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Granbretans and Extreme Fake-over

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  • Granbretans and Extreme Fake-over

    I read Hawkmoon a few months ago and these make-over shows (or fake-overs as I like to call them) that are popular now made me think of the Granbretans. The Granbretans wore masks, but the modern fad for cosmetic surgery seems like the same idea, only the mask becomes permanent.

    The Extreme Fake-over show just struck me as being like the Granbretans. Life imitating art or vice versa. Whatever way you want to look at it. With the Granbretans, Mr. M showed us an extreme society-- violent and vain and shallow-- and it seems to correlate more than ever with the modern trend to be something you're not. Sure, in the 70s we had the "Me" generation and unnatural creatures like Twiggy, but overall people didn't have to do as much to be considered attractive-- bathe daily, wear clean clothes, exercise, maybe add a bit of make-up and style the hair, but that was it for most people. Now mainstream society is pushing people to undergo excessive and unnatural alterations in order to be considered attractive. There are actually young women out there who think they have to get breast implants! It's like they think they need them to compete for male attention, like they are just a rite of passage to adulthood.

    The masks are becoming permanent. It's perverse. I know it isn't the majority of people who think this way, but just the fact that there are shows like "Extreme Make-over" to begin with attests to the fact that there are lots of people out there buying into it.

    This also makes me wonder who it is who is deciding what is the right nose to have, the right bra cup size, the right sort of foot to have (some people, whoever the hell they are, have deemed it wrong to have a second toe longer than the big toe. Some people have surgery to shorten the second toe and thus correct this "flaw".) It's as though "they" want to force us all into the same cookie-cutter mask, all fit one size. There seems to be a distain for Nature's diversity. Or perhaps they are just incapable of comprehending that diversity is natural.

    At any rate, it seems like the Granbretans are here, full force, only this time their masks are permanantly attached with the help of plastic surgeons.
    WWED -- What Would Elric Do?

  • #2
    I think the modern trend for plastic surgery is very strange. It will pass like all trends and in the future our descendents will be amazed that women, for example, thought they could make themselves more attractive by having globs of silicone inserted in their bodies. The (mainly) American fashion for facelifts is equally strange too. Whatever happened to growing old gracefully?

    And of course diversity in humans is beautiful. Who wants everybody to look the same?
    'You know, I can't keep up with you. If I hadn't met you in person, I quite honestly would NOT believe you really existed. I just COULDN'T. You do so MUCH... if half of what goes into your zines is to be believed, you've read more at the age of 17 than I have at the age of 32 - LOTS more'

    Archie Mercer to Mike (Burroughsania letters page, 1957)

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    • #3
      Re: Granbretans and Extreme Fake-over

      Originally posted by Marie-Bernadette
      I read Hawkmoon a few months ago and these make-over shows (or fake-overs as I like to call them) that are popular now made me think of the Granbretans. The Granbretans wore masks, but the modern fad for cosmetic surgery seems like the same idea, only the mask becomes permanent.
      That we are 'all natural' has really been forgotten by many people.
      Remember Parsifal asking that fateful question to the Fisher King?
      Conforming to a superficial elite strips us of our 'natural heritage of diversity', (and originality) as u said. There seems to be more of a striving identification for an "I" than a "Me" today i've heard?!
      (Whatever that means)?

      And "Be cheerfull! Dig in! Or someone might think you're weird".

      I think Biafra said it best with
      "The Marky Mark Master Race"

      Originally posted by Marie-Bernadette
      At any rate, it seems like the Granbretans are here, full force, only this time their masks are permanantly attached with the help of plastic surgeons.
      The self abuse persist's. I never see a spark or anything invigorating about people who've rubbed out their distinguishing features.
      And aren't these doctors better off helping people with REAL problems.
      The problems these people have are mostly connected to money and status.

      I understand people who do it because of some gross deformity.
      Or after and accident.

      But i think it is peoples pettiness that's most annoying.

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      • #4
        We don't have cable, but Linda got Nip and Tuck out of Blockbusters the other day. That's about the best argument against most plastic surgery I can think of!

        Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in Europe:
        The Whispering Swarm: Book One of the Sanctuary of the White Friars - The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction
        Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles - Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - Modem Times 2.0 - The Sunday Books - The Sundered Worlds


        Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in the USA:
        The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction - The Sunday Books - Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles
        Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - The Sundered Worlds - The Winds of Limbo - Modem Times 2.0 - Elric: Swords and Roses

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        • #5
          Originally posted by TheAdlerian
          In psychology we have a “do no harm� rule and could be judged on whether or not we anticipated bad outcomes. How is it that doctors can turn people into freaks of know that long-term harm could be created? On one show I saw a guy that had his face turned into a cat-like thing. The man could barely speak. What are the rules for these physicians?
          Well in a Ultra-Capitalist society.. Thats what i call it anyway.
          Privatized doctors are only selling a 'product' with the sometimes ignorant idiom being:

          "The customer is always right".

          This is a gross misconduct of the noble frase "To do no harm".

          So i'm one for separating healthcare from privitization.
          Capitalism can work if used sensibly and with respect.
          But the "Win-Win" situation capitalists always talk about is a lie really.

          Ayn Rands childish Objectivism strips man of his contemplative abilities of how he is affecting his world and his place in it.

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          • #6
            There was a documentary on UK TV recently (I forget the channel) talking about cosmetic surgery throughout ancient history, in ancient egyptian times for example. I think while looks are important to life, cosmetic surgery will be a route taken by some people.

            The thing that most sickens me in discussions on this area is that looks don't matter, it's the personality that shines through.. What if you don't have either, and covet both?! A good personality can be far more difficult to obtain than acceptable looks! Somewhere between gorgeous people and fascinating people there's a huge grey area of disinteresting ugly people which very few artists (except the cosmetic surgeons) cater for, wishing they could look in the mirror and see themselves in the role of their heroes. Bester, for instance, is the only author I can think of who took an ugly-looking, disinteresting character and made him, convincingly, a hero. Although he didn't really celebrate the ugly disinteresting person, he at least made heroism from these origins possible.

            All 'advanced' civilisations through history seem to have been pretty superficial. Aspiring to godliness. If only those damn Romans hadn't come along we in the UK might be happily traipsing around in our mud huts, squeezing clay plates into our lips to exchange for cows when we get married. But instead we got soap, bubble baths, sewage systems and inferiority complexes.. Bastards! Otherwise we could be cavorting around eden waggling our crown jewels at the moon, innocent and ugly as each other! Before being annihilated by a nuke on suspicion of anarchy, drug trafficking and arrow stashes..

            I doubt its simply a fad, although certainly in the future it might become so perfected through genetic selection that people will begin to use cosmetic surgery to roughen themselves up a bit, rather imperfectly ;-)

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            • #7
              I can go for that, I remember John Cleese presenting a docu on beauty with liz hurley, and by using a 'ratio' of beauty they produced a kind of blueprint, placed it over plain and beautiful faces, and the more technically beautiful the face, irrespective of what type they are, the more exactly they would fall into this ratio, and plainer faces wouldn't (including an amused John Cleese). Fitting into this cast however, didn't necessarily delineate between attractive and less attractive, it was more the idealisation of an individual type. It was still in the eye of the beholder to determine which striking characteristics and imperfections were preferable to it. Half the point of the face is to reflect the kind of person that's wearing it (as well as the person inside reflecting the kind of face they were born with), along with facial indications of illness and disease to put budding mates off (or indication of good diet, health, exercise etc. to turn them on), so it makes sense that a certain amount of attraction is in the eye of the beholder, compatibility and whatnot. Furthermore, this ratio continued beyond, onto flowers, animals etc.. Anything for whom beauty had a use, aspired to it.

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