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First Appearance of Lord Reynard?

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  • First Appearance of Lord Reynard?

    I'm reading The White Wolf's Son and really enjoying it! Given the expanded role of the foxy Lord Reynard in this book, I'm wondering if his bit part in The Dreamthief's Daughter was his first published showing in the Multiverse or if he originated in some other place than Elric's tales?

    He's right away leaving me longing for more, and seems deserving of a book or two of his own (which wouldn't even be renigging on the "no more Eternal Champion" books promise/threat, since he's obviously not an incarnation of the EC.)
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  • #2
    I don't know how this relates to TWWS - haven't had time to start reading it...Renard means fox in french. The name originates in a character, Renart, from the body of texts known as Le roman de Renart, various authors, most of them anonymous, circa 1170 to 1250. The character's name replaced the old french word for fox, goupil. Both characters belong to an age-old tradition (I think Roman Antiquity, no data at hand now though) and have equivalents in germanic and norse traditions.
    Renart's arch-enemy is Ysengrin....the wolf. Renart almost always wins, using flattery and guile to subdue the violent, irreflexive Wolf.

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    • #3
      Michael was clearly mining that particular Franco-mythology then with the character. Nice to know. Still wondering when he first appeared in a Moorcock book or story though, but I'm sure that will be revealed soon as well...
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      • #4
        Renard also appears als "Reinicke" Fuchs or "Voss" in Middle High German texts around 1250 and is based on "Le roman de Renart". Goethe later wrote a fable based on the smart fox charcter "Reinicke Fuchs". And these stories were very popular in 19th century children's books. Here's a typical contempory depiction:
        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Reynard-the-fox.jpg
        Google ergo sum

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        • #5
          The first time I can remember Lord Renyard appearing in some of Mike's work was 'The City in the Autumn Stars' published in 1986. I don't know if he has appeared in any stories published before this date. I've only got the omnibus editions of the Eternal Champion series and I still have some of them to read. :oops:

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          • #6
            Renyard's pseudonyms also have something to do with Grimmelshausen, of course, L'Etranger. And his enthusiasm for the Encyclopaedists links him to his French roots, too.

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            • #8
              For those of you who love Geothe's correct answers:

              WHEN THE FOX DIES, HIS SKIN COUNTS.*

              (* The name of a game, known in English as "Jack's alight.")

              WE young people in the shade

              Sat one sultry day;
              Cupid came, and "Dies the Fox"

              With us sought to play.

              Each one of my friends then sat

              By his mistress dear;
              Cupid, blowing out the torch,

              Said: "The taper's here!"

              Then we quickly sent around

              The expiring brand;
              Each one put it hastily

              ln his neighbour's hand.

              Dorilis then gave it me,

              With a scoffing jest;
              Sudden into flame it broke,

              By my fingers press'd.

              And it singed my eyes and face,

              Set my breast on fire;
              Then above my head the blaze

              Mounted ever higher.

              Vain I sought to put it out;

              Ever burned the flame;
              Stead of dying, soon the Fox

              Livelier still became.

              1770.
              The cat spread its wings and flew high into the air, hovering to keep pace with them as they moved cautiously toward the city. Then, as they climbed over the rubble of what had once been a gateway and began to make their way through piles of weed-grown masonry, the cat flew to the squat building with the yellow dome upon its roof. It flew twice around the dome and then came back to settle on Jhary's shoulder. - The King of the Swords

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              • #9


                I couldn't help but notice Mike's avatar, the crow, in this picture.

                And here is more information: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reynard
                The cat spread its wings and flew high into the air, hovering to keep pace with them as they moved cautiously toward the city. Then, as they climbed over the rubble of what had once been a gateway and began to make their way through piles of weed-grown masonry, the cat flew to the squat building with the yellow dome upon its roof. It flew twice around the dome and then came back to settle on Jhary's shoulder. - The King of the Swords

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                • #10
                  I've just updated the Wikipedia entry to include his Lordship! :)
                  \"...an ape reft of his tail, and grown rusty at climbing, who yet feels himself to be a symbol and the frail representative of Omnipotence in a place that is not home.\" James Branch Cabell

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                  • #11
                    Originally posted by Mikey_C
                    I've just updated the Wikipedia entry to include his Lordship! :)
                    Hello, 80.3.160.7!

                    Cheers,
                    Ant

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                    • #12
                      I wonder, then, if Baron Meliadus would be Lord Reynard's counterpoint?
                      The cat spread its wings and flew high into the air, hovering to keep pace with them as they moved cautiously toward the city. Then, as they climbed over the rubble of what had once been a gateway and began to make their way through piles of weed-grown masonry, the cat flew to the squat building with the yellow dome upon its roof. It flew twice around the dome and then came back to settle on Jhary's shoulder. - The King of the Swords

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                      • #13
                        Wasn't king Meliadus a character in one of the Knight of the Round Table stories?

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                        • #14
                          Knights, even.

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                          • #15
                            mmmmmmmm

                            Google

                            http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/eng/crt/crt15.htm

                            THERE was a certain kingdom called Lyonesse, and the King of that country was hight Meliadus, and the Queen thereof who was hight the Lady Elizabeth, was sister to King Mark of Cornwall.

                            In the country of Lyonesse, there was a very beautiful lady, who was a cunning and wicked sorceress. This lady took great love for King Meliadus, who was of an exceedingly noble appearance, and she meditated continually how she might bring him to her castle so as to have him near her.

                            Now King Meliadus was a very famous huntsman, and he loved the chase above all things in the world, excepting the joy he took in the love of his Queen, the Lady Elizabeth. So, upon a certain day, in the late autumn season he was minded to go forth a-hunting, although the day was very cold and bleak.

                            About the prime of the day the hounds started, of a sudden, a very wonderful stag. For it was white and its horns were gilded very bright, shining like pure gold, so that the creature itself appeared like a living miracle in the forest. When this stag broke cover, the hounds immediately set chase to it with a great outcry of yelling, as though they were suddenly gone frantic, and when the King beheld the creature, he also was immediately seized as with a great fury for chasing it. For, beholding it, he shouted aloud and drove spurs into his horse, and rushed away at such a pass that his court was, in a little while, left altogether behind him, and he and the chase were entirely alone in the forest.
                            The cat spread its wings and flew high into the air, hovering to keep pace with them as they moved cautiously toward the city. Then, as they climbed over the rubble of what had once been a gateway and began to make their way through piles of weed-grown masonry, the cat flew to the squat building with the yellow dome upon its roof. It flew twice around the dome and then came back to settle on Jhary's shoulder. - The King of the Swords

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