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The Mystery of the Black Blade

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  • News: The Mystery of the Black Blade

    Hmmmm.

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/...ef=mostpopular

  • #2
    Originally posted by Rob Hansen View Post
    agreed

    Comment


    • #3
      It's of Melnibonean origin and the inscription translates "please return to Elric".
      "He found a coin in his pocket, flipped it. She called: 'Incubus!'
      'Succubus,' he said. 'Lucky old me.'" - Michael Moorcock The Final Programme

      Comment


      • #4
        The inscription reads:

        +NDXOXCHWDRGHDXORVI+

        Or, in modern terminology,
        "Souls for Arioch!
        Copyright © 10, 191 Melnebonéan Era, Mournblade Technologies"
        Miqque
        ... just another sailor on the seas of Fate, dogpaddling desperately ...

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Miqque View Post
          The inscription reads:

          +NDXOXCHWDRGHDXORVI+

          Or, in modern terminology,
          "Souls for Arioch!
          Copyright © 10, 191 Melnebonéan Era, Mournblade Technologies"
          "If this sword should dare to roam
          Box its ears and send it home"
          The Witham runs through my town by the way.

          Comment


          • #6
            "I'm not the Black Sword, I'm a very naughty dagger."

            Comment


            • #8
              Since we're discussing a black blade, it occurs to me that newer members who weren't around back then might find this reworked page from four years ago amusing:

              http://www.multiverse.org/fora/showthread.php?t=24189

              Comment


              • #9
                Originally posted by Michael Moorcock View Post
                Could the inscription be related to Finnish ?
                You mean something like, "If I stab you you'll be finished"?

                I think it's early text speak for, "no damned socks, chewed right de sword violet".

                Comment


                • #10
                  The inscription is a spell of power that no one can read except the person who coded it.

                  However the purpose of this spell of power is now obvious: It creates confusion and perplexity and fear of the unknown on anyone who casts their eyes on it, a highly potent advantage in a sword fight to the death.
                  Last edited by Atticus; 08-16-2015, 02:43 PM.

                  Comment


                  • #11
                    The VI could be a six, in Latin numerals.

                    Comment


                    • #12
                      It's really quite simple. Basic Old Norse instructions, transliterated into the Roman alphabet for ease of inscription. Roughly translated, it reads:

                      "Pointy End Toward Enemy"

                      Comment


                      • #13
                        When you take the negative and play it backwards you can hear the following:

                        "A new life awaits you in the Off-World Colonies. The chance to begin again in a golden land of opportunity and adventure. Lets go to the Colonies!"
                        Infinite complexity according to simple rules.

                        Comment


                        • #14
                          SwordsRUs

                          The Witham also runs through where I'm currently incarnated. I've seen this sword in Lincoln Museum and it is very obviously a knight's broadsword, so a lot smaller than Stormbringer (and still very hefty). And it isn't really black, it's the colour you'd expect a sword to be.
                          It really, really is a runesword or in kiddyspeak, a magic (probably Christian magic) sword though.
                          The most interesting thing to me is - and there are several others from out of there, though this is the biggest and best - despite that, people - and very posh, at least potentially educated people - were carrying on an Iron Age religious practice of sacrificing things in water over 1,500 years later under a completely different and fairly intolerant religion.
                          It's comparable to but even more surprising than (from Fenland Notes and Queries) 19th century Lincolnshire "cunning folk" still praying to "Wod and Lok" - they were a secret and transgressive community. Knights weren't!

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                          • #15
                            While the Scottish highlands and islands are often seen as very strictly Christian, in the midst of all that has been a goodly mix of folklore (a.k.a. charms a.k.a. magic). A great wee team looking into such are the Carmichael Watson project at Edinburgh university.

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