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A request from YourMomsBasement.com

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  • A request from YourMomsBasement.com

    Mr. Moorcock,

    Over at YourMomsBasement.com we're putting together something for
    Halloween where we ask creators a few Halloween-related questions
    which we will ultimately compile into an article to be posted next
    week. We'd love for you to participate if you have the time and
    inclination. If so, the questions are listed below and our email address is [email protected]:

    1. What scared you as a kid?

    2. What are/were your favorite horror movies?

    Thanks for your time.

    Rajan Khanna
    www.yourmomsbasement.com

  • #2
    What scared me most as a kid was Richard Matheson's I AM LEGEND, which I couldn't stop reading even though I was doing it in the dark.
    When the flashlight battery ran out, I started burning paper in the fireplace just to give me enough light to go on reading. This atmosphere, created by the flaring and dying fire, made it all the worse for me. All horror movies scare me, which is why I've seen so few, but my favourites are the old Universal movies by James Whale -- Frankenstein and Bride of Frankenstein, for instance. These movies convey a brooding sense of terror and mystery which most later movies lack for me, though ALIEN, while not strictly in that genre, has much the same atmosphere.
    All best,
    MM

    Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in Europe:
    The Whispering Swarm: Book One of the Sanctuary of the White Friars - The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction
    Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles - Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - Modem Times 2.0 - The Sunday Books - The Sundered Worlds


    Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in the USA:
    The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction - The Sunday Books - Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles
    Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - The Sundered Worlds - The Winds of Limbo - Modem Times 2.0 - Elric: Swords and Roses

    Comment


    • #3
      Mike, I remember reading an old interview from the mid 70s in which you said you liked Witchfinder General, but that you thought it had too much sex in it and that horror films were all about suppressed sex (or something to that effect). Given that Witchfinder looks pretty chaste these days, I wondered if you'd revised your opinion of that or any other horror films. Witchfinder, of course, isn't really a horror film but a historical drama. As is Ken Russell's The Devils, which has plenty of sex in it...
      'You know, I can't keep up with you. If I hadn't met you in person, I quite honestly would NOT believe you really existed. I just COULDN'T. You do so MUCH... if half of what goes into your zines is to be believed, you've read more at the age of 17 than I have at the age of 32 - LOTS more'

      Archie Mercer to Mike (Burroughsania letters page, 1957)

      Comment


      • #4
        No, I didn't like Witchfinder General at all. I still think the best horror is about repressed sexuality (cf The House on the Borderland and a lot of Lovecraft). I don't like modern horror films at all. I don't watch many, so maybe there's some good stuff I'm missing. Actually The Haunting of Hill House (original movie) is another movie which scared me silly!

        Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in Europe:
        The Whispering Swarm: Book One of the Sanctuary of the White Friars - The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction
        Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles - Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - Modem Times 2.0 - The Sunday Books - The Sundered Worlds


        Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in the USA:
        The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction - The Sunday Books - Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles
        Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - The Sundered Worlds - The Winds of Limbo - Modem Times 2.0 - Elric: Swords and Roses

        Comment


        • #5
          A lot of the better horror movies (for me anyway) seem to come from Japan. Films like Ring and Dark Water. The Haunting (of Hill House) is a film that still stands up even today as a quality horror film. It's a shame that a lot of horror films today seem to believe that fancy camera editing and brief flashes of gore equals horror. The more frightening horror movies come not from seeing the monster, but hearing it, knowing that it's there. This is why the Blair Witch Project was such a success, it made you feel you were there.

          But that's just me.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Michael Moorcock
            No, I didn't like Witchfinder General at all.
            Faulty memory there then from me

            While we're on the subject, have you ever seen the stylish poster designs Phillipe Druillet did for several of Jean Rollin's 60s erotic vampire movies. I doubt you'd like the films themselves, but the posters are very eye-catching (the images are slightly expandable):

            http://www.druillet.com/galerie/illu...70_frisson.jpg

            http://www.druillet.com/galerie/illu...-1967_viol.jpg

            http://www.druillet.com/galerie/illu...69_vampire.jpg
            'You know, I can't keep up with you. If I hadn't met you in person, I quite honestly would NOT believe you really existed. I just COULDN'T. You do so MUCH... if half of what goes into your zines is to be believed, you've read more at the age of 17 than I have at the age of 32 - LOTS more'

            Archie Mercer to Mike (Burroughsania letters page, 1957)

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Aral Vilsn
              While we're on the subject, have you ever seen the stylish poster designs Phillipe Druillet did for several of Jean Rollin's 60s erotic vampire movies.
              Trivia for Viol du vampire, Le (1967) [from IMDb]

              * This film consists of two parts. The first (coherent) part is the original short film made by Jean Rollin. The second (incoherent) part of the film was later added by Rollin to expand the film so it could be released to theatres as a feature. That is why most of the characters who were killed in the first part are suddenly brought back to life for the second part.

              :)
              _"For an eternity Allard was alone in an icy limbo where all the colours were bright and sharp and comfortless.
              _For another eternity Allard swam through seas without end, all green and cool and deep, where distorted creatures drifted, sometimes attacking him.
              _And then, at last, he had reached the real world – the world he had created, where he was God and could create or destroy whatever he wished.
              _He was supremely powerful. He told planets to destroy themselves, and they did. He created suns. Beautiful women flocked to be his. Of all men, he was the mightiest. Of all gods, he was the greatest."

              Comment


              • #9
                Currently being in my Second Great Lovecraftian Epoch, I resonate with the Cyclopean concepts of miasmatic, ichorous, understated (preferably batrachian, although hippocephalic is OK) horror. The Colour Out of Space was undoubtedly THE horror story that genuinely freaked me out on first reading it c. 12 years old, and At The Mountains of Madness is a genuine masterpiece of understated, visceral and credible cosmic whoopsiness. For someone not renowned for their mountaineering or Antarctic exploration, HPL certainlty hit the note with the latter...contemporary film tends to over-visualise, although Blair Witch was very effective, allowing for the migraine. :|

                Comment


                • #10
                  Did you also find yourself horrified by the depressing newness of many shunned houses in Lovecraft's New England, which are apparently haunted by some strange MODERN evil, since they are, in fact, no more than a mere two or three hundred years old?

                  LSN

                  Comment


                  • #11
                    Originally posted by Michael Moorcock
                    What scared me most as a kid was Richard Matheson's I AM LEGEND, which I couldn't stop reading even though I was doing it in the dark.
                    Awesome book, that - read it this summer. The ending's just sheer genius. I believe that Charlton Heston made a film based on it, titled 'The Omega Man.'
                    Arma virumque cano.

                    Comment


                    • #12
                      A film loosely based on 'I am Legend,' yes.

                      Comment


                      • #13
                        Vincent Price was in an earlier version called (iirc) 'The Last Man on Earth'. Haven't seen it or read Matheson's original, but TOM is a favourite film of mine.

                        The book that scared me most was Stoker's Dracula of all things. I think it was the fact that 'that sort of book' was frowned on by my parents so there was a frisson of the 'taboo' about when I read it as a adolescent.
                        _"For an eternity Allard was alone in an icy limbo where all the colours were bright and sharp and comfortless.
                        _For another eternity Allard swam through seas without end, all green and cool and deep, where distorted creatures drifted, sometimes attacking him.
                        _And then, at last, he had reached the real world – the world he had created, where he was God and could create or destroy whatever he wished.
                        _He was supremely powerful. He told planets to destroy themselves, and they did. He created suns. Beautiful women flocked to be his. Of all men, he was the mightiest. Of all gods, he was the greatest."

                        Comment


                        • #14
                          Originally posted by Kalessin
                          Awesome book, that - read it this summer. The ending's just sheer genius. I believe that Charlton Heston made a film based on it, titled 'The Omega Man.'
                          I like that movie, Omega Man - I loved its ending, deeply religious withour being overly preachy - genius! :D

                          Comment


                          • #15
                            The Colour Out of Space was undoubtedly THE horror story that genuinely freaked me out on first reading it c. 12 years old
                            That sounds like my experience with H.P. Lovecraft's semi-obscure story The Nameless City. I'm pretty sure I lost sleep over that tale. I've read more Lovecraft since then, but The Nameless City is still one of my favorite HPL stories.

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