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Moorcock Bibliography: 1961-1965

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  • Moorcock Bibliography: 1961-1965

    I'm splitting the '60s Bibliography into two parts mainly because its so long. As with the previous list this is really throwing what I've compiled to date open to 'peer review', so if you see something wrong or know something that should be added, feel free to post.

    Key:
    (nv) = Novella
    (cs) = Comic Strip
    (ss) = Short Story
    (lt) = Letter
    (co) = Collection
    (ed) = Editorial
    (ar) = Article
    (vi) = Vignette
    (rv) = Review
    (rv*) = James Colvin Review (Assumes James Colvin is always MM)
    (n.) = Novel
    (an) = Anthology
    (sl) = Serial Segment

    Note:
    Works are listed in chronological order of publication. Novels appear at the end of their year of publication unless the month in which they were published is known. Also, I'm only listing first publications of books in the UK unless the book is retitled, revised or appeared first in the US (in which case I will eventually list '1st UK publication' as a separate entry).

    Revisions to original list
    • The Dreaming City, (nv) Science-Fantasy #47, Jun 1961
    • While the Gods Laugh, (nv) Science-Fantasy #49, Oct 1961
    • Kit Carson's Perilous Ride, (cs) Cowboy Picture Library #337, c.1961
    • Duel Among the Wine-Green Suns, c.1961 [Published in The Time Centre Times v3 #4 - v4 #2, 1995-6] [9]
    • The Stealer of Souls, (nv) Science-Fantasy #51, Feb 1962
    • Going Home, (ss) Science Fiction Adventures #25, Mar 1962
    • The Eternal Champion, (nv) Science Fantasy #53, Jun 1962
    • Kings in Darkness, (nv) Science-Fantasy #54, Aug 1962 [10]
    • Fragment, (ss) Ergo Ego, Sep 1962
    • John Greasey's Old Stand, (ss) Ergo Ego, Sep 1962
    • The Ball, (ss) Ergo Ego, Sep 1962
    • The Failure, (ss) Ergo Ego, Sep 1962
    • The Prodigy, (ss) Ergo Ego, Sep 1962
    • Three Men of Affairs, (ss) Ergo Ego, Sep 1962
    • The Flame Bringers, (nv) Science-Fantasy #55, Oct 1962 [11]
    • The Sundered Worlds, (nv) Science Fiction Adventures #29, Nov 1962
    • To Rescue Tanelorn..., (nv) Science-Fantasy #56, Dec 1962
    • Wrath of the Gods, (cs) Boys World v1 #1, 26 Jan 1963 [ongoing][Disputed] [12]
    • The Greater Conqueror, (nv) Science-Fantasy #58, Apr 1963
    • Guest editor, New Worlds #129, Apr 1963
    • The Blood-Red Game, (nv) Science Fiction Adventures #32, May 1963
    • Dead God's Homecoming, (nv) Science-Fantasy #59, Jun 1963
    • Flux, (nv) New Worlds #132, Jul 1963 [13]
    • Not by Mind Alone, (ss) New Worlds #134, Sep 1963 [14]
    • Black Sword's Brothers, (nv) Science-Fantasy #61, Oct 1963
    • Letter to the Editor, (lt) Times Literary Supplement, 21 Nov 1963 [15]
    • The Stealer of Souls, (co) Neville Spearman Ltd, 1963 [16]
    • The Specimens, (ss) Boy's World Annual 1964, 1963 [17]
    • Sad Giant's Shield, (nv) Science-Fantasy #63, Feb 1964
    • The Time Dweller, (ss) New Worlds #139, Feb 1964
    • Doomed Lord's Passing, (nv) Science-Fantasy #64, Apr 1964
    • The Deep Fix, (nv) Science-Fantasy #64, Apr 1964 [18]
    • Master of Chaos, (ss) Fantastic v13 #5, May 1964 [19]
    • The Mountain, (ss) Boys World v2 #21, 23 May 1964 [20]
    • Editorial, (ed) New Worlds #142, May/Jun 1964 [21]
    • The Secret Life of Elric of Melniboné, (ar) Camber #14, Jun 1964
    • Great Cathedrals of the World: Ely, (ar) Bible Story, 18 Jul 1964
    • The Fall of Frenchy Steiner, (nv) New Worlds #143, Jul/Aug 1964 [22]
    • Goodbye, Miranda, (vi) New Worlds #143, Jul/Aug 1964
    • BSFA Convention 1964, (ed) New Worlds #143, Jul/Aug 1964
    • What's the Argument, (ed) New Worlds #144, Sep/Oct 1964
    • The Shores of Death (Part 1), (sl) New Worlds #144, Sep/Oct 1964
    • No Short-Cuts, (rv) New Worlds #144, Sep/Oct 1964
    • Good Start/Short Reviews, (rv*) New Worlds #144, Sep/Oct 1964
    • We Live in Hope, (ed) New Worlds #145, Nov/Dec 1964
    • The Shores of Death (Part 2), (sl) New Worlds #145, Nov/Dec 1964
    • A Dish of Dobsons/Paperbacks Received, (rv*) New Worlds #145, Nov/Dec 1964
    • Editorial, (ed) New Worlds #146, Jan 1965
    • Books: Fancy and Imagination, (rv) (rv*) New Worlds #146, Jan 1965
    • Editorial, (ed) New Worlds #147, Feb 1965
    • The Mountain, (ss) New Worlds #147, Feb 1965 [23]
    • Books: The Comic Satirist, (rv*) New Worlds #147, Feb 1965
    • Editorial, (ed) New Worlds #148, Mar 1965
    • Escape from Evening, (nv) New Worlds #148, Mar 1965
    • Recommended Paperbacks, (rv*) New Worlds #150, May 1965
    • Editorial, (ed) New Worlds #152, Jul 1965
    • Shorter Reviews, (rv*) New Worlds #152, Jul 1965
    • Preliminary Data, (ss) New Worlds #153, Aug 1965
    • The Good Craftsman at Work, (rv*) New Worlds #153, Aug 1965
    • The Pleasure Garden of Felipe Sagittarius, (ss) New Worlds #154, Sep 1965 [24]
    • Book Reviews, (rv*) New Worlds #154, Sep 1965
    • Editorial, (ed) New Worlds #155, Oct 1965
    • The Golden Barge, (nv) New Worlds #155, Oct 1965 [25]
    • The Santa Claus of the Atomic Age, (ed) New Worlds #156, Nov 1965
    • The Wrecks of Time (Part 1), (sl) New Worlds #156, Nov 1965 [26]
    • Paperbacks reviewed, (rv*) New Worlds #156, Nov 1965
    • Editorial, (ed) New Worlds #157, Dec 1965
    • The Wrecks of Time (Part 2), (sl) New Worlds #157, Dec 1965 [27]
    • Further Information, (ss) New Worlds #157, Dec 1965
    • Stormbringer, (n.) Herbert Jenkins 1965 [28]
    • Warriors of Mars, (n.) Compact 1965 [29]
    • Blades of Mars, (n.) Compact 1965 [30]
    • Barbarians of Mars, (n.) Compact 1965 [31]
    • The Sundered Worlds, (n.) Compact 1965 [32]
    • The Fireclown, (n.) Compact 1965 [33]
    • Edits The Best of New Worlds, (an) Compact 1965 [34]
    Footnotes:
    [9] Co-written with Barrington Bayley - The beginning and end sections survive - Bayley wrote a bridging section for its publication in TCT as by 'Simon Barclay'
    [10] Co-written with James Cawthorn
    [11] Different from story of same title in 'Searchlight Annual for Boys 1956'
    [12] With Ron Embleton (art) - Note: MM denies having written this - Q&A Archive Article #1328
    [13] Co-written with Barrington Bayley
    [14] Retitled 'Islands' for later publications
    [15] MM’s response to 'UGH!' review of 'The Naked Lunch' in TLS
    [16] Collects 'The Dreaming City', 'While the Gods Laugh', 'The Stealer of Souls', 'Kings in Darkness' & 'The Flame Bringers'
    [17] Uncredited - Possibly by Barrington Bayley - Note: UK annuals appeared in the year before their cover date
    [18] As James Colvin
    [19] Retitled 'The Dream of Earl Aubec' and 'Earl Aubec' for later publications
    [20] This is a different story to the one which appears in 'New Worlds #147' Feb 1965
    [21] 1st regular MM edited New Worlds
    [22] Started by MM - Completed and credited to Hilary Bailey - See Q&A ([broken link])
    [23] As James Colvin - Different story from that in 'Boys World v2 #21'
    [24] As James Colvin - Revised for 'Von Bek' omnibus (Orion 1992)
    [25] As William Barclay
    [26] As James Colvin - Collected in 'The Wrecks of Time' (Ace 1967)
    [27] As James Colvin - Collected in 'The Wrecks of Time' (Ace 1967)
    [28] Collects in an edited format 'Dead God's Homecoming', 'Black Sword's Brothers', 'Sad Giant's Shield' and 'Doomed Lord's Passing'
    [29] As Edward P. Bradbury - Retitled 'City of the Beast' (NEL 1971)
    [30] As Edward P. Bradbury - Retitled 'Lord of the Spiders' (NEL 1971)
    [31] As Edward P. Bradbury - Retitled 'Master of the Pit' (NEL 1971)
    [32] Collects 'The Sundered Worlds' and 'The Blood-Red Game' - Retitled 'The Blood-Red Game' (Mayflower 1974)
    [33] Retitled 'The Winds of Limbo' (Sphere 1970)
    [34] Anthology - contains 'The Time Dweller', 'The Fall of Frenchy Steiner' and 'The Mountain' - No new material by MM


    Observations:
    I imagine that the main thing missing from the above list is Mike's 'comics' work for Look & Learn, Bible Story, etc. I think Guy's already posted a list of Mike's stuff from BS so I'll go and check that out.

    As mentioned in the note preceeding the list, I'm assuming that all instances of work credited to James Colvin actually is MM and not anyone else using the pseudonym. I noticed at least one entry in an edition of NW credited to 'Bill Barclay' but I'm not sure if that was a 'house' pseudonym or one only ever used by Mike.

    Bibliography 1955-1960
    Bibliography 1961-1965
    Bibliography 1966-1970
    Last edited by Rothgo; 04-09-2010, 12:04 PM.
    _"For an eternity Allard was alone in an icy limbo where all the colours were bright and sharp and comfortless.
    _For another eternity Allard swam through seas without end, all green and cool and deep, where distorted creatures drifted, sometimes attacking him.
    _And then, at last, he had reached the real world – the world he had created, where he was God and could create or destroy whatever he wished.
    _He was supremely powerful. He told planets to destroy themselves, and they did. He created suns. Beautiful women flocked to be his. Of all men, he was the mightiest. Of all gods, he was the greatest."

  • #2
    Is there no stopping this man? :D Excellent stuff.

    A couple of quick observations on the above. John Davey had some interesting comments in an old thread, mentioning that the Boys World story The Mountain is a different one to that which appeared in New Worlds, and that Time Drop is by Barry Bayley, not Mike.

    Summary:

    Okay, 'Boys' World': Mike wrote a bylined story called 'The Mountain' -- NOT the well-known story later published in 'New Worlds' -- in 'Boys' World' #21. (I don't have the date to hand, but it would've been early/mid-sixties.) The 1964 'Boys' World' annual had an M.M.-bylined story called 'The Specimens', and the 1965 annual had an M.M.-bylined story BY Barry Bayley called 'Time Drop'.

    Full thread:

    [link expired]

    Also, being the pedantic sort, John Creasey's Old Stand is actually called John Greasey's Old Stand (my italics) - it's an amusing intro piece to Ergo Ego. I may be able to scan this when I get round to doing Ergo Ego for the Image Gallery. Being similarly pedantic, it's not really correct to refer to 'Ergo Ego #1', as it was always intended as a one-off publication and therefore has no issue number.
    'You know, I can't keep up with you. If I hadn't met you in person, I quite honestly would NOT believe you really existed. I just COULDN'T. You do so MUCH... if half of what goes into your zines is to be believed, you've read more at the age of 17 than I have at the age of 32 - LOTS more'

    Archie Mercer to Mike (Burroughsania letters page, 1957)

    Comment


    • #3
      Aral, thanks for the updates - I've made the relevant changes to my original post.

      With regards to the 'Great Cathedrals of the World' series, it seems (according to this site > http://contento.best.vwh.net/paper/t9.htm < which lists the contents for most issues of Bible Story) that this was originally written by Hugh Ross Williamson, but most entries are uncredited.

      The list of uncredited articles are:

      Great Cathedrals of the World: St. Paul’s, BS#3, March 21, 1964
      Great Cathedrals of the World: Notre Dame, BS#4, March 28, 1964
      Great Cathedrals of the World: Milan, BS#5, April 4, 1964
      Great Cathedrals of the World: York Minster, BS#7, April 18, 1964
      Great Cathedrals of the World: St. Mark’s, Venice, BS#8, April 25, 1964
      Great Cathedrals of the World: Durham, BS#11, May 16, 1964
      Great Cathedrals of the World: Worcester, BS#12, May 23, 1964
      Great Cathedrals of the World: Rheims, BS#13, May 30, 1964
      Great Cathedrals of the World: Mainz, BS#14, June 6, 1964
      Great Cathedrals of the World: Salisbury, BS#21, July 25, 1964
      Great Cathedrals of the World: Llandaff, BS#23, August 8, 1964
      Great Cathedrals of the World: Exeter, BS#25, August 22, 1964*
      Great Cathedrals of the World: Lincoln, BS#26, August 29, 1964
      Great Cathedrals of the World: Bury St. Edmunds, BS#28, September 12, 1964*

      *Credited to MM?

      BS#9 (May 2 1964) doesn't have an article on GCotW, but instead has one titled: 'St. Sophia - Cathedral, Mosque, Museum'. Might this a) have been written initially for the GCotW series? and b) might Mike have had a hand in writing it in that case?
      _"For an eternity Allard was alone in an icy limbo where all the colours were bright and sharp and comfortless.
      _For another eternity Allard swam through seas without end, all green and cool and deep, where distorted creatures drifted, sometimes attacking him.
      _And then, at last, he had reached the real world – the world he had created, where he was God and could create or destroy whatever he wished.
      _He was supremely powerful. He told planets to destroy themselves, and they did. He created suns. Beautiful women flocked to be his. Of all men, he was the mightiest. Of all gods, he was the greatest."

      Comment


      • #4
        Demos, you have prompted me to go check my copies of Bible Story 25 and 28, I think for the first time since I got my full set.

        I can confirm that GCOTW in 25 and 28 are credited to MM, as well as Ely (20). I must have missed 28 and confuse 20 and 25 previously.

        I've been through them all and filled your gaps (below).

        No. 9, St Sophia, was listed as one of the series in the index (of issues 1-26) which they published in no.27.

        Great Cathedrals of the World: Canterbury, BS#1 March 7, 1964 - Hugh Ross Williamson
        Great Cathedrals of the World: St. Patrick's New York, BS#2 March 14, 1964 - Hugh Ross Williamson
        Great Cathedrals of the World: St. Paul's, BS#3, March 21 - no credit
        Great Cathedrals of the World: Notre Dame, BS#4, March 28 - no credit
        Great Cathedrals of the World: Milan, BS#5, April 4, 1964 - no credit

        Great Cathedrals of the World: Winchester, BS#6, April 11th - Hugh Ross Williamson
        Great Cathedrals of the World: York Minster, BS#7, April 18, 1964 - no credit
        Great Cathedrals of the World: St. Mark's, Venice, BS#8, April 25, 1964 - no credit
        Great Cathedrals of the World: St. Sophia, Istanbul, BS#9, May 2, 1964, 1964 - no credit

        BS#10, May 9, 1964, 1964 - no GCotW
        Great Cathedrals of the World: Durham, BS#11, May 16, 1964 - no credit
        Great Cathedrals of the World: Worcester, BS#12, May 23, 1964 - no credit
        Great Cathedrals of the World: Rheims, BS#13, May 30, 1964 - no credit
        Great Cathedrals of the World: Mainz, BS#14, June 6, 1964 - no credit

        BS#15, June 13, 1964 - no GCotW
        BS#16, June 20, 1964, 1964 - no GCotW
        Great Cathedrals of the World: Pisa, BS#17, June 27, 1964, 1964 - no credit
        Great Cathedrals of the World: St Peter's, Rome, BS#18, July 4, 1964 - no credit

        BS#19, July 11, 1964 - no GCotW
        Great Cathedrals of the World: Ely, BS#20, July 18th, 1964 - Michael Moorcock
        Great Cathedrals of the World: Salisbury, BS#21, July 25, 1964 - no credit
        BS#22, Aug 1, 1964 - no GCotW
        Great Cathedrals of the World: Llandaff, BS#23, August 8, 1964 - no credit
        Great Cathedrals of the World: Hereford, BS#24, August 15, 1964 - Michael Oakley
        Great Cathedrals of the World: Exeter, BS#25, August 22, 1964 - Michael Moorcock
        Great Cathedrals of the World: Lincoln, BS#26, August 29, 1964 - no credit
        BS#27, Sept 5, 1964 - no GCotW
        Great Cathedrals of the World: Bury St. Edmunds, BS#28, September 12, 1964 - Michael Moorcock
        BS#29, Sept 19, 1964 - no GCotW
        Last edited by David Mosley; 09-01-2006, 11:43 PM.

        Comment


        • #5
          Nice going Guy. Hopefully Mike can remember which ones he worked on so we can have a 'definitive' list. :)

          Also, Bible Story related, Mike's said that his Life of Constantine and Life of Alexander appeared there as well. Looking through the Contents listings on the site I've previously mentioned, I don't see anything that I recognise as those works. There is something in #22 called 'Alexander at Issus' which is a pictorial illustrated by Peter Jackson, which might be related. Can you help shed any light?
          _"For an eternity Allard was alone in an icy limbo where all the colours were bright and sharp and comfortless.
          _For another eternity Allard swam through seas without end, all green and cool and deep, where distorted creatures drifted, sometimes attacking him.
          _And then, at last, he had reached the real world – the world he had created, where he was God and could create or destroy whatever he wished.
          _He was supremely powerful. He told planets to destroy themselves, and they did. He created suns. Beautiful women flocked to be his. Of all men, he was the mightiest. Of all gods, he was the greatest."

          Comment


          • #6
            Alexander at Issus is a one-off article, not credited to Mike; .

            I've said before that there is no Life of Constantine in BS, and it's my feeling that it may have been prepared for BS and perhaps later appeared in Look and Learn after BS folded, and was merged into Look and Learn (usual Brit comics trick to boost circulation of a "sister" comic a bit after you go down the tubes).

            So that would likley have been latter part of '64 or '65.

            Look and Learn owners might care to check their piles.

            (Or have their doctor do it...)

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by GuyLawley
              I've said before that there is no Life of Constantine in BS, and it's my feeling that it may have been prepared for BS and perhaps later appeared in Look and Learn after BS folded, and was merged into Look and Learn (usual Brit comics trick to boost circulation of a "sister" comic a bit after you go down the tubes).
              Ah yes, now that you mention it I remember you posting that before now.

              So that would likley have been latter part of '64 or '65.

              Look and Learn owners might care to check their piles.
              I've had a trawl through an (incomplete) listing of the Contents of L&L from 19/09/64 to 24/09/66 and haven't seen anything referencing Constantine there. Mind you there are some pretty big gaps where they don't have any information so none of that is conclusive.

              http://contento.best.vwh.net/paper/t213.htm

              I know from reading David Bishop's history of 2000AD that publishers often commission stuff that ends up sitting in drawers for years before its finally used. Turns out IPC/Fleetway had a policy of always using stuff that had been paid for even if it was crap - which explains why there was so much 'murky brown' artwork in 2000AD for so long. They kept finding pages that had been hidden away by previous editors once they had actually seen the finished product. :lol:

              But I digress.... :)
              _"For an eternity Allard was alone in an icy limbo where all the colours were bright and sharp and comfortless.
              _For another eternity Allard swam through seas without end, all green and cool and deep, where distorted creatures drifted, sometimes attacking him.
              _And then, at last, he had reached the real world – the world he had created, where he was God and could create or destroy whatever he wished.
              _He was supremely powerful. He told planets to destroy themselves, and they did. He created suns. Beautiful women flocked to be his. Of all men, he was the mightiest. Of all gods, he was the greatest."

              Comment


              • #8
                I found this at our sister publication, Fantastic Metropolis:

                From: The Bayley-Moorcock Letters

                Originally posted by Michael Moorcock

                Michael Moorcock: Your memory of all this is clearer than mine. I remember how stimulated I was by your intellectual ideas. I had never met anyone before who thought naturally like a philosopher! And who understood advanced scientific ideas so thoroughly. I am pretty sure that if I began as �commercial’, any early ambitions I got to do something else were a good deal inspired by you. We lived and worked together after I came back from Sweden. We tried to collaborate on a novella for Carnell called Duel Among The Wine Green Suns. Parts of this found their way into The Sundered Worlds and parts into The Final Programme. You, of course, invented DUEL, the mighty computer, for �Duel Among the Wine Green Suns,’ which I lifted whole for FP. But you also turned me on to the possibilities of computers and we used to discuss those huge cryogenic giants with awe, never quite realising we’d actually have a version in our own homes one day. Most of our collaborations, in fact, were exactly what I said—commercial. We did a lot of work together for the Fleetway Magazines. We did science, historical and natural history articles for Look and Learn and I wrote �The Life of Constantine the Great’ for Bible Story Weekly. I had the practical instincts, I suppose, of a working journalist. I expected to make a living from my writing. It was my job. Our first sale to New Worlds was a collaboration, too—was it �Going Home’?—and didn’t we also collaborate on a story published under Hilary Bailey’s name? Carnell had a prejudice against your work, so I suggested you use a pseudonym. You used the name of a friend. As I recall Carnell started buying your stories at once and sent the money to the friend. Not all that money came to you in the end! And when, as a kind of proof of his prejudice, I revealed to Carnell that this was really Barrington Bayley his response was �well I still don’t like Bayley’s work.’ So you were stuck with your dodgy friend. We lived together for a bit—or if you prefer, I squatted on your floor. We used to go to The Swan in Knightsbridge, near the offices of Chemistry and Industry, where Ballard worked, and meet once or twice a week to discuss how awful sf was, how awful modern fiction was, and what we could do with it. Do you remember persuading Carnell to run The Terminal Beach? The excitement with which we first read The Drowned World? Do you remember when you first met Ballard?

                Barrington J. Bayley: Yes, I can see that we complemented each a great deal. I benefited rather more than you did, I think.
                Source: http://fantasticmetropolis.com/show.html?iw,bayley,2
                The cat spread its wings and flew high into the air, hovering to keep pace with them as they moved cautiously toward the city. Then, as they climbed over the rubble of what had once been a gateway and began to make their way through piles of weed-grown masonry, the cat flew to the squat building with the yellow dome upon its roof. It flew twice around the dome and then came back to settle on Jhary's shoulder. - The King of the Swords

                Comment


                • #9
                  Here's a question for Mike (or anyone else I guess)...

                  According to a number of sources (not least this very thread), Mike's comic strip, 'Kit Carson's Perilous Ride', featured in Cowboy Picture Library #337 (dated Jan 1960), but according to this listing of CPL, 'Kit Carson's Perilous Ride!' appeared in CPL #321 (dated Sept. 1959).

                  This is the cover of CPL #321:

                  "featuring (a) Kit Carson & the Great Darkness!; (b) Kit Carson's Perilous Ride!; (c) Buffalo Bill & the Mighty Medicine Wizard!"

                  and this is the cover of CPL #337


                  Unfortunately, the site with the #321 details doesn't have a copy of #337 listed so I don't know what the contents might be. Can anyone confirm or disprove this new source?

                  ETA: Further research suggests the lead strip in #337 was called 'The Fighting Peacemaker'
                  Last edited by David Mosley; 08-03-2011, 03:34 AM.
                  _"For an eternity Allard was alone in an icy limbo where all the colours were bright and sharp and comfortless.
                  _For another eternity Allard swam through seas without end, all green and cool and deep, where distorted creatures drifted, sometimes attacking him.
                  _And then, at last, he had reached the real world – the world he had created, where he was God and could create or destroy whatever he wished.
                  _He was supremely powerful. He told planets to destroy themselves, and they did. He created suns. Beautiful women flocked to be his. Of all men, he was the mightiest. Of all gods, he was the greatest."

                  Comment

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