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Moorcock's legacy and inspiration

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  • Moorcock's legacy and inspiration

    I apologize if this information exists elsewhere. I'm new. The Elric, Corum and Dancers at the End of Time series had a huge impact on me when I was younger and read them.

    I've always wondered if Mr. Moorcock realized how revolutionary the Elric saga was when he was writing it?

    And, I've often heard in the past that much of the Elric saga was an allegory. An allegory involving a failed relationship? Anyone know if that's true?

  • #2
    Elric was to a degree about an early failed relationship, yes. Time's healed all that, so I scarcely remember it now. There was an element of self-examination and an element of self-dramatisation in those early stories, too. I knew that I was trying to do something which hadn't been done in recent fantasy genre fiction and I felt that Tolkien hadn't brought a sufficient sense of inevitable tragedy to a form which derived so much from mythology as well as from, say, Gothic fiction. Gothics -- especially Melmoth -- were a big influence, as were the Peninsula romances. I was writing Aspects of Fantasy at the same time as I was writing the early fantasy stories. Much of this still exists in Wizardry and Wild Romance and formed a sort of template for what I wanted to do in the Elric stories.
    They were, in that sense, much more consciously arrived at that most fantasy stories of their kind, in that I also had a fair idea of what are these days called the subtexts! That doesn't mean they were written with any less passion, of course. I have always been, however, a very conscious writer, which is why the Cornelius stories are as they are. I sort of assumed everyone of my generation was as conscious as I was. It turned out enough were, but by no means everyone!

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Michael Moorcock
      Elric was to a degree about an early failed relationship, yes. Time's healed all that, so I scarcely remember it now. There was an element of self-examination and an element of self-dramatisation in those early stories, too. I knew that I was trying to do something which hadn't been done in recent fantasy genre fiction and I felt that Tolkien hadn't brought a sufficient sense of inevitable tragedy to a form which derived so much from mythology as well as from, say, Gothic fiction. Gothics -- especially Melmoth -- were a big influence, as were the Peninsula romances. I was writing Aspects of Fantasy at the same time as I was writing the early fantasy stories. Much of this still exists in Wizardry and Wild Romance and formed a sort of template for what I wanted to do in the Elric stories.
      They were, in that sense, much more consciously arrived at that most fantasy stories of their kind, in that I also had a fair idea of what are these days called the subtexts! That doesn't mean they were written with any less passion, of course. I have always been, however, a very conscious writer, which is why the Cornelius stories are as they are. I sort of assumed everyone of my generation was as conscious as I was. It turned out enough were, but by no means everyone!
      First, let me just say that I meant no disrespect with the question about the past relationship. As I said, the saga had a huge impact on me and, reading it with that in mind, I often found myself relating it to similar events in my own life (I was a teenager at the time). In short, I found the Elric saga especially cathartic in that sense. Just wanted to make sure I wasn't fooling myself all those years ago!

      Second, I have to tell you what a privelege I consider it that you took the time to respond to me personally. Being a voracious reader and a long time fan of fantasy (some horror) you have always loomed very large in the landscape of my mind. It is a geniune delight to be able to communicate with you on any subject. Thanks for sharing your stories with the rest of us for so many years!!

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