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Joe Libertarian - 'new' Heinlein novel

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  • #16
    Don't think so. I came to sf rather late, not liking anything until I read Bester's Tiger! Tiger! I missed most of the classic stuff and came to it too late to enjoy much of it..

    Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in Europe:
    The Whispering Swarm: Book One of the Sanctuary of the White Friars - The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction
    Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles - Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - Modem Times 2.0 - The Sunday Books - The Sundered Worlds


    Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in the USA:
    The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction - The Sunday Books - Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles
    Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - The Sundered Worlds - The Winds of Limbo - Modem Times 2.0 - Elric: Swords and Roses

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    • #17
      I picked up copies of Theodore Sturgeon's More Than Human, Roger Zelazny's The Doors of His Face, The Lamps of His Mouth and The Early Asimov: Volume 1., at the local recycling shop, today. Which was nice.

      I'm putting them away, on my science fiction bookshelf and getting out King of the City, this weekend. This may be my last chance to read it, before my partner has us remodelling the house.

      :)

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      • #18
        Pull out that copy quickly, Androman! It's a fantastic read on several levels. And Denny Dover might even take your photograph while you're reading it.

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        • #19
          I suppose good taste has stopped anyone mentioning the one bit of fairly accurate prediction in that book, Doc.
          Shortly after it was published I went into hospital and came out with a lot less foot than I went in...
          You probably have to live in a small seaside town now, if you want Denny to take your picture.
          Or at least an ideal world!

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          • #20
            You mean Rosie hasn't really taken over the corporate world? I didn't sign up for this world.

            Hopefully Denny has found that peaceful seaside town. Maybe it's on the outskirts of Tanelorn? Right beside of the good foot doctors.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by Doc
              Pull out that copy quickly, Androman! It's a fantastic read on several levels. And Denny Dover might even take your photograph while you're reading it.
              Last time, I stopped reading just before Maddy took hold of the big copper knocker. Tubby certainly throws some Thanksgiving!

              :)

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              • #22
                Gladiator sounds good - gotta read that soon. Also Zelazny's Lamps... - I've read most of the Amber books and enjoyed them very much. (Love that family infighting, it seems SO familiar.) And I love Woody Guthrie - he was a good prose writer, and I can unabashedly recommend Bound for Glory; he has a great author's voice.

                Overall, I really haven't read anyone I totally agree with when it come to societal structure. Guess that's one reason I write, huh? For instance, some of the stuff I and my partner take on in the Mudball series (which quite needs a publisher) are social basics (getting everyone fed and housed), penology (that the study of prisons, ya preverts!) and why they make so much money, pure research as an investment, and of course religion versus society. My/our take on the whole lot is a bit different and has some new solutions along with a bit of plot advancement. (Okay, I admit sinking Japan was just plain fun. I'm still stinging over some aspects of the '80's economic wars.)

                I guess this is why Heinlein was important to me. It's not that I agree with the man (as I've said, in most cases I do not). In most cases though, he got me thinking and focused on the issues. That in and of itself served me well through school, and more so when life demands opinions and actions.

                Now, don't feel left out, Mike. Your tales also inspire(d) me in many other ways, like the use of insight, the power of myth, and actual good solid writing. (Except for The Moon is a Harsh Mistress, RAH rarely used what writing chops he had.) I think two of the basic categories of writers are those who inspire the reader to write like them, and those who inspire readers to write because of them. (And this can be,as you see, either positive [as in more or expounding of the same] or negative [rebuttals and different ideas].) Your writing, Mike, has both elements, so it's a special joy.
                Miqque
                ... just another sailor on the seas of Fate, dogpaddling desperately ...

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