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How incredible is this?

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  • How incredible is this?

    And to think, Michael get's to see this stuff before any of us.



    What's your opinion of this cover Michael?
    The cat spread its wings and flew high into the air, hovering to keep pace with them as they moved cautiously toward the city. Then, as they climbed over the rubble of what had once been a gateway and began to make their way through piles of weed-grown masonry, the cat flew to the squat building with the yellow dome upon its roof. It flew twice around the dome and then came back to settle on Jhary's shoulder. - The King of the Swords

  • #2
    I like it a lot. The themes of each book are Earth, Water, Air and Fire and each cover reflects the element involved, while Walter has done various 'classic' forms of Stormbringer by the people most associated with Elric paintings and comics.

    Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in Europe:
    The Whispering Swarm: Book One of the Sanctuary of the White Friars - The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction
    Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles - Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - Modem Times 2.0 - The Sunday Books - The Sundered Worlds


    Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in the USA:
    The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction - The Sunday Books - Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles
    Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - The Sundered Worlds - The Winds of Limbo - Modem Times 2.0 - Elric: Swords and Roses

    Comment


    • #3
      Also note how the armour transforms from Amerindian to Melnibonean....
      I felt it was time we got away from Norse and Celtic imagery.

      Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in Europe:
      The Whispering Swarm: Book One of the Sanctuary of the White Friars - The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction
      Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles - Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - Modem Times 2.0 - The Sunday Books - The Sundered Worlds


      Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in the USA:
      The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction - The Sunday Books - Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles
      Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - The Sundered Worlds - The Winds of Limbo - Modem Times 2.0 - Elric: Swords and Roses

      Comment


      • #4
        W-O-W

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Michael Moorcock
          I felt it was time we got away from Norse and Celtic imagery.
          Oh no! Michael Moorcock is another Decadent Multiculturalist!

          Seriously, I agree with him. I love Norse and Celtic stuff (who doesnآ´t?) but Iآ´m still yearning for less Euro-centric fantasy. Thereآ´s too much of blonde hair in the genre. I would like to read heroic fantasy based on the landscapes and myths of sub-Saharan Africa, or India, or Ancient Siberia, or...anything!

          Probably such novels exist, but they are certainly in the marginal.

          Hugo Pratt, one of my favorite graphic novel artists, used myths and folklore of million different cultures in his wonderful Corto Maltese stories. Corto Maltese is a legend in Europe, but I have no idea if the stories are known in America. I hope they are. Is Mr. Moorcock familar with them, by any chance?

          Comment


          • #6
            I posted the comment above.

            Probably such novels exist, but they are certainly in the marginal.
            Oh, I almost forgot the Skrayling Tree! In only got my own copy last week...this evening I finally have time to start reading it. My expections are high!

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Olio
              Oh no! Michael Moorcock is another Decadent Multiculturalist!
              A lot of the best people are! :D

              Originally posted by Olio
              Seriously, I agree with him. I love Norse and Celtic stuff (who doesnآ´t?) but Iآ´m still yearning for less Euro-centric fantasy. Probably such novels exist, but they are certainly in the marginal.
              As a child I used to watch a cartoon called The Mysterious Cities of Gold
              , which (according to one fan-site) was a 39-episode animated serial produced in 1982. It was a French/Japanese co-production, primarily for French television (where it's known as Les Mystأ©rieuses Citأ©s d'Or), based very loosely on Scott O'Dell's book The King's Fifth. MCoG begins in the year 1532, telling the story of three children - Esteban, an orphan raised in Barcelona; Zia, a young Inca girl; and Tao, last descendent of the empire of Hiva, a continent which sank beneath the Pacific centuries earlier. The children are accompanied by the Spanish navigator Mendoza and two comic-relief sailers - Pedro and Sancho - on their search across the New World for the legendary Cities of Gold.

              Along the way they explored many a booby-trapped Aztec temple (if that's the right word) and discovered all sorts of strange, almost alien technology... including a plane shaped like a giant golden condor! I loved that cartoon, but I've no idea whether the source novel was any good or how widely available it might be.

              Now I've got the theme song in my head again. Damnation!

              D...

              http://www.whimsy.demon.co.uk/gold/info.html
              "That which does not kill us, makes us stranger." - Trevor Goodchild

              Comment


              • #8
                Oh... My... GOD!

                Cities of Gold was exceptional! I remember clearly the golden condor. When it flew over the tree's...

                I was pretty young at the time (I'm 21, so what would that have made me back then?), but I always remember that scene. Excellent stuff :D

                'Aaaaaaaah-uh-ahhh-uh-ahhhhh someday we will find the Cities Of Gold!'
                Call me cockey, but if there\'s an alien I can\'t kill, I haven\'t met him and killed him yet!

                Comment


                • #9
                  Cities of Gold! The Golden Condor! Wow, that takes me back! I was quite young when that was broadcast and I'm thirty now, so Bob must have been little more than a foetus... :)

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    8O Such cheek!

                    I expect I saw re-runs then, but either way, it was still fantastic
                    Call me cockey, but if there\'s an alien I can\'t kill, I haven\'t met him and killed him yet!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      There are, of course, fantasies done in such settings.
                      We are SO Eurocentric, of course, that the books never get translated.
                      I know there's one American or English author currently using Indian mythology, which I used in a very early short story I wrote and lost in which the planets are named Ganesh, Kali and so on and the whole
                      galaxy is basically Indian settled.
                      I also wrote a novel for the Illustrated Weekly of India (Bombay, as it
                      was still called then) which was specially commissioned to alert Indians to the need to embrace science. The story, which Jim Cawthorn and I wrote together, has a planet settled centuries before the West had space travel by Indian Hindu people who have divided into two warring groups -- one
                      totally embracing religion, the other totally embracing science.
                      I know, not a sophisticated idea, but the story was commissioned for a purpose. In the end both are reconciled to the benefit of all.
                      I like to think Jim and I played a very small part in the birth of that particular revolution.
                      And, of course, we musn't forget Bollywood's contribution to our fantasy
                      lexicon.
                      Devdas isn't a fantasy, but if you want to see a gorgeous, gorgeous
                      movie with the most beautiful woman in the world (official) as it's
                      star (Aishwarya Rai) check out the DVD. She's my ideal Cymoril, I should add.
                      The great thing about ambitious Bollywood movies is that they have many of the values one associates with a good fantasy story, plus they have tremendous song and dance routines and last for HOURS!!!
                      Total immersion.

                      Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in Europe:
                      The Whispering Swarm: Book One of the Sanctuary of the White Friars - The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction
                      Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles - Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - Modem Times 2.0 - The Sunday Books - The Sundered Worlds


                      Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in the USA:
                      The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction - The Sunday Books - Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles
                      Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - The Sundered Worlds - The Winds of Limbo - Modem Times 2.0 - Elric: Swords and Roses

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Michael Moorcock
                        Devdas isn't a fantasy, but if you want to see a gorgeous, gorgeous movie with the most beautiful woman in the world (official) as it's star (Aishwarya Rai) check out the DVD. She's my ideal Cymoril, I should add.
                        Just in case anyone is curious, her official website can be found at:

                        http://www.aishwaryaworld.com/gallery.html

                        I think the merchandise was a bad idea, but if I was the most beautiful woman in the world I'd probably want my face on baseball cap too.

                        D...
                        "That which does not kill us, makes us stranger." - Trevor Goodchild

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          In the Words of Montgomery J Burns, this cover is Egggggcellent.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Berry,
                            Thanks for posting this wonderful Simonson image, I am still smiling.
                            I love the armor design and the entire image exudes excitement.
                            Kudos to both Walt and Michael.
                            "But I'm tryin', Ringo, I'm trying real hard to be the shepard."

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              It's the PCraig Russell version of Stormbringer!
                              \"Bush\'s army of barmy bigots is the worst thing that\'s happened to the US in some years...\"
                              Michael Moorcock - 3am Magazine Interview

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