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Moorcock Bibliography: 1966-1970

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  • Moorcock Bibliography: 1966-1970

    I'm splitting the '60s Bibliography into two parts mainly because its so long. As with the previous list this is really throwing what I've compiled to date open to 'peer review', so if you see something wrong or know something that should be added, feel free to post.

    Key:
    (nv) = Novella
    (cs) = Comic Strip
    (ss) = Short Story
    (lt) = Letter
    (co) = Collection
    (ed) = Editorial
    (ar) = Article
    (vi) = Vignette
    (rv) = Review
    (rv*) = James Colvin Review (Assumes James Colvin is always MM)
    (n.) = Novel
    (an) = Anthology
    (sl) = Serial Segment
    (pr) = Preface
    (pm) = Poem
    (ob) = Obituary
    (op) = Opinion Piece
    (?) = Unknown

    Note:
    Works are listed in chronological order of publication. Novels appear at the end of their year of publication unless the month in which they were published is known. Also, I'm only listing first publications of books in the UK unless the book is retitled, revised or appeared first in the US (in which case I will list '1st UK publication' as a separate entry).

    All NW Editorials are assumed to be by MM. Where known the original headings for the editorials are used. From #179 the editorials (or Leading Articles) become 'Lead-in's, which I have not included for some reason. (Perhaps because I'm unsure whether they can be correctly attributed to Mike. Anyone know?)

    Revisions to original post
    • Editorial, (ed) New Worlds #158, Jan 1966
    • The Wrecks of Time (Part 3), (sl) New Worlds #158, Jan 1966 [35]
    • Book reviewed, (rv*) New Worlds #158, Jan 1966 [36]
    • Editorial, (ed) New Worlds #159, Feb 1966
    • Making It Matter, (ed) New Worlds #160, Mar 1966 [37]
    • Phase Three, (ss) New Worlds #160, Mar 1966
    • Mainly Paperbacks, (rv*) New Worlds #160, Mar 1966
    • Edits 'Golden Nugget' v1 #1, Mar 1966 [38]
    • The Real Ideas Of Philip K Dick, (ar) Vector #39, Apr 1966
    • The Image and the Actuality, (ed) New Worlds #161, Apr 1966
    • The Ruins, (ss) New Worlds #161, Apr 1966 [39]
    • Consuming Passions, (ss) New Worlds #161, Apr 1966
    • The Real Ideas of Philip K. Dick, (ar) Vector #39, Apr 1966
    • Edits 'Golden Nugget' v1 #2, Apr 1966
    • Editorial, (ed) New Worlds #162, May 1966
    • Breaking Out, (rv*) New Worlds #162, May 1966
    • Edits 'Golden Nugget' v1 #3, May 1966
    • Editorial, (ed) New Worlds #163, Jun 1966
    • A Surfeit - A Surfeit!, (rv*) New Worlds #163, Jun 1966
    • Edits 'Golden Nugget' v1 #4, Jun 1966
    • Landscape without Time, (rv*) New Worlds #164, Jul 1966
    • Edits 'Golden Nugget' v1 #5, Jul 1966
    • Editorial, (ed) New Worlds #165, Aug 1966
    • Edits 'Golden Nugget' v1 #6, Aug 1966
    • Editorial, (ed) New Worlds #166, Sep 1966
    • Behold the Man, (nv) New Worlds #166, Sep 1966
    • Edits 'Golden Nugget' v1 #7, Sep 1966
    • Editorial, (ed) New Worlds #167, Oct 1966
    • Edits 'Golden Nugget' v1 #8, Oct 1966
    • Editorial, (ed) New Worlds #168, Nov 1966
    • Edits 'Golden Nugget' v1 #9, Nov 1966
    • The Girl Who Killed Sultry Caine, (ss) Golden Nugget v1 #9, Nov 1966 [40]
    • Editorial, (ed) New Worlds #169, Dec 1966
    • The Lovebeast, (ss) The Deep Fix, Compact 1966 [41]
    • The Real Life Mr Newman, (nv) The Deep Fix, Compact 1966 [42]
    • Wolf, (ss) The Deep Fix, Compact 1966 [43]
    • The Deep Fix, (co) Compact 1966 [44]
    • The Ice Schooner, (n.) Compact 1966 [45]
    • The Twilight Man, (n.) Compact 1966 [46]
    • The LSD Dossier, (n.) Compact 1966 [47]
    • Somewhere in the Night, (n.) Compact 1966 [48]
    • Printer's Devil, (n.) Compact 1966 [49]
    • Editorial, (ed) New Worlds #170, Jan 1967
    • Editorial, (ed) New Worlds #171, Mar 1967
    • Editorial, (ed) New Worlds #172, Apr 1967
    • The Lessons of the Future, (ed) New Worlds #173, Jul 1967
    • Going Down, Being There, and Coming Back, (ed) New Worlds #174, Aug 1967
    • Polonius at Delphi, (ed) New Worlds #175, Sep 1967
    • Peace and Paradox, (ed) New Worlds #177, Nov 1967
    • A Literature of Acceptance, (ar) New Worlds #178, Dec 1967/Jan 1968 [50]
    • The Singing Citadel, (nv) The Fantastic Swordsman, US: Pyramid 1967 [51]
    • Introduction, (in) Best S.F. Stories from New Worlds, Panther 1967
    • The Jewel in the Skull, (n.) US: Lancer 1967
    • The Wrecks of Time, (n.) US: Ace 1967 [52]
    • Barbarella and the Anxious Frenchman, (op) New Worlds #179, Feb 1968 [53]
    • Into the Media Web, (ar) New Worlds #183, Oct 1968
    • The Delhi Division, (ss) New Worlds #185, Dec 1968
    • Introduction, (in) Best Stories from New Worlds II, Panther 1968
    • Introduction, (in) Best SF Stories from New Worlds 3, Panther 1968
    • Introduction, (in) The Traps of Time, Rapp & Worthing 1968 [54]
    • The Final Programme, (n.) US: Avon Mar 1968 [55]
    • Sorcerer's Amulet, (n.) US: Lancer 1968 [56]
    • Sword of the Dawn, (n.) US: Lancer 1968
    • The Tank Trapeze, (ss) New Worlds #186, Jan 1969
    • Mervyn Peake - an obituary, (ar) New Worlds #187 Feb 1969
    • A Cure for Cancer [1], (sr) New Worlds #188, Mar 1969
    • A Cure for Cancer [2], (sr) New Worlds #189, Apr 1969
    • A Cure for Cancer (3), (sr) New Worlds #190, May 1969
    • A Cure for Cancer [4], (sr) New Worlds #191, Jun 1969
    • No New is Good New, (rv) New Worlds #196, Dec 1969
    • Introduction, (in) Best SF Stories from New Worlds 4, Panther 1969
    • Introduction, (in) Best SF Stories from New Worlds 5, Panther 1969
    • The Dodgem Arrangement, (ss) Speculation #23, Jul/Aug 1969 [57]
    • Preface, (pr) The New SF, Hutchinson 1969 [58]
    • The Peking Junction, (ss) The New SF, Hutchinson 1969 [59]
    • To Thomas Tompion, (pm) The New SF, Hutchinson 1969 [60]
    • The Adventures of Jerry Cornelius: The English Assassin, (cs) International Times 1969 [61]
    • Behold the Man, (n.) Allison & Busby 1969 [62]
    • The Black Corridor, (pm) The Black Corridor, Mayflower 1969
    • The Black Corridor, (n.) Mayflower 1969 [63]
    • The Final Programme, (n.) UK: Allison & Busby 1969 [1st UK] [64]
    • The Jewel in the Skull, (n.) UK: Mayflower 1969 [1st UK]
    • The Mad God's Amulet, (n.) UK: Mayflower 1969 [1st UK]
    • The Sword of the Dawn, (n.) UK: Mayflower 1969 [1st UK]
    • Secret of the Runestaff, (n.) US: Lancer 1969 [65]
    • The Runestaff, (n.) UK: Mayflower 1969 [1st UK]
    • The Time Dweller, (co) Hart-Davis 1969 [66]
    • The Inner Landscape, (co) Allison & Busby 1969 [67]
    • The Nature of the Catastrophe, (ss) New Worlds #197, Jan 1970
    • The Man Who Nobody Knew, (ob) New Worlds #197, Jan 1970 [68]
    • The Michael Moorcock Column, (ar) Speculation v 3 # 1, Jan 1970
    • The Dying Castles, (vi) New Worlds #200, Apr 1970 [69]
    • Last Vigil, (ss) Vision Of Tomorrow #11, Aug 1970 [70]
    • The Sunset Perspective, (ss) The Disappearing Future, Panther, 1970 [71]
    • Introduction, (in) Best SF Stories from New Worlds 6, Panther 1970
    • The Chinese Agent, (n.) Hutchinson 1970
    • The Singing Citadel, (co) Mayflower 1970 [72]
    • The Shores of Death, (n.) Sphere 1970
    • The Winds of Limbo, (n.) Sphere 1970
    Footnotes:
    [35] As James Colvin - Collected in 'The Wrecks of Time' (Ace 1967)
    [36] James Colvin reviews 'The Fireclown' by MM
    [37] With Langdon Jones (assistant editor)
    [COLOR=blue][38] 'Golden Nugget' was a soft-porn magazine that MM edited for its brief duration. Apparently it was an experience he was not keen to repeat. See [broken link]
    [39] As James Colvin
    [40] As Hank Janson - Revised in 'Fabulous Harbours' (Orion 1995) as 'The Girl Who Killed Sylvia Blade'
    [41] As James Colvin
    [42] As James Colvin - Reprinted 1979 (chapbook) - Revised for 'Earl Aubec' omnibus (Orion 1993)
    [43] As James Colvin
    [44] As James Colvin. Collects 'The Deep Fix', 'Peace on Earth', 'The Lovebeast', 'The Pleasure Garden of Felipe Sagittarius', 'The Real Life Mr Newman', and 'Wolf'.
    [45] Revised in 1977 & 1985
    [46] Extensively rewrites 'The Shores of Death Parts 1-2' – Retitled 'The Shores of Death' (Sphere 1970)
    [47] As Roger Harris Rewrite by MM of Harris' original story
    [48] As Bill Barclay - Revised and retitled as 'The Chinese Agent' by MM (Hutchinson 1970)
    [49] As Bill Barclay - Revised and retitled as 'The Russian Intelligence' by MM (Savoy 1980)
    [50] As James Colvin
    [51] ed. L. Sprague de Camp
    [52] Collects 'The Wrecks of Time Parts 1-3' - Double novel with 'Tramontane' by Emil Petaja - Retitled as 'The Rituals of Infinity' (Arrow 1971)
    [53] With Charles Platt - Opinion piece on the state of French Arts and the Intellectual's response thereto
    [54] Anthology edited by MM - Reprinted in paperback (Penguin 1970 & 1979)
    [55] Collects 'Preliminary Data', 'Further Information' and 'Phase Three' - See UK printing
    [56] Retitled 'The Mad God's Amulet' (Mayflower 1969)
    [57] Reprinted in Spectrum Stories #23, 1969 - Retitled 'The Dodgem Division' for 'My Experiences in the Third World War' (Savoy 1980) and as 'The Dodgem Decision' for 'The New Nature of the Catastrophe' (Orion 1993)
    [58] ed. Langdon Jones - Reprinted Arrow 1970
    [59] ed. Langdon Jones - Reprinted Arrow 1970
    [60] ed. Langdon Jones - Reprinted Arrow 1970
    [61] With M. John Harrison (script) & Mal Dean + Richard Glyn Jones (art) - Reprinted in 'The Nature of the Catastrophe' (Hutchinson 1971), 'My Experiences in the Third World War' (part only) (Savoy 1980) and 'The New Nature of the Catastrophe' (Orion 1993)
    [62] Expanded novel of 1966 novella
    [63] With Hilary Bailey (uncredited)
    [64] Collects 'Preliminary Data', 'Further Information' and 'Phase Three' in a revised format
    [65] Retitled 'The Runestaff' for UK and later printings
    [66] Collects 'The Time Dweller', 'Escape from Evening', 'The Deep Fix', 'The Golden Barge', 'Wolf', 'Consuming Passion', 'The Ruins', 'The Pleasure Garden of Felipe Sagittarius' and 'The Mountain'
    [67] Collection - edited by 'Anon' [MM] - Contains three stories by Peake, Ballard and Aldiss - No MM content
    [68] As William Barclay - Obituary for James Colvin
    [69] By Samuel L. Delaney, James Sallis & MM (uncredited) - Reprinted in 'Sojan' (Savoy 1977)
    [70] Retitled as 'Waiting For The End Of Time' for later publications
    [71] ed. George Hay
    [72] Collects 'The Singing Citadel', 'Master of Chaos', 'The Greater Conqueror' and 'To Rescue Tanelorn...'


    Observations:
    And it was all going so neatly... There are three areas that throw things into a little confusion:

    1. The US edition of 'The Final Programme' from one source I have suggests that it just reprints the first 3 JC stories from NW, whereas I know that the UK edition includes the three stories but contains extra material as well. Is this the case, or is my info on the US publication unreliable?

    2. The Wrecks of Time is first collected in a single volume by Ace in the US before appearing in the UK and the Hawkmoon novels all appear in the US first rather than the UK, hence the double entries for the Tetralogy.

    3. The Dodgem Arrangement titles are confusing. If I've got this right, it's first published with that title and then appears to be retitled as 'The Dodgem Division' before most recently settling on 'The Dodgem Decision'. (The fact there is another JC story called 'The Dehli Division' only muddies the water further.)

    There are a couple of MM items from New Worlds in this era that I don't know what they were, hence the (?) next to them. Any clarification would be appreciated (I assume they're articles, but you never know).

    Coming up: The 1970s.

    Bibliography 1955-1960
    Bibliography 1961-1965
    Bibliography 1966-1970
    Last edited by Rothgo; 04-08-2010, 11:16 AM.
    _"For an eternity Allard was alone in an icy limbo where all the colours were bright and sharp and comfortless.
    _For another eternity Allard swam through seas without end, all green and cool and deep, where distorted creatures drifted, sometimes attacking him.
    _And then, at last, he had reached the real world – the world he had created, where he was God and could create or destroy whatever he wished.
    _He was supremely powerful. He told planets to destroy themselves, and they did. He created suns. Beautiful women flocked to be his. Of all men, he was the mightiest. Of all gods, he was the greatest."

  • #2
    F*cking awesome, demos!

    You're gonna have John Davey looking for you!
    (Probably to shake your hand. I'd imagine he'd be glad to hand on the baton and have a little rest from cataloging Mike. :) )
    You see, it's... it's no good, Montag. We've all got to be alike. The only way to be happy is for everyone to be made equal.

    -:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-

    Image Hive :-: Wikiverse :-: Media Hive

    :-: Onsite Offerings :-:


    "I am an observer of life, a non-participant who takes no sides. I am in the regimented society, but not of it." Moondog, 1964

    Comment


    • #3
      Astonishing piece of work! "Well done" hardly says it!

      No New is Good New, New Worlds #196, Dec 1969 is a review of a book called The Neophiliacs by Christopher Booker. (Mike is not keen, over all, though he finds some good points in it.)

      Comment


      • #4
        Thanks (once again) Guy.

        Based on Mike's response in the Golden Nugget thread I've added the issues of GN that he edited into the above listing.
        _"For an eternity Allard was alone in an icy limbo where all the colours were bright and sharp and comfortless.
        _For another eternity Allard swam through seas without end, all green and cool and deep, where distorted creatures drifted, sometimes attacking him.
        _And then, at last, he had reached the real world – the world he had created, where he was God and could create or destroy whatever he wished.
        _He was supremely powerful. He told planets to destroy themselves, and they did. He created suns. Beautiful women flocked to be his. Of all men, he was the mightiest. Of all gods, he was the greatest."

        Comment


        • #5
          Dear Demos, et al.,

          I'd love to be able to say that I've been through your extensive & impressive list in detail, but I'm afraid that time -- or a lack thereof -- precludes that right now.

          I do know that there are a few things I could add, delete, and/or correct, within the great deal that's absolutely spot-on accurate already, but again, current busyness doesn't allow.

          Berry S. recently began to set up a group from amongst Multiverse.org's more bibliographically inclined members, to bring forward something approaching a definitive bibliography. Are you already amongst them? I don't recognise "demos99".

          Oops! Sorry. Gottadash --

          Best,


          John.

          Comment


          • #6
            Hi John,

            No I don't think I'm in this group that you mention - I suspect I'm more of a rogue agent at the moment. :) I'm sure Berry will let me know if he thinks it would be beneficial to invite me (as it were).

            The three Bibliographies that I've posted here were primarily started in order to help me understand the chronology of Mike's life for an online Biography that I'm writing for this site, but it goes without saying that no Bibliography can come about without acknowledging the groundwork laid by your own invaluable A Reader's Guide, a copy of which I picked up in the New Worlds/Murder One bookshop in Charing Cross Road some 13 years ago now.

            :notworthy:

            Cheers,
            David
            _"For an eternity Allard was alone in an icy limbo where all the colours were bright and sharp and comfortless.
            _For another eternity Allard swam through seas without end, all green and cool and deep, where distorted creatures drifted, sometimes attacking him.
            _And then, at last, he had reached the real world – the world he had created, where he was God and could create or destroy whatever he wished.
            _He was supremely powerful. He told planets to destroy themselves, and they did. He created suns. Beautiful women flocked to be his. Of all men, he was the mightiest. Of all gods, he was the greatest."

            Comment


            • #7
              Dear David,

              As you say, I'll leave it to Berry to let you know all about the on-line bibliogroup. (Please, Berry?)

              Hmmm... 'Michael Moorcock: A Reader's Guide' is more than a little out of date now, and just a little embarrassing (to me). My writing's improved somewhat since then!

              Also, of course, it dealt with nothing but the books, and didn't tackle the short pieces' first appearances to any real degree. That doesn't mean that I haven't -- together with my co-bibliographer, Ian Covell -- been researching them all in great depth.

              As I said before, I do know that there are a few things I could add, delete and/or correct within your lists. One day, I will. I promise. Just not now. Sorry 'bout that, but we're in the midst of major building & decorating works here at home, and it's sucking up all my time.

              Thanx & best,


              John.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Moorcock Bibliography: 1966-1970

                Hi Demos,

                Originally posted by demos99
                • Barbarella and the Anxious Frenchman, (?) New Worlds #179, Feb 1968 [53]
                This is an opinion piece which uses the release of the film "Barbarella" to look at the fascination of French culture with comic strips, SF, etc: "What's wrong with current French culture ? Has the fad for the bad gone too far? Maybe it's a hard time for the French psyche as the country changes from agricultural to industrial based economy and moves fast into the future. ... The poor French intellectual discovers pop. Can he possibly find understanding in U.S. kitsch -- can he find a key to his future in pinball machines, comic strips, science fiction, yeh, yeh ..? Is he frustrated, unable to find his answers in ephemera? Giving himself up simply to enjoying the diversions, becoming embarrassed, needing to justify the enjoyment, beginning to intellectualise and claim more for bad films and comic strips than they can stand?"
                Mike H.
                www.holli.co.uk

                Comment


                • #9
                  Thanks, Mike. Much appreciated.

                  Small amendment made to relevant entry in listing.
                  _"For an eternity Allard was alone in an icy limbo where all the colours were bright and sharp and comfortless.
                  _For another eternity Allard swam through seas without end, all green and cool and deep, where distorted creatures drifted, sometimes attacking him.
                  _And then, at last, he had reached the real world – the world he had created, where he was God and could create or destroy whatever he wished.
                  _He was supremely powerful. He told planets to destroy themselves, and they did. He created suns. Beautiful women flocked to be his. Of all men, he was the mightiest. Of all gods, he was the greatest."

                  Comment

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