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Bible Story

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  • GuyLawley
    replied
    Originally posted by Marca View Post
    Does anyone know where it might be possible to source an original Bible Story binder, as advertised in the magazine? I have a pile of the mags in nice condition crying out for somewhere to be safely housed. I suppose ebay would be the most likely place, but I don't much fancy the odds of a binder being available on its own...
    I have a binder spare, in slightly trashed condition, but solid and it works.
    It also houses a full set of the magazine which you won't want, but you're welcome to the missing issues to complete your set.

    If you PM me I'll try to remember to get back to you after my holiday next week (the rest of this week will be manic!). Back in action from the 7th of October-ish. If you haven't heard from me by the 10th PM again. I think my e-mail has changed since we last corresponded, not sure, you could try.

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  • David Mosley
    replied
    Following on from discussions in another thread...
    Originally posted by JohnDavey View Post
    Cathedrals: I can definitely confirm that Mike wrote the cathedral features for Durham (issue #11), Worcester (#12), Ely (#20), Salisbury (#21), Peterborough (didn't appear [in 'B.S.']), Exeter (#25), Lincoln (#26), Bury St. Edmund's (#28) and St. Alban's (didn't appear [in 'B.S.']), plus a piece called 'To School On Sunday' (#27).
    I've uploaded Mike's piece on Lincoln cathedral and his article on Sunday Schools to the Image Hive.

    I've also added the in-magazine Index entry on the Great Cathedrals articles that appeared in BS #27:

    (First number refers to the Issue; the second to the page therein.)

    Leave a comment:


  • Marca
    replied
    Does anyone know where it might be possible to source an original Bible Story binder, as advertised in the magazine? I have a pile of the mags in nice condition crying out for somewhere to be safely housed. I suppose ebay would be the most likely place, but I don't much fancy the odds of a binder being available on its own...

    Leave a comment:


  • Michael Moorcock
    replied
    But I'm sure I saw the artwork reproduced! Could it have gone over to L&L ? Or into an annual ?

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  • philcom55
    replied
    The end of Bible Story with it's 29th issue was completely unheralded (there wasn't even the obligatory 'Great News!' announcement on the cover) and must have been something of a shock to regular readers. The only indication that their magazine was ceasing publication immediately came with a recommendation on page 11 that they should place a regular order for 'Look & Learn incorporating The Bible Story' from the following week. Even more remarkably, the issue of Look & Learn in question contained no reference to Bible Story whatsoever, apart from the fact that a few panels from Part Four of Robert Forrest's 'Life of Joseph' were squeezed into a single page without explanation. Thereafter a few more panels from Bible Story's inventory appeared in a desultory fashion, but they were often poorly presented in black and white, and after a few weeks even they dried up: it was as though the magazine had never existed.

    Fortunately Don Lawrence's marvelous adaptation of 'Herod the Great' was spared any of these depredations by reaching a natural conclusion in the final issue. However, his colour work had proved to be such a revelation that one can easily imagine Fleetway's editors eagerly lining up have him draw strips for them - preferably with the same historical flavour involving dashing swordsmen and glorious generals leading their troops into battle. Sure enough, the 1965 Lion Annual went on sale soon after this with his gorgeous version of Mike's Karl the Viking story 'Ghost of the Tideless Sea', and the following year he began his long association with Mike Butterworth's neo-Roman epic 'The Rise and Fall of the Trigan Empire'.

    Of course, if The Bible Story hadn't unexpectedly folded in September 1964 a strip about the life of Constantine the Great would have seemed like the perfect sequel to Herod (indeed, Bob Bartholomew freely admitted that it was standard practice for Fleetway editors to keep their best artists busy at all times to prevent anyone else stealing them) - thus it's easy to imagine that Ted Holmes would have already set the wheels in motion to produce such a series before the corporate axe fell.

    One intriguing indication that 'Constantine' was already in the works can be inferred from the fact that, while the first Christian Emperor doesn't get a single mention in Bible Story's index to the first 27 issues, the next-to-last feature in the final issue is a page entitled 'In the City of Constantine'. This is all the more suggestive when one remembers that many of the 'Herod' centre-spreads were preceded by a black and white page giving background information about that week's episode!

    Sadly it looks as though Bible Story was yet one more casualty of what Mike has called the 'Big Knockover' which toppled Britain's once-thriving comics publishers during the 1960s as though they were a row of dominoes. And while I still haven't given up hope that 'Constantine' might yet turn up in some obscure annual I'm afraid that it's far more likely to have been 'buried' in some vast storehouse beneath Fleet Street that made the one at the end of Citizen Kane seem like a left-luggage office...!

    - Phil Rushton
    Last edited by philcom55; 05-17-2011, 11:24 AM.

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  • Michael Moorcock
    replied
    Might not have appeared, Phil, as you say. It wouldn't be the only time that happened. But I've got a memory of some of the artwork -- Constantine seeing the three balls forming a cross etc. I'm certain it was for Bible Story but it might have been done in an annual. I wish Ted Holmes was still about. I did all my L&L and BS stuff for him.

    Leave a comment:


  • philcom55
    replied
    What an amazing site! As a new member I keep on stumbling across 'new' threads like this which I hadn't noticed before.

    The search for 'Constantine the Great' really is quite baffling: I've got the full run of Bible Story (the most likely magazine to commission such a series) and all the issues of Look & Learn that might have contained it; yet I can't find anything remotely similar (in these or any of the annuals from the same period). Bearing this in mind it's understandable that some people assumed Don Lawrence's seven-part, full-colour 'Herod the Great' - a historical canvas which allowed him to depict the clash of Roman arms in sumptuously painted detail - must have been the story Mike was thinking of. As it is I'm pretty certain that if any Constantine strip with Lawrence artwork had made it into print it would have long since been identified and catalogued by his legion of ferociously dedicated Dutch archivists.

    Unfortunately this raises the depressing possibility that the script which Mike remembers may have been written (and possibly even drawn) - but that it was mislaid and left forever unpublished when Bible Story was abruptly cancelled with its 29th issue! :-(

    If anybody’s interested I’d be happy to upload other pages from Bible Story. Sadly we may never know for sure which were Mike’s - but it would at least give people a clearer picture of the market he was working for. In particular, there was some stunning artwork by the likes of Lawrence, Peter Jackson, James McConnell, Robert Forrest and Patrick Nicolle (not to mention a fantastically talented painter who simply went by the signature ‘Hayes’).

    - Phil Rushton
    Last edited by philcom55; 05-11-2011, 05:05 AM.

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  • Michael Moorcock
    replied
    Sales were actually very good to start with. Edited by Ted Holmes, a friend of mine, who is frequently uncredited as a Fleetway (AP) innovator since his colleague Leonard Matthews did all the interviews and credited himself with almost everything which was good at Amalgamated Press!
    I SHOULD be in those early issues. Interesting thing about the magazine was that everyone who worked on Bible STory was either an agnostic or an atheist, including the vicar who was the titular editor! Probably the Sunday Schools, at whom it was aimed, caught on to this. Or maybe it was just too general and some denominations (Baptists, for isntance) fell away. If you find Constantine, The First Christian Emperor, drawn by Don Lawrence, in there, that's me. I also did a feature on The Church Army and maybe also on The Salvation Army. I know I did several interviews with representatives of such organisations. Can't remember if I did St Barts, but it IS very likely. I'd probably have to look at issues to know what was me and what wasn't and even then I can be occasionally unreliable.

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  • Marca
    replied
    Just got hold of a whole run of Bible Story, issues 1-19 off ebay. Some are torn and have paper loss, with issue 13 being the worst (ha!). Shame the run stops just before issue 20, with Mike's credited piece in there, but they are nice to have. I can't help wondering if Mike wrote the piece on the church of St. Bartholomew The Great?

    It's actually a much more interesting magazine than I thought it would be, wonder what the sales figures were like? It didn't last very long, did it? It's the sort of thing I'd have liked to have read as a kid...

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  • GuyLawley
    replied
    I bet he only claimed for the uncredited ones (of which there are many)!

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  • Michael Moorcock
    replied
    Bloody hell! Rumbled. Lucky for a certain friend that the inland revenue didn't read Bible Story... :)

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  • GuyLawley
    replied
    Despite current trouble at t'Image Gallery, Berry has repaired my scans of the second and third Great Cathedrals with a Moorcock credit, Exeter and Bury St Edmunds. (I know it's almost too exciting, isn't it?)

    They can be viewed here and on the following page:

    [link expired]

    Leave a comment:


  • Michael Moorcock
    replied
    I think they had a brief period of crediting contributors. Same happened with Boys World. In that case a Barry Bayley story was credited to me (or was it the other way round) since Barry and I used to work as a team and would often take up the others' commission. Generally, however, one relied on anonymity in those days!

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  • GuyLawley
    replied
    Originally posted by Michael Moorcock
    I didn't do the Herod strip. My guess it was done in house by an editor,
    maybe Ted Holmes, the original editor.
    Thanks as ever, Mike. I'll adjust the caption to the Herod scan idc.

    Like you I thought the crediting of one of the Cathedral series to you was a bit cheeky. Might be taken to imply that you had some interest in the subject or even went to services most Sundays.

    I take it the editors knew that was not really so. In which case, could the writing credit have been some subtle form of revenge? :)

    Just an idle thought! Not intended to use up your time in replying!

    Leave a comment:


  • Michael Moorcock
    replied
    A lot of stuff is wrongly credited to me, including Trigan Empire and Captain Condor, two old favourites of sf comic fans. I do my best to keep track of what's being offered as by me. Sometimes I feel a bit of a bastard for telling people that it's not me, after they arrive at a conclusion that it is! One thing this site is doing is helping me get dates straight in my head. I think it's pretty clear, for instance, that I didn't start editing Tarzan until I was 17, though I was contributing at 16.

    Leave a comment:

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