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Welcome to Moorcock's Miscellany

Dear reader,

Many people have given their valuable time to create a website for the pleasure of posing questions to Michael Moorcock, meeting people from around the world, and mining the site for information. Please follow one of the links above to learn more about the site.

Thank you,
Reinart der Fuchs
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  • Governor of Rowe Island
    replied
    Thank you, Mr. M. I'm sure you know that there is a multitude who devour any information on any of your projects.

    Leave a comment:


  • Michael Moorcock
    replied
    I'm supposed to turn in some revisions to it by February, for publication next Christmas, as I understand. It's by no means just on Jewish matters, but there is a running thread to show endemic anti-semitism and its aftermath. It's a miscellany -- it has a wide range of material from the 1840s to the present. Just stuff I like or find interesting.

    Leave a comment:


  • Governor of Rowe Island
    replied
    Any more information on 'Moorcock's Mammoth Miscellany', Mr. M? I may just be lazy but I've just done a quick google search on it and the most I could find out was on the Wyman Institute website and that post dated from February (I think).
    It appears to be a compilation of other people's writing on the 'Jewish problem' (according to the above mentioned website.) Is this correct? And could you possibly elaborate?

    (Sorry to be so pushy!)

    Leave a comment:


  • Michael Moorcock
    replied
    Great. I'll check that out. I think they also televised it many, many years ago.
    The Peake book isn't biography -- it's a memoir. I'll be getting thoroughly into it as soon as I've finished revisions for the Elric, Pyat IV
    and Moorcock's Mammoth Miscellany -- probably around February of
    next year. I plan to have it done and delivered by the time I leave for
    Spain.

    Leave a comment:


  • Pietro_Mercurios
    replied
    Alan Garner: The Owl Service Radio Adaptation

    If anyone's interested, there's a radio adaptation of Alan Garner's
    'The Owl Service' available to listen to on the BBC Radio7 digital service.

    It should be on the site until next Friday 17th, or Saturday 18th December:

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/bbc7/listenagain/saturday/




    you'll probably need RealPlayer.

    Leave a comment:


  • cosmicdolphin
    replied
    Mervyn Peake Biography

    Speaking of Mervyn Peake. How is the Biography coming along?

    Leave a comment:


  • EverKing
    replied
    Speaking of children's stories...

    Are you familiar with "East of the Sun, West of the Moon" ? It's an old picture book whose author/artist escape me at the moment but I can tell you that the art in it is phenomonal. If you haven't seen it, and ever have the bug, I recomend it. It's simplistic, of course, as it's intended more to read to children than by children. It's pretty neat though because it reverses the classic fairy tale. A poor peasant girl must go on a journey to rescue a price who has been taken prisoner by trolls.

    Hmm...I just realised that it's most likey one of the reasons I have been a lover of fantasy fiction most of my life. I grew up with that book as a favourite.

    What is your opinion of Tad Williams's work? I know you generally find the more traditional epic-high-fantasy to be somewhat bland, but I have always found that Williams is one of the better cahracter authors in modern science fiction/fantasy. Then again, I may be partiall because his Memory, Sorrow, and Thorn trilogy was the first more mature fantasy I ever read.

    Leave a comment:


  • Michael Moorcock
    replied
    A fantasy writer both Neil and I agree on as one of the very best is Jonathan Carroll, I should have added! Most of my recent reading for pleasure, apart from poetry and criticism, has been from Persephone Press, who put out a tremendously good list of books which, for one reason or another, have 'fallen through the cracks' or have otherwise been out of print. Oddly enough as a kid I didn't read that much fantasy, though E.Nesbit remains one of my all time favourites. The stories I liked best were Richmal Crompton's 'William' books, school stories by Frank Richards (Charles Hamilton), Sexton Blake stories, and so on. I
    never liked the 'classic' children's stories, such as Winnie the Pooh, Narnia and so on, though I always liked Toad in The Wind in the Willows. Padraic Colum's The King of Ireland's Son was probably a big influence and I did read a lot of mythology. T.H.White remains another favourite, though I didn't read him as a boy, as I recall. I didn't know The Hobbit existed and have never read it. Of the original Inklings, I really liked Charles Williams's supernatural tales. I seem to prefer my supernatural stories set in the here-and-now, though, of course, I was a great fan of Edgar Rice Burroughs and Robert E. Howard as a boy. I haven't mentioned any of the canon here -- Woolf, Joyce, Conrad and so on, but while I admire Joyce I am not a great fan of his, though I do like Woolf, Conrad, George Elliot, Jane Austen, George Meredith and, of course, Charles Dickens. I also love 18th century picaresque novels or those deriving from that form -- Smollett, Fielding, and, earlier, Defoe. I love much of Thackeray, too. I suppose the list is pretty much endless. My advice to someone who wants to write social fiction is to start reading
    imaginative fiction and my advice to someone who wants to be a fantasy writer is to stop reading fantasy and start reading social fiction. There's a lot to be gained from the process!

    Leave a comment:


  • Michael Moorcock
    replied
    I've known both Terry and Neil since they were lads and have really enjoyed seeing them grow successful, and with such good work, but I wouldn't say they were my favourite authors, much as I like and admire them both. To be honest, I don't read a lot of fantasy, apart from that which I'm asked to review. Bester, Aldiss and Ballard were the sf authors who turned me on to the genre and they remain my favourites.
    I've probably burned out on generic sf and fantasy, but I still love Mervyn Peake and Thomas M. Disch's work, in all its variety (including his first class poetry).
    Favourite non-genre writers include Jack Trevor Story (he wrote The Trouble With Harry on which Hitchcock based his film and also Live Now, Pay Later, also filmed with Ian Carmichael), Henry Treece (The Great Captains, in particular), Ronald Firbank (Flower Beneath the Foot etc.),
    Henry Green (Living), Elizabeth Bowen (esp. The Death of the Heart),
    Angus Wilson (I've just done a piece on his masterpiece No Laughing Matter). Modern writers I like a great deal include Iain Sinclair, Alan Wall, Peter Ackroyd (esp. his non-fiction). I thoroughly enjoyed Brian Aldiss's latest (forthcoming) novel Affairs and Hamden Ferrers.
    Lots of others, but mainly what people would call 'social' novels.

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    You might also like to give the books of Corum a try, they were probably my favourites. Wish I could read them again for the first time or read some new Corum books.

    Leave a comment:


  • McTalbayne
    replied
    Ive never actually read Gene Wolfe. It wasnt even until recently that i discovered Michael Moorcock. Ive been a long time Fan of Neil Gaiman. I was reading one of his short storys, "One life Furnished in early Moorcock". I thought to myself, this Elric character is pretty cool. At that point i started searching high and low for the Elric books. Unfortunately everywhere i went they had none in stock, and since they are out of print you couldnt order them. I looked on ebay, started a bidding war with another buyer over a 1984 edition of "the Elric Saga: Pt. 1". I won it, read the entire book in a matter of days, and from then on i was hooked.

    Leave a comment:


  • VonWeiner
    replied
    I know

    he likes Gene Wolfe. Maybe not his favorite. Have you read him?

    Leave a comment:


  • McTalbayne
    started a topic Mikes Fave Authors

    Mikes Fave Authors

    Im sure this has been asked before, but Im curious as to who Mr. Moorcock considers his favorite authors. Do you enjoy the works of Neil Gaiman and Terry Pratchett?
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