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Elric referenced in The Unwritten #14 (DC Comics/Vertigo)

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  • Elric referenced in The Unwritten #14 (DC Comics/Vertigo)

    Mike Carey's on-going series The Unwritten features a passing reference to our favourite albino prince and his black runesword in the current (fourteenth) issue:


    I should say I think it's fairly clear from the context (of the second page) that Carey's use of Stormbringer isn't a simple 'rip' of Mike's stories but instead a critique of the formulaic and clichéd mode of modern fantasy fiction that does steal from creators like Mike. However, don't take my word for it; click on the pages above and see what you think.
    Last edited by Whiskers; 10-03-2014, 02:37 AM. Reason: Fixed broken image links
    _"For an eternity Allard was alone in an icy limbo where all the colours were bright and sharp and comfortless.
    _For another eternity Allard swam through seas without end, all green and cool and deep, where distorted creatures drifted, sometimes attacking him.
    _And then, at last, he had reached the real world – the world he had created, where he was God and could create or destroy whatever he wished.
    _He was supremely powerful. He told planets to destroy themselves, and they did. He created suns. Beautiful women flocked to be his. Of all men, he was the mightiest. Of all gods, he was the greatest."

  • #2
    That's great!
    Infinite complexity according to simple rules.

    Comment


    • #3
      Stormbringer; Harry Potter (or is it The Books of Magic...?); His Dark Materials; Gaspode the Wonder Dog - is there anything not on that first page? Page two does however show why.

      Comment


      • #4
        "The Unwritten" is a great book.
        It centres around Tommy Taylor who's the Christopher Robin-like real life inspiration for the massively popular Harry Potteresque books his now missing father wrote.

        It's being implied that he is in fact the fictional character in the real world, but he hasn't figured that out yet.
        The book's all about the life of stories. Some wondering around in then real world, some locked in a painful limbo because they've been altered or misused (eg, in one issue a Jewish novel, that had it's ending changed and was used as propaganda by the Nazis.). There's also some dark organisation trying to control the collective unconsciousness by controlling these stories. In the current issue it's them trying to draw out Tommy's father by publishing a "New Tommy Taylor book" (To a massive media frenzy. A-la Harry Potter.) that's just a series of rip-offs, lifts and clichés (A-la Harry Potter! Sorry, still loyal to Mildred Hubble.)

        Anyway, it's a great read. Worthy of the Vertigo moniker. You can get the first trade (issues 1-6) now and the second, I think in November.

        Comment


        • #6
          Could I understand you are back in France ?
          Papi

          Comment


          • #8
            Don't know whether Mike's been able to check out The Unwritten yet, but Mike Carey's given an interview to MTV Geek, which discusses some of the more recent developments in The Unwritten, where he name-checks Mike as an influence and indeed a model for his own writing:

            Exclusive: Mike Carey Talks The Unwritten and His Other Favorite Books

            Geek: One interesting bit I read recently is that you based Tommy more on Christopher Milne, than Harry Potter. Has that changed over time? He certainly has his Hermione and Ron, at least.
            MC: Yeah, but that triumvirate goes back waaaaaaay further than Harry Potter. It's fair to say that the configuration of hero/hero's love/hero's sidekick is a staple in fantasy. I grew up on Moorcock's Eternal Champion, where it's absolutely ubiquitous. I'm not rejecting the Hermione/Ron parallel; I'm just saying it's an instance of something wider and older - something that Joseph Campbell would have no trouble in recognizing.
            Geek: Which book or books most made you want to become a writer?
            MC: ...When I started writing, I imitated Michael Moorcock - the Moorcock of the Eternal Champion books. I thought a hunt for magical artifacts was the only logic you could hang a fantasy novel on!
            Carey also lists Peake's Gormenghast novels as a top five 'essential book': "...because they were a milestone in my love affair with fantasy and because his world building is so intense and obsessive. And again, because of the prose: he was a painter before he was a novelist, and he uses words to paint."

            The current arc in TU is an exploration of Melville's Moby-Dick, btw.
            _"For an eternity Allard was alone in an icy limbo where all the colours were bright and sharp and comfortless.
            _For another eternity Allard swam through seas without end, all green and cool and deep, where distorted creatures drifted, sometimes attacking him.
            _And then, at last, he had reached the real world – the world he had created, where he was God and could create or destroy whatever he wished.
            _He was supremely powerful. He told planets to destroy themselves, and they did. He created suns. Beautiful women flocked to be his. Of all men, he was the mightiest. Of all gods, he was the greatest."

            Comment


            • #9
              I was reading vol 2 of The Unwritten last night. Enyoyed it too.
              There's a bewinged flying cat. Seriously. Whiskers in all but name. Done well too.
              Yes, this man knows his Moorcock!
              Last edited by Rothgo; 02-16-2011, 08:12 AM. Reason: Bewinged is too good a word not to use!

              Comment


              • #10
                The latest issue of The Unwritten (The Unwritten Apocalypse #9) appears to have not only a possible Elric reference but also a Corum ref. as well.



                I think we see (clockwise from top left): Aslan, Gollum, Elric (riding dragon), Fafnar & the Grey Mouser, Harry Potter/Tommy Taylor, Corum, Bilbo Baggins & an Eagle.

                I think.

                (Apologies for the photo quality; I'll try and upload a better scan of the page tomorrow.)



                Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
                _"For an eternity Allard was alone in an icy limbo where all the colours were bright and sharp and comfortless.
                _For another eternity Allard swam through seas without end, all green and cool and deep, where distorted creatures drifted, sometimes attacking him.
                _And then, at last, he had reached the real world – the world he had created, where he was God and could create or destroy whatever he wished.
                _He was supremely powerful. He told planets to destroy themselves, and they did. He created suns. Beautiful women flocked to be his. Of all men, he was the mightiest. Of all gods, he was the greatest."

                Comment


                • #11
                  Originally posted by David Mosley View Post
                  Mike Carey's on-going series The Unwritten features a passing reference to our favourite albino prince and his black runesword in the current (fourteenth) issue:


                  I should say I think it's fairly clear from the context (of the second page) that Carey's use of Stormbringer isn't a simple 'rip' of Mike's stories but instead a critique of the formulaic and clichéd mode of modern fantasy fiction that does steal from creators like Mike. However, don't take my word for it; click on the pages above and see what you think.
                  Linkies no workie for moi. :(


                  Still cool, though. It's like when I was reading Planetary by Warren Ellis and in one panel there's a street named Moorcock. :)


                  das

                  Comment


                  • #13
                    I've fixed the broken image links in the first post.
                    The cat spread its wings and flew high into the air, hovering to keep pace with them as they moved cautiously toward the city. Then, as they climbed over the rubble of what had once been a gateway and began to make their way through piles of weed-grown masonry, the cat flew to the squat building with the yellow dome upon its roof. It flew twice around the dome and then came back to settle on Jhary's shoulder. - The King of the Swords

                    Comment


                    • #14
                      Originally posted by David Mosley View Post
                      I should say I think it's fairly clear from the context (of the second page) that Carey's use of Stormbringer isn't a simple 'rip' of Mike's stories but instead a critique of the formulaic and clichéd mode of modern fantasy fiction that does steal from creators like Mike. However, don't take my word for it; click on the pages above and see what you think.
                      That's how I see it, too. With no original ideas left, so many writers are basically writing 'fan fic'. And some of that is actually selling! (Like 50 Shades of Drivel).


                      das

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