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Nomad reprints from Titan Books in 2013

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  • Nomad reprints from Titan Books in 2013

    There will be a reprint of The Warlord of the Air in January 2013, published by Titan Books. You can see the new cover art here.

  • #2
    thats a pretty neat cover!

    Comment


    • #3
      Well, it's cheap. That's the first I've seen of it. Usually I'm in contact with designer and editor, but not here, it seems... It'll be good to have it out again.

      Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in Europe:
      The Whispering Swarm: Book One of the Sanctuary of the White Friars - The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction
      Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles - Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - Modem Times 2.0 - The Sunday Books - The Sundered Worlds


      Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in the USA:
      The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction - The Sunday Books - Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles
      Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - The Sundered Worlds - The Winds of Limbo - Modem Times 2.0 - Elric: Swords and Roses

      Comment


      • #4
        Have you made any revisions to this round of reprints, Mike? Or will you be using the Millenium/White Wolf versions of the text? (Which, I believe, are now the preferred ones)
        Last edited by Governor of Rowe Island; 03-22-2012, 01:31 PM.
        You see, it's... it's no good, Montag. We've all got to be alike. The only way to be happy is for everyone to be made equal.

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        Image Hive :-: Wikiverse :-: Media Hive

        :-: Onsite Offerings :-:


        "I am an observer of life, a non-participant who takes no sides. I am in the regimented society, but not of it." Moondog, 1964

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        • #5
          No significant changes, Gov. Basically, we'll be using the WW revisions. The Elric series will be published according to the internal chronology, not the order of publication, though we'll probably keep some of the features in the Del Rey editions.

          Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in Europe:
          The Whispering Swarm: Book One of the Sanctuary of the White Friars - The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction
          Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles - Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - Modem Times 2.0 - The Sunday Books - The Sundered Worlds


          Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in the USA:
          The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction - The Sunday Books - Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles
          Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - The Sundered Worlds - The Winds of Limbo - Modem Times 2.0 - Elric: Swords and Roses

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Michael Moorcock View Post
            No significant changes, Gov. Basically, we'll be using the WW revisions. The Elric series will be published according to the internal chronology, not the order of publication, though we'll probably keep some of the features in the Del Rey editions.
            Don't mean to be disrespectful but the words, 'Make your mind up!' tend to come to mind. Personally I think the right order for the Elric books is everything up to Sailor on the Seas of Fate in order of internal chronology and everything after that in order of publication. In other words what was there when I started reading them is canon and everything after that is apocrypha. It makes as much sense as any other approach expect in so far as it doesn't.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Jussi View Post
              There will be a reprint of The Warlord of the Air in January 2013, published by Titan Books. You can see the new cover art here.
              New edition of The Land Leviathan is coming out in April 2013.

              Comment


              • #8
                Looks like they're going for a triptych-style* effect with the covers:



                *Possibly even a 'wrap-around' effect judging by that protrusion on the far left-hand side.
                Last edited by David Mosley; 04-10-2013, 03:08 AM. Reason: Change image location to Hive
                _"For an eternity Allard was alone in an icy limbo where all the colours were bright and sharp and comfortless.
                _For another eternity Allard swam through seas without end, all green and cool and deep, where distorted creatures drifted, sometimes attacking him.
                _And then, at last, he had reached the real world – the world he had created, where he was God and could create or destroy whatever he wished.
                _He was supremely powerful. He told planets to destroy themselves, and they did. He created suns. Beautiful women flocked to be his. Of all men, he was the mightiest. Of all gods, he was the greatest."

                Comment


                • #9
                  New cover art from Titan Books:

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    And, lo! That triptych cover in full:

                    _"For an eternity Allard was alone in an icy limbo where all the colours were bright and sharp and comfortless.
                    _For another eternity Allard swam through seas without end, all green and cool and deep, where distorted creatures drifted, sometimes attacking him.
                    _And then, at last, he had reached the real world – the world he had created, where he was God and could create or destroy whatever he wished.
                    _He was supremely powerful. He told planets to destroy themselves, and they did. He created suns. Beautiful women flocked to be his. Of all men, he was the mightiest. Of all gods, he was the greatest."

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Review | The Warlord of the Air | ManArchy

                      Review of Titan Books edition of The War Lord of the Air by Edward J Rathke:
                      The Warlord of the Air by Michael Moorcock, first released over forty years ago, is fun. It is one of the most enjoyable reading experiences I have had in a long while. Now being re-released by Titan Books, it is one of the first examples of steampunk, an alternate history of the 20th century where imperialism succeeded and the great powers live in a utopia, where pirates and anarchists and airships fill the skies. It is a wild adventure that has a bit more going on between the lines and a great deal to say about society and humanity.

                      Framed by the papers of Michael Moorcock (the author’s fictional grandfather) in 1903 as he is recuperating on an island and meets a disoriented young Oswald Bastable, who tells him of this fantastic voyage into a future distinct from our own and unimaginable to even him. From there, we dive into Bastable’s tale of the future, where he falls in love with England’s vision of a perfect civilisation, where much of the globe is divided between the world powers and there has been no war for a hundred years. He enters into this seductive life, passing himself as an amnesiac, which he reasons is more reasonable than a timetraveller. The beginnings of his journey are somewhat slow as much time is given to exploring a world so unfamiliar to him but also strange to us, in its reflection of our own society but also in its depiction of how the world would be had we stuck to ideas of racial superiority and manifest destiny and the white man’s burden. But from these slow beginnings, the novel takes on some very interesting turns.

                      A revolutionary pirate dreams of equality and gathers the world’s intellectuals into a sprawling anarchic society poised to fight off the empires that live in such grandeur by destroying and subjugating the rest of the world, from China to South America. What began as an interesting voyage becomes a revolutionary war where dirigibles and atom bombs erupt, where Ronald Reagan is a brutish boy scout, where the Vladimir Lenin is a failed and despondent old man.

                      And so while The Warlord of the Air is, on the surface, a simple yet energetic tale, it also has a lot to say about the world. A political book, certainly, but it should not impede any enjoyment of this. I mean, there are airship pirates, a satirical look at English society, tribalism, mystics, communists, anarchists, explosions, accidental time travel, wars between giant airships, Ronald Reagan dressed as a boy scout, opium addicts, subterfuge, and airships.

                      Michael Moorcock begins this trilogy of steampunk timetravel slowly but it really picks up its pace near the halfway point, when Bastable’s worldview is turned inside out and upside down, where jumping forward in time causes you to relook at the world you came from, where being human is more than simply where or when you’re from. And on top of all that, the novel is filled with humor and action.
                      The Warlord of the Air is just too much fun to dislike. It is not a book that will change your life or even change the way you see the world, but it might be a place to start.
                      manarchymag.com/2013/01/review.../author-eddyrathke
                      Last edited by David Mosley; 01-10-2013, 04:49 PM.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Exclusive: Michael Moorcock Talks New Novel The Warlord of the Air | dreadcentral.com

                        The Warlord of the Air by Michael Moorcock is now available from most major retailers for the MSRP of $9.95. We recently spoke with the author to get more details regarding the series that all science fiction fans will want to check out. Read on to learn more!

                        AMANDA DYAR: The Warlord of the Air wowed science fiction fans when it was originally published over 40 years ago. Why is the book finally making a comeback after so many years, and what qualities does the book and series contain that will continue to resonate with fans of the genre so many years after it was first released?

                        MICHAEL MOORCOCK: I think it's the steampunk phenomenon that's revived interest. The book was always one of my most popular and I had several film offers as well as influencing quite a lot of other books and movies. It gets mentioned a lot in features and books about steampunk. In some ways the story, which examines the idea of 'benign imperialism', is very relevant to the present day with the wars in the Middle East and elsewhere getting so much of our attention.
                        Read more...
                        Last edited by David Mosley; 01-16-2013, 03:23 AM.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Book Review: The Warlord Of The Air | punkettes.com

                          A 'Ten Cylinders' review by Lindsay Kitson – Dieselpunk Author
                          This review copy was provided by Titan Books, who just last month re-released this classic novel, originally published in the 70’s. Which I think is awesome, since Michael Moorcock is among those writers who stand accused of starting the whole steampunk thing.
                          http://www.thepunkettes.com/2013/02/...y-michael.html
                          Last edited by David Mosley; 02-15-2013, 12:20 AM.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Dear all,

                            If this were a new thread, it'd be called something like "The 'Steel Tsar' Revelations!".

                            Having recently acquired a copy of Titan's 'The Steel Tsar', I notice that it's flawed. It is missing maybe five pages of fictional Introduction, in which Una Persson visits Mike and gives him a copy of Oswald Bastable's latest manuscript (i.e. 'The Steel Tsar').

                            I've no idea why it's missing, and I should know; I sent them the electronic text they were to've used!

                            Meanwhile, I've been putting together the Bastable trilogy for Gollancz's new omnibus. In so doing, I've discovered that there's never been a complete and fully revised version of 'The Steel Tsar' published before...

                            As many of you will know, 'The Steel Tsar' was first published in the U.K. in 1981 (U.S.A. 1982), then substantially revised for its inclusion in the 'A Nomad Of The Time Streams' omnibus (U.K. 1993, U.S.A. 1995).

                            Those revisions used as their basis the world (i.e. U.K.) first edition. Imagine my surprise, therefore, when I discovered during research into the definitive texts to use for Gollancz, that the first American edition (DAW Books) actually included some 7 additional pages of text, missing from the British edition.

                            (Some of you may already have known this, of course, but it was news to me!)

                            Those additional pages made it into 'The Nomad Of Time' (omnibus, 1982), but not into 'A Nomad Of The Time Streams'.

                            So the Gollancz edition will be the first to contain a complete and fully revised version of 'The Steel Tsar'.

                            Best,


                            John.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by JohnDavey View Post
                              Having recently acquired a copy of Titan's 'The Steel Tsar', I notice that it's flawed. It is missing maybe five pages of fictional Introduction, in which Una Persson visits Mike and gives him a copy of Oswald Bastable's latest manuscript (i.e. 'The Steel Tsar').

                              I've no idea why it's missing, and I should know; I sent them the electronic text they were to've used!
                              Bum! And I was looking forward to replacing my homemade copy of the revised Steel Tsar with an official paperback.

                              Guess there's not much chance of the missing Introduction being put back if there's ever a second printing of the Titan edition, is there?

                              Originally posted by JohnDavey View Post
                              ...I discovered during research into the definitive texts to use for Gollancz, that the first American edition (DAW Books) actually included some 7 additional pages of text, missing from the British edition.
                              Bum! Looks like there's a Moorcock book I don't have that I'll have to track down now.

                              Still, looks like there's a Moorcock book I don't have that I'll have to track down now.

                              (Good catch though, John. Good to see that Mike can still surprise us after all these years!)

                              Originally posted by JohnDavey View Post
                              So the Gollancz edition will be the first to contain a complete and fully revised version of 'The Steel Tsar'.
                              Will the Gollancz edition, by any chance, include James Cawthorn's illustrations from the original Ace Books editions of The Warlord of the Air? (I imagine there's less than no chance of Chris Moeller's 'diary' illustrations from the White Wolf ANotTS omnibus being included.)
                              _"For an eternity Allard was alone in an icy limbo where all the colours were bright and sharp and comfortless.
                              _For another eternity Allard swam through seas without end, all green and cool and deep, where distorted creatures drifted, sometimes attacking him.
                              _And then, at last, he had reached the real world – the world he had created, where he was God and could create or destroy whatever he wished.
                              _He was supremely powerful. He told planets to destroy themselves, and they did. He created suns. Beautiful women flocked to be his. Of all men, he was the mightiest. Of all gods, he was the greatest."

                              Comment

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