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Clovis Marca and the Beks?

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  • Clovis Marca and the Beks?

    In resarching the forthcoming Moorcockopedia entry on The Shores of Death I've come across the following exchange from the old Q&A:

    Originally posted by Michael Moorcock
    Originally posted by Mike Davey
    Mike, Much as I enjoy your work, I find the recent trend of changing character names in the reissues a little jarring. Old favourite characters like Shakey Mo Collier, Clovis Marca, Alan Powys, Renark Asquiol, etc, seem odd when they suddenly turn into Beks. Is this an artistic choice, or merely a marketing one? Thanks, Mike Davey
    I don't make many marketing choices! Since the characters are being used often to link one theme with another I've been trying to introduce a bit more coherence into the overall sequence, which means sometimes taking a prototype character and turning them into a more developed version. I'm sorry it upsets you, but I was trying to produce a series for readers who might be reading for the first time and these changes, in consultation with John Davey, seemed a good idea. I didn't think it was far removed from my usual methods, anyway! All best, Mike
    [link expired]

    I'm guessing that Clovis Marca was 'Bek-tified' for the Roads Between the Worlds omnibus from White Wolf, which never appeared in the UK? If so, could someone tell me by what name Clovis Marca is known in that edition please? Were any other revisions made to The Shores of Death (not counting the complete re-write from the original NW serialisation) that we know of?

    Cheers,
    David
    _"For an eternity Allard was alone in an icy limbo where all the colours were bright and sharp and comfortless.
    _For another eternity Allard swam through seas without end, all green and cool and deep, where distorted creatures drifted, sometimes attacking him.
    _And then, at last, he had reached the real world – the world he had created, where he was God and could create or destroy whatever he wished.
    _He was supremely powerful. He told planets to destroy themselves, and they did. He created suns. Beautiful women flocked to be his. Of all men, he was the mightiest. Of all gods, he was the greatest."

  • #2
    I don't think any other revisions were made and the UK Penguin edition, as far as I recall, kept the Clovis Marca name. I don't have any copies, of course, to hand here.

    Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in Europe:
    The Whispering Swarm: Book One of the Sanctuary of the White Friars - The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction
    Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles - Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - Modem Times 2.0 - The Sunday Books - The Sundered Worlds


    Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in the USA:
    The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction - The Sunday Books - Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles
    Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - The Sundered Worlds - The Winds of Limbo - Modem Times 2.0 - Elric: Swords and Roses

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    • #3
      Thanks Mike. I've established from a review on Amazon.com that Marca is renamed 'Clovis Becker' in the White Wolf edition, so that clears up that question.

      Elsewhere you've said that one of the characters in the story was based on Mervyn Peake - or a version of him at least. Would I be correct in thinking that that would the artist Alodios? If so, do you recall what it was about Peake that led you to cast him in that way? (Or should we just wait for the Peake memoir to come out? :)).

      Cheers,
      David
      _"For an eternity Allard was alone in an icy limbo where all the colours were bright and sharp and comfortless.
      _For another eternity Allard swam through seas without end, all green and cool and deep, where distorted creatures drifted, sometimes attacking him.
      _And then, at last, he had reached the real world – the world he had created, where he was God and could create or destroy whatever he wished.
      _He was supremely powerful. He told planets to destroy themselves, and they did. He created suns. Beautiful women flocked to be his. Of all men, he was the mightiest. Of all gods, he was the greatest."

      Comment


      • #4
        There are interesting variations between the revised UK and US editions of the EC series. In A Dead Singer, for example, in the Earl Aubec volume Shakey Mo is still Shakey Mo in the UK but is Mo Beck in the White Wolf edition.

        It may be a bit disconcerting for some of us older readers but newer ones wouldn't know any different. Has this kind of revision has been done by any other authors?
        'You know, I can't keep up with you. If I hadn't met you in person, I quite honestly would NOT believe you really existed. I just COULDN'T. You do so MUCH... if half of what goes into your zines is to be believed, you've read more at the age of 17 than I have at the age of 32 - LOTS more'

        Archie Mercer to Mike (Burroughsania letters page, 1957)

        Comment


        • #5
          Parallaxadaisical in the best sense of the non-word. First time I read the re-do on...Jade Man's Eyes I think, it gave me a plesant attack of vertigo.

          Cabell revised a quite a bit, but nothing in the nature of or to the degree that Mr. M does. Can't lay my hand on it just now, but there is a book tracing the changes to The Cream of the Jest that is pretty interesting.
          "A man is no man who cannot have a fried mackerel when he has set his mind on it; and more especially when he has money in his pocket to pay for it." - E.A. Poe's NICHOLAS DUNKS; OR, FRIED MACKEREL FOR DINNER

          Comment


          • #6
            A M'pedia entry on The Shores of Death (the novel version at any rate) is now online at http://www.multiverse.org/modules.ph...content&tid=42, where it also joins the first entry in the 'Stormbringer' novellas: Dead God's Homecoming (http://www.multiverse.org/modules.ph...content&tid=41).

            (As always, errors, omissions and corrections to the usual address please. :))

            Hope to have an entry for the New Worlds version of Shores up before too long, as well as the next Elric novella, Black Sword's Brothers, although I need to prepare my 'MRG' report on Shores first of course (check out Tanelorn in a short while for that hopefully). I half-expect to be throughly sick of The Shores of Death by the time I'm through with all this writing. :P
            _"For an eternity Allard was alone in an icy limbo where all the colours were bright and sharp and comfortless.
            _For another eternity Allard swam through seas without end, all green and cool and deep, where distorted creatures drifted, sometimes attacking him.
            _And then, at last, he had reached the real world – the world he had created, where he was God and could create or destroy whatever he wished.
            _He was supremely powerful. He told planets to destroy themselves, and they did. He created suns. Beautiful women flocked to be his. Of all men, he was the mightiest. Of all gods, he was the greatest."

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Aral Vilsn
              It may be a bit disconcerting for some of us older readers but newer ones wouldn't know any different.
              New readers who get the new versions, at least. I'm quite a new reader, but the name change came as a surprise to me as well. I've got some of the White Wolf omnibuses, but tried to spare them in favour of the second hand paperbacks my bookstore raids turn up. Ah well, the definitive Moorcock reading experience is a hopeless quest anyway.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Shadowheart
                Ah well, the definitive Moorcock reading experience is a hopeless quest anyway.
                I have an old Interlinear Bible that lists the variations between the Authorized and Revised versions on separate lines in the text, even down to the slightest changes in punctuation, and this was years before the dawn of Information Technology. In the 21st Century, is it too much to hope that one day we might have an Interlinear Moorcock, listing textual variations? :)
                'You know, I can't keep up with you. If I hadn't met you in person, I quite honestly would NOT believe you really existed. I just COULDN'T. You do so MUCH... if half of what goes into your zines is to be believed, you've read more at the age of 17 than I have at the age of 32 - LOTS more'

                Archie Mercer to Mike (Burroughsania letters page, 1957)

                Comment


                • #9
                  I suppose there's a chance of technology advancing to such a point (though I'm not sure the human mind will be able to encompass it)... however, I'm sure that when we have one Interlinear Moorcock we'll inevitable get multiple versions of it, published under alternate titles and collected in a number of different series each with a subtly different recommended reading order.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I think Balzac did a fair bit of revising. I'm not sure if it's worth tracking down these variants most of the time, though. Generally, all I've done is change names to fit into the 'family' which I really only started writing about in the late 70s/early 80s.

                    Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in Europe:
                    The Whispering Swarm: Book One of the Sanctuary of the White Friars - The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction
                    Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles - Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - Modem Times 2.0 - The Sunday Books - The Sundered Worlds


                    Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in the USA:
                    The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction - The Sunday Books - Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles
                    Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - The Sundered Worlds - The Winds of Limbo - Modem Times 2.0 - Elric: Swords and Roses

                    Comment

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