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Dancers At The End of Time - film / series ?

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  • Dancers At The End of Time - film / series ?

    Hi

    This trilogy is in my top 5 books of all time - it's truly wonderful.

    I often wondered after 1st reading it (early 1980s) what an amazing film it would make - although realised back then it was probably unfilmable.

    However times change, and it is eminently filmable now I think !

    Has there ever been any plans / discussions to do so ?

    PS God I'm getting old - I asked this before http://www.multiverse.org/fora/showthread.php?t=1124


    swayzak

  • #3
    Originally posted by swayzak View Post
    Hi

    This trilogy is in my top 5 books of all time - it's truly wonderful.

    I often wondered after 1st reading it (early 1980s) what an amazing film it would make - although realised back then it was probably unfilmable.

    However times change, and it is eminently filmable now I think !

    Has there ever been any plans / discussions to do so ?

    PS God I'm getting old - I asked this before http://www.multiverse.org/fora/showthread.php?t=1124


    swayzak
    I fully agree about the filmic virtues and about wishing dearly it would be made.
    But movies are no longer about good stories I fear, but about money. So if someone with influence (and a lot of influence would be necessary) thought it would make money, then you'd get it! In addition, they'd have to spent the budget of a 1980's film on the marketing efforts alone. But few are taking risks.
    Of course I'd be the first to buy a ticket at the box office in my corner of the world if the film did materialise, yet the biz being as it is ...
    Google ergo sum

    Comment


    • #4
      One day not so far off someone -- I wish it were me -- will do a broadcast version including dramatisation, music, mixed media, multi-languaged, bringing in as many strands of narrative, revision (by 'reader') and costing about as much to make as the original books did to print and distribute. Let's start anticipating that day.
      We could experiment first. It won't be any more expensive and would cost about as much as the books.
      What larks!

      Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in Europe:
      The Whispering Swarm: Book One of the Sanctuary of the White Friars - The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction
      Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles - Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - Modem Times 2.0 - The Sunday Books - The Sundered Worlds


      Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in the USA:
      The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction - The Sunday Books - Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles
      Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - The Sundered Worlds - The Winds of Limbo - Modem Times 2.0 - Elric: Swords and Roses

      Comment


      • #5
        Do you see that as being nonlinear, in the sense that the main narrative is audience - directed?

        Comment


        • #6
          Having said this, part of me thinks it would be very difficult to get right & do the book justice.

          It might be better to leave as a fictional reading experience - shot on cerebral / neuronal film every time it's read ...

          Comment


          • #7
            Originally posted by Michael Moorcock View Post
            One day not so far off someone -- I wish it were me -- will do a broadcast version including dramatisation, music, mixed media, multi-languaged, bringing in as many strands of narrative, revision (by 'reader') and costing about as much to make as the original books did to print and distribute. Let's start anticipating that day.
            We could experiment first. It won't be any more expensive and would cost about as much as the books.
            What larks!

            Mike, I could offer to speak to I.I. about a mime version if you like!
            Google ergo sum

            Comment


            • #8
              A miniseries, mebee?
              Last edited by Wanderlust; 07-27-2011, 04:42 AM.
              Any fool can make a rule, and any fool will mind it.

              ~Henry David Thoreau

              Comment


              • #9
                Having just lent the Dancers sequence to a colleague - and had their reactions to it - I think many people still find the amorality at the End of Time something they have trouble accepting. I suppose that sort of thing could be toned down but that's kind of point of the whole sequence, isn't it? That Jharek has no concept of right or wrong, of morality and immortality, which is what he desires Amelia to teach him.
                _"For an eternity Allard was alone in an icy limbo where all the colours were bright and sharp and comfortless.
                _For another eternity Allard swam through seas without end, all green and cool and deep, where distorted creatures drifted, sometimes attacking him.
                _And then, at last, he had reached the real world – the world he had created, where he was God and could create or destroy whatever he wished.
                _He was supremely powerful. He told planets to destroy themselves, and they did. He created suns. Beautiful women flocked to be his. Of all men, he was the mightiest. Of all gods, he was the greatest."

                Comment


                • #10
                  Originally posted by David Mosley View Post
                  Having just lent the Dancers sequence to a colleague - and had their reactions to it - I think many people still find the amorality at the End of Time something they have trouble accepting. I suppose that sort of thing could be toned down but that's kind of point of the whole sequence, isn't it? That Jharek has no concept of right or wrong, of morality and immortality, which is what he desires Amelia to teach him.
                  That's why Jharek is so endearing - his almost child-like, puppyish persona (moulded (mostly) by the environment he was raised).

                  His relationship & behavior with Amelia is belly-laugh funny at times (as are many parts of the book - Harold & the aliens !).

                  The apparent amorality sits completely naturally with those characters as a product of their world & and (to me) seems innocent.

                  IMO it is basically a soul-enhancing love story.

                  I lent it to my girlfriend & she thought it was wonderful.

                  But there again, it's a long time since I read it

                  Comment


                  • #11
                    Originally posted by David Mosley View Post
                    Having just lent the Dancers sequence to a colleague - and had their reactions to it - I think many people still find the amorality at the End of Time something they have trouble accepting. I suppose that sort of thing could be toned down but that's kind of point of the whole sequence, isn't it? That Jharek has no concept of right or wrong, of morality and immortality, which is what he desires Amelia to teach him.
                    Very true, the amorality is very central - but being a masterwork of MM this does not come across with a moralist undertone. Thank Goodness!
                    The absence of moral values as we known them corresponds to the absence of time (as consequences usually need a flow of time), we are at the End of Time, quite obviously. Amelia's appearance contests / challenges this situation ... well and
                    Google ergo sum

                    Comment


                    • #12
                      It was only by (re)reading Dancers later in life that I fully understood the very strong parallels with Elric and Melnibonéan culture's essential amorality in their true context. Whether it was a lack of experience or a failing of the text itself, the Melnibonéan court in Elric of Melniboné always came across as 'Evil' in my earlier readings; Dancers taught me that that way of looking at it was incorrect. Melnibonéans are not evil - contrary to what D&D would have you believe (Chaotic Evil* indeed! Pshaw!).

                      *Actually, thinking about it Melnibonéan culture seems to me very lawful, at least in terms of all the rituals and 'proper procedures' that Elric, as Emperor, was expected to observe and resisted.
                      _"For an eternity Allard was alone in an icy limbo where all the colours were bright and sharp and comfortless.
                      _For another eternity Allard swam through seas without end, all green and cool and deep, where distorted creatures drifted, sometimes attacking him.
                      _And then, at last, he had reached the real world – the world he had created, where he was God and could create or destroy whatever he wished.
                      _He was supremely powerful. He told planets to destroy themselves, and they did. He created suns. Beautiful women flocked to be his. Of all men, he was the mightiest. Of all gods, he was the greatest."

                      Comment


                      • #13
                        My daughter who has just turned 18 read it recently. She got as far as part way through 'The End of all Songs' and gave up because she thought Jherek was annoying. One comment she made was that it was not very visual and I think she's right. It's in the nature of the book that certain things are not described or explained in detail. For me that works. But it would make it hard to film, or rather any film would be even more than usual one visual interpretation.

                        Comment


                        • #14
                          I read Dancers as single volumes on hols in Cornwall, when I was 15 (I think). I remember enjoying the humour of the second book the most.

                          With a bit of trepidation, I have suggested that we read it for book club at some point. So it will be interesting to re-read and hear what others say.
                          Papa was a Rolling Stone......

                          Comment


                          • #15
                            Opa --non-linear OR linear in the way we choose 'random' for music, controllable by the audience in a number of ways, maybe based on the structure of a very good, complex game.
                            I still 'hear' it as radio serial. Wish someone would consider it. The bastards are waiting for me to die.

                            Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in Europe:
                            The Whispering Swarm: Book One of the Sanctuary of the White Friars - The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction
                            Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles - Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - Modem Times 2.0 - The Sunday Books - The Sundered Worlds


                            Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in the USA:
                            The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction - The Sunday Books - Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles
                            Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - The Sundered Worlds - The Winds of Limbo - Modem Times 2.0 - Elric: Swords and Roses

                            Comment

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