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The alternative British Empire.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Anonymous

    The alternative British Empire.

    My favourite fiction of yours includes the Jerry Cornelius series and the two 'airship' yarns about Oswald Bastable. Is there any likelihood that you'll ever write another of these?
  • Ant
    Ant
    Eternal Companion
    • Dec 2003
    • 711

    #2
    Re: The alternative British Empire.

    Originally posted by Shanghai
    My favourite fiction of yours includes the Jerry Cornelius series and the two 'airship' yarns about Oswald Bastable. Is there any likelihood that you'll ever write another of these?
    Three, surely?
    • The Warlord of the Air (NEL 1971)
      The Land Leviathan (Quartet 1974)
      The Steel Tsar (Granada 1981)
    Cordialement,
    Ant

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    • David Mosley
      Eternal Administrator
      • Jul 2004
      • 11823

      #3
      Re: The alternative British Empire.

      Originally posted by Ant
      Three, surely?
      • The Warlord of the Air (NEL 1971)
        The Land Leviathan (Quartet 1974)
        The Steel Tsar (Granada 1981)
      Cordialement,
      Ant
      Three and a half more like:
      • The Warlord of the Air (NEL 1971)
        The Land Leviathan (Quartet 1974)
        The Steel Tsar (Granada 1981)
        The Steel Tsar substantially re-written (Orion 1993)

      :)
      _"For an eternity Allard was alone in an icy limbo where all the colours were bright and sharp and comfortless.
      _For another eternity Allard swam through seas without end, all green and cool and deep, where distorted creatures drifted, sometimes attacking him.
      _And then, at last, he had reached the real world – the world he had created, where he was God and could create or destroy whatever he wished.
      _He was supremely powerful. He told planets to destroy themselves, and they did. He created suns. Beautiful women flocked to be his. Of all men, he was the mightiest. Of all gods, he was the greatest."

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      • Guest's Avatar
        Anonymous

        #5
        The alternative British Empire

        Yes, but I preferred books one and three. I didn't know about the Orion revision/rewrite, and will have a look for it.

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        • Guest's Avatar
          Anonymous

          #6
          The alternative British Empire.

          By the way, shoukld I interpret your response as meaning "No"?

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          • Azariel
            Eternal Companion
            • Sep 2005
            • 787

            #8
            Re: The alternative British Empire.

            Originally posted by Shanghai
            By the way, shoukld I interpret your response as meaning "No"?
            Shhh! I wanna see Mike tackle DC Comics now! :D

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            • Marca
              Eternal Champion
              • Aug 2004
              • 2014

              #9
              Thought I'd chip in and mention (for those who missed his original post several months back, or have forgotten) that Shanghai is Harry Douthwaite (or Harry Warren as he is now). Welcome back, Harry. Sorry I've blown your cover

              For what it's worth, I'd like to see another Bastable too. I have fond memories of reading The Warlord Of The Air, while recovering from a hernia operation and watching the outbreak of the first Gulf War unfold on TV. A strange experience all round.
              'You know, I can't keep up with you. If I hadn't met you in person, I quite honestly would NOT believe you really existed. I just COULDN'T. You do so MUCH... if half of what goes into your zines is to be believed, you've read more at the age of 17 than I have at the age of 32 - LOTS more'

              Archie Mercer to Mike (Burroughsania letters page, 1957)

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              • Guest's Avatar
                Anonymous

                #10
                The alternative British Empire.

                Right, next week I'll acqire a copy of 'White Wolf's Son.'

                Talking of comics, I've always thought Bryan Talbot would make a superb job of turning these books into graphic novels. In black & white, like the original Luther Arkwright strips, which I prefer to his later work in colour.

                Incidentally, I preferred the first and third books because I like airships, which didn't feature in the second one.

                I'll have to work out how to post messages on this site properly. So far all I can do is place a new one or rerspond (and make typos), both anonymously. I'll apply what's left of my brain cells to the problem.

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                • Michael Moorcock
                  Site Host
                  • Dec 2003
                  • 14278

                  #11
                  Well, yes, Brian Talbot is a good choice. But Harry would be another!
                  Incidentally, I was never satisfied with the original version of The Steel Tsar. I felt it fell down on structure. When I wrote it I was in the process of splitting up with a lady who was a little uncertain about whether she wanted to split up or not and alternated between trying to kill herself and trying to kill me! I associate writing that book (and the Sex Pistols book which I did at the same time) more with hands holding carving knives than airships... :) When I had the chance to revise it for the omnibus I added a fair amount of new material. I like it better now! Wrote the new material in summer, in a lovely, calm garden... The American editor who bought the book, incidentally, didn't like my take on Stalin. He was probably the last unregenerate Stalinist in NY!

                  Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in Europe:
                  The Whispering Swarm: Book One of the Sanctuary of the White Friars - The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction
                  Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles - Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - Modem Times 2.0 - The Sunday Books - The Sundered Worlds


                  Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in the USA:
                  The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction - The Sunday Books - Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles
                  Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - The Sundered Worlds - The Winds of Limbo - Modem Times 2.0 - Elric: Swords and Roses

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                  • Talisant
                    Champion of the Balance
                    • Dec 2003
                    • 1299

                    #12
                    Originally posted by Michael Moorcock
                    I associate writing that book (and the Sex Pistols book which I did at the same time) more with hands holding carving knives than airships... :)
                    Conjures a great job description: Knife-thrower on a dirigible!!!
                    "A man is no man who cannot have a fried mackerel when he has set his mind on it; and more especially when he has money in his pocket to pay for it." - E.A. Poe's NICHOLAS DUNKS; OR, FRIED MACKEREL FOR DINNER

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                    • Guest's Avatar
                      Anonymous

                      #13
                      The alternative British Empire

                      I'm curious about the research you did for 'Warlord' and 'Tsar' - into the hardware and the real historical events you used as a springboard for your imagination.

                      Did you do much, or did you already have a lot of knowledge in your head from past reading?

                      I've always imagined you having a capacious memory to match your creative energy, in view of the amount of work you've been able to do.

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                      • Michael Moorcock
                        Site Host
                        • Dec 2003
                        • 14278

                        #14
                        I already knew a lot about what I was writing about before I began the books, because of my obsession with airships and with imperialism!
                        However, I did a lot of specific research and felt that by the end of it I could easily fly a dirigible from London to New York, taking wind and pressure problems into account. I can still imagine the orders I migtht give to crew regarding elevation, speed and so on, so I suppose this stuff went in deep at some point. I know that Keith Robertts, a yachtsman, assumed I was a fellow sailor when I was writing The Ice Schooner for him. He came up with a couple of good technical suggestions for sailing an ice-schooner, too. He was surprised when he learned that I was only familiar with steam-driven ships. Similarly I've had people assume I must have Ukrainian origins because of my descriptions of Ukraine in Byzantium Endures. I think I have a powerful visual memory and imagination though I'm absolutely hopeless at proper names, for instance. I often forget the names of my closest friends and am notorious for misspelling names, even though I can remember every detail of apartments and houses I've lived in since I was a very small child and can also recall conversations (though this is more selective).
                        I suspect quite a large part of my success as a writer is that visual memory. Also a capacity to think myself into, as it were, a role.

                        Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in Europe:
                        The Whispering Swarm: Book One of the Sanctuary of the White Friars - The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction
                        Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles - Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - Modem Times 2.0 - The Sunday Books - The Sundered Worlds


                        Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in the USA:
                        The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction - The Sunday Books - Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles
                        Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - The Sundered Worlds - The Winds of Limbo - Modem Times 2.0 - Elric: Swords and Roses

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                        • Whiskers
                          flying cat
                          • Nov 2003
                          • 1950

                          #15
                          Harry,

                          To create an account:

                          1) Go here and follow the instructions: http://www.multiverse.org/modules.ph...nt&op=new_user

                          2) To log in go here:
                          http://www.multiverse.org/modules.php?name=Your_Account

                          3) If you have problems you should read this: [broken link]
                          Last edited by Rothgo; 04-08-2010, 11:06 AM.
                          The cat spread its wings and flew high into the air, hovering to keep pace with them as they moved cautiously toward the city. Then, as they climbed over the rubble of what had once been a gateway and began to make their way through piles of weed-grown masonry, the cat flew to the squat building with the yellow dome upon its roof. It flew twice around the dome and then came back to settle on Jhary's shoulder. - The King of the Swords

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