Announcement

Collapse

Welcome to Moorcock's Miscellany

Dear reader,

Many people have given their valuable time to create a website for the pleasure of posing questions to Michael Moorcock, meeting people from around the world, and mining the site for information. Please follow one of the links above to learn more about the site.

Thank you,
Reinart der Fuchs
See more
See less

King of the City, starring JC

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • King of the City, starring JC

    Recently been re-reading King of the City. I am struck by how much it seems to be more or less a Jerry Cornelius story. Some of the incidents, in fact, mirror Condition of Muzak. The main character seems like a gloss on JC, and Barbican Begg is a virtual stand-in for Frank Cornelius. I was wondering if it was initially intended as a Cornelius story? Anyone know?

    Although there have been some short stories and a couple of novelettes in the past 10 years or so, this most versatile of characters, it seems to me, could stand another extended outing in these chaotic times. But then, I'm biased that way (as you can tell by my moniker).

    I have been pleased to see JC appear in Century and The Balance Lost and MM Multiverse series from DC a few years back. And I'm looking forward to the new edition of the JC stories. Two of my favorite books, aside from the quartet volumes, are Rock n Roll swindle (I much prefer the original to the later rewrite) and the Adventures of Una Persson and Catherine Cornelius, so I am looking forward to those volumes - more so since I no own a kindle.

    Well cheers and happy near-solstice!

  • #2
    Originally posted by corneliusfan View Post
    Recently been re-reading King of the City. I am struck by how much it seems to be more or less a Jerry Cornelius story. Some of the incidents, in fact, mirror Condition of Muzak. The main character seems like a gloss on JC, and Barbican Begg is a virtual stand-in for Frank Cornelius. I was wondering if it was initially intended as a Cornelius story? Anyone know?
    King is one of the few of Mike's 'literary' long works I've not read. I've got a copy, just not found the time. Your post encourages me to rectify this ASAP. Thanks.
    forum

    1. a meeting or assembly for the open discussion of subjects of public interest
    2. a medium for open discussion, such as a magazine
    3. a public meeting place for open discussion

    Comment


    • #3
      I really enjoyed, King of the City, but I didn't see it as a Cornelius novel. Obviously, the two families, the Corneliuses and the Beggs, are distantly related. But, King of the City, seems to be one of Mike's more personal, London, books. Like Mother London and some of the short stories in London Bone. I suspect that fictionalised fragments of autobiography, Mike's life and times, or reminiscences of some of his friends and acquaintances, are much nearer the surface in these books.

      To me, they have a warmer, surer, more immediate feel. I love the Cornelius series, but these books and tales are one step away from Mike's playful take on SF and one step nearer to his still playful, but sadder and wiser, take on reality.

      Comment


      • #4
        There's a note on the front page - sourced from the Wikiverse article (which calls KOTC "an unofficial Cornelius novel") - about how KOTC is "Narrated by celebrity photographer and erstwhile rock star Dennis Dover - who could also be the grown-up version of the 'real' Jerry Cornelius from The Condition of Muzak - King of the City charts a chaotic ride through London from the sixties to the end of the Twentieth century." This would appear to be based on a reply Mike gave here in 2003: "I suppose the grown up Jerry narrated King of the City in a way...".
        _"For an eternity Allard was alone in an icy limbo where all the colours were bright and sharp and comfortless.
        _For another eternity Allard swam through seas without end, all green and cool and deep, where distorted creatures drifted, sometimes attacking him.
        _And then, at last, he had reached the real world – the world he had created, where he was God and could create or destroy whatever he wished.
        _He was supremely powerful. He told planets to destroy themselves, and they did. He created suns. Beautiful women flocked to be his. Of all men, he was the mightiest. Of all gods, he was the greatest."

        Comment


        • #5
          I haven't looked at my copy of KotC for a while. However, I was going to add that, having recently reread, The Adventures of Una Persson and Catherine Cornelius in the 20th Century, I was pleasantly surprised at how parts of it seemed to look forward to Mike's later London stories. Particularly the episodes involving Catherine.

          I'll have to get out my copy of, The Condition of Muzak.

          Comment


          • #6
            Thanks for the heads up regarding the quotes. I'll echo the sentiment expressed elsewhere in these forums (fora?) that I'd like to see one more long form Cornelius story written by MM. The Cornelius characters are extremely versatile and seem pregnant with the potential to say a lot about these turbulent times.

            Comment

            Working...
            X