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Many people have given their valuable time to create a website for the pleasure of posing questions to Michael Moorcock, meeting people from around the world, and mining the site for information. Please follow one of the links above to learn more about the site.

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Reinart der Fuchs
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  • #16
    I have never enjoyed or been scared by HORROR stories, so I stopped reading them.

    I always broke out into a sweat watching Godzilla, Rodan and Ghidorah duking it out. Literally horror stricken, rubbing the bottoms of my sweating feet. My mom would tell my dad to turn the channel on those Saturday afternoons after the Dodgers games. I'd beg him not to turn the channel and he never did.
    The cat spread its wings and flew high into the air, hovering to keep pace with them as they moved cautiously toward the city. Then, as they climbed over the rubble of what had once been a gateway and began to make their way through piles of weed-grown masonry, the cat flew to the squat building with the yellow dome upon its roof. It flew twice around the dome and then came back to settle on Jhary's shoulder. - The King of the Swords

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    • #17
      The best vampire movie in my opinion by far is Dracula (1931)
      with Bela Lugosi, so devilishly atmospheric and creepy
      the indelible grainy images of that movie are like an old nightmare




      "Welcome to my house ! Enter freely and of your own will !" He made no motion to step to meet me, but stood like a statue, as though his gesture of welcome fixed him into stone. The instant, however, that I had stepped over the threshold, he moved impulsively forward, and holding out his hand grasped mine with a strength which made me wince, and effect that was not lessened by the fact that it seemed as cold as ice - more like the hand of a dead than a living man. Again he said:-

      "Welcome to my house, Come freely. Go safely. And leave some of the happiness you bring !"


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      • #18
        I was never one for horror - I recall seeing them with my mother, and she'd look away, and she'd say "Don't you have nightmares?" I say never, I dream more horrible things than cheesy films and end up using them for stories Very Happy

        I do, however, recall being mortified when Sarah Conner was disigntigrated by the nuclear bomb - I've always been a weird child, scared of things like nuclear bombs, aliens abductions, portals from other worlds. . . I had - still do - have a way too vivid an imagination!

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        • #19
          Bizarrely, the only television programme/film that genuinely used to terrify me on occassion when I was younger was Star Trek! Specifically, the episode of the original series with the salt vampire, and the episode of TNG with the murderous shape-changing critter, that initially disguised itself as a pet dog.
          Arma virumque cano.

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          • #20
            I have fond memories of Dr. Who, but not scary ones, just ones that left a permenant memory. . . Pyramids of Mars being one. Doc' getting blasted by Sutekh's green eyes, some reason I've never forgotten that :D

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            • #21
              Walking home alone from the cinema after watching Blair Witch was quite an ordeal, because that film really me up. Monsters and such I can handle, because it's just make-up or CGI or a puppet, but the unseen horror suggested by the distant crying of babies really sets me on edge... just like the ghost babies in Silent Hill. Actually, I find computer games far scarier than films, because I identify with the poor chap who's wandering around the sewers more, and there's no guarantee he'll survive (especially with my poor reactions and aim).
              "That which does not kill us, makes us stranger." - Trevor Goodchild

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              • #22
                Originally posted by Azariel
                I do, however, recall being mortified when Sarah Conner was disigntigrated by the nuclear bomb
                I think that scene is remarkable in SciFi movies. It's especially effective if you recognize the vista or are from LA. That bomb laid the sprawl even flatter than it already is. But it could be a story of telling not showing. I'm comparing the 70's apocaliptic movies like Logan's Run.

                I did feel tension during Alien.

                The idea of a flying three-headed lizard bird that shoots lightening out of its gobs still stands out in my mind as a fairly horrifying image.

                Is Godzilla good or evil?
                Godzilla can't be classified as good or evil. He has become like a natural catastrophe, like a hurricane. People know he's coming and do the best they can to defend themselves. They wait until he passes and repair the damage after he's gone. I don't think anyone would classify him as evil any more than anyone would classify an earthquake as evil. In the late Sixties he took on the role of a superhero and he was definitely good. We even saw children calling out his name when they needed help fighting off monsters like Titanisaurus and Megalon.
                The cat spread its wings and flew high into the air, hovering to keep pace with them as they moved cautiously toward the city. Then, as they climbed over the rubble of what had once been a gateway and began to make their way through piles of weed-grown masonry, the cat flew to the squat building with the yellow dome upon its roof. It flew twice around the dome and then came back to settle on Jhary's shoulder. - The King of the Swords

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by Michael Moorcock
                  What scared me most as a kid was Richard Matheson's I AM LEGEND, which I couldn't stop reading even though I was doing it in the dark.
                  When the flashlight battery ran out, I started burning paper in the fireplace just to give me enough light to go on reading. This atmosphere, created by the flaring and dying fire, made it all the worse for me. All horror movies scare me, which is why I've seen so few, but my favourites are the old Universal movies by James Whale -- Frankenstein and Bride of Frankenstein, for instance. These movies convey a brooding sense of terror and mystery which most later movies lack for me, though ALIEN, while not strictly in that genre, has much the same atmosphere.
                  All best,
                  MM
                  I enjoyed,as everyone knows,when they turned "I Am Legend" into the movie "The Omega Man." :D I mention it again because, I think it would be cool to make a new version that is more like the original. "I am Legend" was more about vampires,right? "The Last Man On Earth"(Vincent Price) was another movie version of the story.

                  The Andromeda Strain is the movie that scared me. I'd hate to be killed by something that I can't see. All those super-germ/virus unleased on the world type movies always freaked me out.

                  I enjoy all the Hammer films and want to see more of the Peter Cushing
                  Frankensteins. Captin Kronos Vampire-Hunter is one of those rare gems that I really loved.

                  Dracula was always scary as well.

                  I fell asleep on the movie "Ben" one time as a child, I woke up and thought there was a rat climbing on my lower back, it turned out to be a little pouch that I had on my belt that I forgot about. :lol:

                  "With a deep, not-unhappy sigh, Elric prepared to do battle with an army." (Red Pearls)
                  - Michael Moorcock

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                  • #24
                    I sat next to a grumbling John Wyndham at the press showing of Day of the Triffids. In spite of being with the much disappointed author, I was terrified, thought I might be going to have a heart attack (very unlikely given my youth at the time). Everyone else was moaning about how cheesy the movie was when the lights went up. I went out into the street and started jumping at every bit of foliage around.
                    That's how easily convinced I am.

                    Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in Europe:
                    The Whispering Swarm: Book One of the Sanctuary of the White Friars - The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction
                    Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles - Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - Modem Times 2.0 - The Sunday Books - The Sundered Worlds


                    Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in the USA:
                    The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction - The Sunday Books - Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles
                    Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - The Sundered Worlds - The Winds of Limbo - Modem Times 2.0 - Elric: Swords and Roses

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                    • #25
                      I'm certainly a "what you don't see scares you most" kind of guy. My imagination scares me far worse than anything I could see on a screen. One of the things that scared me most as a kid was imagining what was lurking just outside my window--especially something that could come down from the roof.

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by Doc
                        I'm certainly a "what you don't see scares you most" kind of guy. My imagination scares me far worse than anything I could see on a screen. One of the things that scared me most as a kid was imagining what was lurking just outside my window--especially something that could come down from the roof.
                        Dude, same here! I recall as a kid being mortified after watching a picture of "grey aliens" more than anything!

                        Originally posted by Berry Sizemore
                        But it could be a story of telling not showing. I'm comparing the 70's apocaliptic movies like Logan's Run.
                        I recall seeing Logan's Run in High School in English Class (same teacher who told me to read Elric)! The funny part was the Principal came into the room seconds before the orgy scene - man what a chuckle we got out of that close call

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                        • #27
                          I just wanted to say thanks to Mike for the answers and I wanted to let everyone know that we have both questions up on Your Mom's Basement with answers from Mike and others such as Neil Gaiman, Tad Williams, Ed Brubaker, Patton Oswalt, Steven Brust, John Ostrander, Tim Truman, and others. Please check it out.

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