling as usages -- 'on' a street is now quite common in England when it always used to be 'in' a street. And to my secret disappointment, many more Americans know the word 'wank'. To the extent where Vance's Servants of the Wankh is not likely to appear under that title again. :)

                  Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in Europe:
                  The Whispering Swarm: Book One of the Sanctuary of the White Friars - The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction
                  Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles - Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - Modem Times 2.0 - The Sunday Books - The Sundered Worlds


                  Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in the USA:
                  The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction - The Sunday Books - Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles
                  Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - The Sundered Worlds - The Winds of Limbo - Modem Times 2.0 - Elric: Swords and Roses

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I'm guessing you used to be able to call someone in the US a wanker, and most wouldn't think you were insulting them. :lol:

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I believe when Alan Moore created John Constantine he was able to slip more than a few 'wankers' into the pages of Swamp Thing in the early 80s because no-one on the DC Comics editorial board knew what the word meant.*

                      *Chances of the above story being true: 86%
                      _"For an eternity Allard was alone in an icy limbo where all the colours were bright and sharp and comfortless.
                      _For another eternity Allard swam through seas without end, all green and cool and deep, where distorted creatures drifted, sometimes attacking him.
                      _And then, at last, he had reached the real world – the world he had created, where he was God and could create or destroy whatever he wished.
                      _He was supremely powerful. He told planets to destroy themselves, and they did. He created suns. Beautiful women flocked to be his. Of all men, he was the mightiest. Of all gods, he was the greatest."

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I still haven't got over the shock after an American tourist came into Alpine Sports on the Strand (wherein I toiled) and asked me if I could help her with a fanny pack... :| :oops:
                        Ooh, matron.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Perdix
                          I still haven't got over the shock after an American tourist came into Alpine Sports on the Strand (wherein I toiled) and asked me if I could help her with a fanny pack... :| :oops:
                          Ooh, matron.
                          Oh my!
                          :lol:
                          Were you able to help her find a good one?
                          The cat spread its wings and flew high into the air, hovering to keep pace with them as they moved cautiously toward the city. Then, as they climbed over the rubble of what had once been a gateway and began to make their way through piles of weed-grown masonry, the cat flew to the squat building with the yellow dome upon its roof. It flew twice around the dome and then came back to settle on Jhary's shoulder. - The King of the Swords

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Yes. I'm helpful like that, doesn't matter who they are: it was the same when I had to make an in-depth examination of Princess Margaret's pussy.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Perdix
                              Yes. I'm helpful like that, doesn't matter who they are: it was the same when I had to make an in-depth examination of Princess Margaret's pussy.
                              Was it long-haired or short-haired? Was it in need of a good lapping? Enquiring minds want to know!
                              The cat spread its wings and flew high into the air, hovering to keep pace with them as they moved cautiously toward the city. Then, as they climbed over the rubble of what had once been a gateway and began to make their way through piles of weed-grown masonry, the cat flew to the squat building with the yellow dome upon its roof. It flew twice around the dome and then came back to settle on Jhary's shoulder. - The King of the Swords

                              Comment

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