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Fears of surgery

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  • Fears of surgery

    I'm not a particularly regular poster on here - but I've not been too active of late, first with dealing with various immigration fiascos, and today with surgery.

    I Had surgery for the first time in my life. Quite a frightening prospect when you've been relatively 'disease free' all your life. The worry was oddly enough, mostly about being gassed. In that event, it didn't really materialise in the end - injectible anaesthetic mean't that the gas didn't really enter into the equation.

    Still not out of the woods - get some labwork to wait on from the docs. The thing was biopsy for raised neck glands, which the doc said needed to be checked out for possible lymphoma (more to rule that out I hope).

    Not the best time to be ill when you're a poor (recently legalised) immigrant in the US. Now I've got to work out how I'm going to pay for it - now its not free I really miss the NHS (for all its faults).

    So sitting here with several neck bandages and a voice like Clint Eastwood. Its easier to type than talk.
    Batman: It's a low neighborhood, full of rumpots. They're used to curious sights, which they attribute to alcoholic delusions.

    Robin: Gosh, drink is sure a filthy thing, isn't it? I'd rather be dead than unable to trust my own eyes!

  • #2
    I've said we must preserve the NHS and the BBC at all costs! One guarantees a citizenry free from fear of falling ill or having an accident.
    The other goes at least some way to supporting our democracy by doing its best to get plenty of quality information to the public. Both should be free of state control and subject to royal charter (if there's no other guarantee) to serve the public to the best of their ability. We fund it prudently but according to need, not according to what we can afford.
    I see too many examples of smart people under-informed and far too many decent working people of all kinds who cannot afford insurance or have only emergency insurance. It's a different world. A more fearful one. A less fearful one. The more we can maintain those institutions the better. There are, of course, virtues to American democracy unfamiliar to Brits, but by and large I find the quality of life in England very different to the quality of life here. However, though the French (and Canadian) system is a little closer to the American medicare system, the French and German systems seem by far the best. They have had longer to run a characteristically modern European system, which has traditionally funded the social services better than the modern American (and increasintly UK) system.
    My surgery has been good here (with one possible exception) and possibly of a higher standard than I could find in London, but I'm inclined to think I'd be even better off on the Continent.
    I do hope your recover speedily and forever. It's always a shock for healthy people suddenly to be struck by some kind of infirmity. I'm still outraged. :D

    Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in Europe:
    The Whispering Swarm: Book One of the Sanctuary of the White Friars - The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction
    Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles - Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - Modem Times 2.0 - The Sunday Books - The Sundered Worlds


    Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in the USA:
    The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction - The Sunday Books - Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles
    Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - The Sundered Worlds - The Winds of Limbo - Modem Times 2.0 - Elric: Swords and Roses

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    • #3
      Try having health insurance premiums so high at your job that you can't afford to cover your famlily and instead have to buy individual coverage through Blue cross blue shield!!! They don't cover maternity and they don't cover birth control. Through my work, family coverage would have been over $1000 a month (with my employer picking up half for just me, or $150). Privately it is almost 500, but the service is much worse because you have no bargaining power. I used to be against socialization of medicine on principal, but now I support it. I know if I paid 4-500 in taxes for medicine, the government's purchasing power would greatly increase the services I would recieve. Leave free markets to autos and widgets and whatnot, and let the government take care of medicine, roads, utilities, schools etc. Public interest should = paid for with public funds.

      Comment


      • #4
        I hope that's a lesson we'll all eventually learn, when we emerge from the current madness of the richest country in the world providing itself with a fraction of the opportunities to pursue happiness and the lowest 2uality of life in the G8. One thing I've learned -- in Europe and N. America at any rate -- is that the higher the taxes, the more money is for social services, the more social services, the happier the culture. Just because corporate capitalism wants ever penny it can get from us into the consumer system, it doesn't mean we should see their arguments as nothing more than attempts to persuade us to give up even more rights.
        Although I had a good (expensive) Blue Cross/Blue Shield insurance it was chepaer than the fabulous worldwide health insurance I had years ago! The quality of care in this country is often highly over-rated, what's more. While I've had great care in Austin, in the main, I've had some pretty awful care in California, for instance.

        Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in Europe:
        The Whispering Swarm: Book One of the Sanctuary of the White Friars - The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction
        Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles - Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - Modem Times 2.0 - The Sunday Books - The Sundered Worlds


        Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in the USA:
        The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction - The Sunday Books - Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles
        Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - The Sundered Worlds - The Winds of Limbo - Modem Times 2.0 - Elric: Swords and Roses

        Comment


        • #5
          One thing I've noticed when telling people in US about my need for surgery is that their first concern is for how much it will cost, as opposed to concern for my health. I find that a little perplexing to be honest 8O

          I'm keeping my fingers crossed for next week. The ironic thing is that the surgery wasn't strictly neccessary. I had raised lymph glands in my neck for the past 5-6 months with no obvious cause. After a bunch of tests the doc came up with the rather brilliant conclusion (actually that's kind of unfair - he seems to know what he's doing) that it could either be 'something or nothing'. Unfortunately the most serious 'something' is a lymphoma - which can only be diagnosed or ruled out pathologically. So I opted to listen to my body, if it turns out to be nothing that will allay my fears than spending time worrying about it being 'something'.

          Of course symptoms like these (where nothing obvious is wrong) probably put a lot of people off having things checked out - wheras with the NHS at least your decision isn't mentally preconditioned by how much it is going to cost (a silly argument really - I mean, money is meaningless if you're dead right?)

          An interesting side effect of being an immigrant is that unless you are independently wealthy or are married to someone fairly well off, health insurance is well beyond your means until you get a (decent) job. That of course can be difficult when employers appear to discriminate (to some regard) when faced with foreign job references. Its as though my 5 years Tech Writing experience in the UK counts for nothing!

          Another factor is that most insurance companies won't sign you up without a social security number, and depending how you go about the 'legal' immigration process that isn't something thats easy to obtain.
          Batman: It's a low neighborhood, full of rumpots. They're used to curious sights, which they attribute to alcoholic delusions.

          Robin: Gosh, drink is sure a filthy thing, isn't it? I'd rather be dead than unable to trust my own eyes!

          Comment


          • #6
            I wish you a speedy recovery, Devilchicken and hope your surgery was a complete waste of time (in that there's absolutely nothing wrong with you).

            When I lived in the UK I always found the NHS a bit of 'hit 'n' miss' in that some of the doctors were good and others truly awful. Here in Canada it's a lot better and the monthly premiums aren't too bad at about $50. Most times, your employer will cover it in any event.

            In my own experience I have had excellent results with so called 'alternative' medicine, in particular my chiropractor (who uses a 'soft touch' technique--no hard snaps or jerking you around) and naturopath. Raised glands can sometimes be a reaction to environmental conditions, such as various pollutants etc. It could also be a low grade flu virus that's gotten a hold. Medicine is a lot like trouble-shooting a computer glitch, you rule out everything in the hope that what's left points you in the right direction. Sounds like your doctor is on the ball.

            Once again, best of luck with everything and welcome to the 'New World' (!)

            Comment


            • #7
              My far too many recent dealings with hospitals and such have shown me that you get good and mediocre doctors in every system. The skills of the doctors are about the same. The fears of the patients are not. I was hugely impressed by the aftercare. for instance, my mother received in W.Sussex.

              Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in Europe:
              The Whispering Swarm: Book One of the Sanctuary of the White Friars - The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction
              Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles - Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - Modem Times 2.0 - The Sunday Books - The Sundered Worlds


              Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in the USA:
              The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction - The Sunday Books - Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles
              Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - The Sundered Worlds - The Winds of Limbo - Modem Times 2.0 - Elric: Swords and Roses

              Comment


              • #8
                Hope you recover really fast, and do go slowly after it for a while.
                Google ergo sum

                Comment


                • #9
                  I too had my first experience of surgery very recently, and it was, contrary to what many of the nay-sayers that have been standing upon their soapboxes in the recent election have been proclaiming (whilst looking quite uncomfortable at dealing with people directly) an overwhelmingly good experience.

                  The NHS is indeed something that needs to be treasured and cared for, not needlessly attacked, and certainly not privatised.

                  I too have had the discussion about costs of my healthcare with my online American friends, and it astounds me to hear that most would not have had the operation I had due to the costs involved, and the fact that I could have lived a fully-functioning, although slightly painful, life without it.

                  Further, the two surgeons involved, and the anaesthesiologist (all of whom were superb), were all immigrants. For those following the political climate in my country, you'll be aware of what this means.

                  Anyway, hope it all went well devilchicken, and may you never need to return.

                  :D

                  H.
                  Hapimeses.com

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Hesh

                    Try living in Brazil. Then you will all see what is a "medical issue".


                    Health insurance costs are above average citizens possibilites, and...
                    You better pray then go to a public hospital. Chances are you get worse on 'em.
                    At least in 90 % of the country, that is.
                    PS Hey, i'm back, after a long time absent because of 'moving reasons'
                    good to see ye all.

                    Hope you get better soon dchicken

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Thanks all - doing well, cept for some stiffness on the right side of my neck.

                      I'm now dealing with the interesting problem of how to wash and shave (for the next week) with tape over my neck that I'm not supposed to get wet.
                      Batman: It's a low neighborhood, full of rumpots. They're used to curious sights, which they attribute to alcoholic delusions.

                      Robin: Gosh, drink is sure a filthy thing, isn't it? I'd rather be dead than unable to trust my own eyes!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        At the risk of sounding both glib and up myself, veterinary healthcare is generally pitched to a higher standard than human med. No waiting lists, pathology results in twenty-four hours (routine) and near-non-existent MRSA!

                        And the food's better...And the nurses cuddle the patients! :lol:

                        I hope you all are better soon. I was only in hospital overnight once, and that pissed me off :?

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          And, of course, if I get serious kidney problems, you'll painstakingly despatch me while my loving family gather around my bedside.
                          Sounds good. And if I get myself pet insurance, it's even cheaper!

                          Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in Europe:
                          The Whispering Swarm: Book One of the Sanctuary of the White Friars - The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction
                          Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles - Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - Modem Times 2.0 - The Sunday Books - The Sundered Worlds


                          Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in the USA:
                          The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction - The Sunday Books - Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles
                          Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - The Sundered Worlds - The Winds of Limbo - Modem Times 2.0 - Elric: Swords and Roses

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I've had a few surgeries in my day. Never bothered me much (HA!). Well, at least not as much as the surgery my son just had. He had to have his leg operated on to help fight the necrotizing fasciitis (flesh-eating bacteria) he'd contracted. He's doing better now, thanks to the excellent care he received. :D Can't wait to see the bill though... Two surgeries so far, plus several days in ICU.

                            I've got some gruesome pictures if you're interested. 8O
                            Don\'t blame me; I voted for Trixitroxi Ro!

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Reading this thread I just realised that I've had three surgeries - all on my head! And two of those were on my eye! I would probably have had none of these if it wasn't for the NHS. It may be flawed (and that mainly because of government inteference) but it is still a valuable service.
                              You see, it's... it's no good, Montag. We've all got to be alike. The only way to be happy is for everyone to be made equal.

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