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Under Mayan Skies

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  • Under Mayan Skies

    Although ostensibly the title of a Stranglers Album and song I am in fact referring to your, Mr M., conception of Imrryr as Mayan-influenced. Which considering that there is a later episode in the Elric Saga where he confronts R'Lin K'Ren A'a (did I spell it right?) in a land that seems to exude the same Meso American mystique this seems a brilliant choice for Art Direction.

    Before the outage over the weekend I'd thought I'd google some interesting sites and post them here.

    Some mayan and Aztec objets d'art : www.bladeshoppe.com/ aztec.html

    Mayan Art (large files): library.thinkquest.org/ 11577/art.htm

    Mayan glyphs and architecture : http://www.halfmoon.org/

    And it's totally in keeping with the Melniboneans being cruel and demonic.

    The blurb to the Gollancz paperback edition of Elric of Melnibone deserves a mention even though this thread is really to post Mayan websites here I'll write it out because it sounds 'preview-movie-ish'.

    Elric: hero of song, story, rockshow, disc, graphic novel, PC and role-playing game: heroic fantasy's first great hero-villain, not fighting sorcery but using it to spectacular effect. Yet tormented alaways by his human failings, his longing for a perfect love, for peace and release from the sins of his terrifying past. His is a world of Dragons, spectral armies, nature in upheaval on every side...
    \'You know my destiny?\' said Elric eagerly. \'Tell me what it is, Niun Who Knew All.\'
    Niun opened his mouth as if to speak but then firmly shut it again. \'No,\' he said. \'I have forgotten.\'

  • #2
    Well next week we are on our first holiday for about 5 years to Cancun Mexico. One of the places we intend to visit is Chichen Itza which has some incredible Mayan ruins, take a look at these pages:

    http://www.mysteriousplaces.com/mayan/TourEntrance.html

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    • #3
      Delicious Darren,

      thanks for some great links. I've been a lot into Maya, Aztec, and Inca history and mythology the past few years... But serious material about it is hard to come by my end of the world.

      To tell you the truth, when I was in primary school, we never heard about the American high cultures... until I was into my twenties, I thought America before the Europeans' arrival was populated only by a sparse population of semi-articulate people living in teepees.

      Then I read something about some pyramids in mezo-America... and the heard about the Incas... and then... oh, my, a whole new world seemed to open. A culture developed totally indepently of the Europeans and Chinese! The mind wobbles. If only Cortez hadn't gone to piss on their king and subject them to his greed!
      "If the environment were a bank, we would already have saved it." -Graffitti.

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      • #4
        I was always fascinated with the Mayan culture. I was very tempted to study their culture at university, yet a more enticing faculty finally "diverted" my attention ...
        Only in the last decade or so the scientists have found out more about the destruction of the Maya. It was much less the onslaught of the Spaniards than we always asume. The Maya were already in decline and had decimated themselves. Virtually butchering themselves in a long war of city against city!
        So the comparison to the Melniboneans isn't a far cry really. They had a very high culture independently of other influences, very complex beliefs and social structures, writing, calendar and were, at the same time, given to extreme cruelty!
        A visit to mystic Palenque was for me one of the most exotic experiences in my life, especially very early in the morning, after we'd slept in hammocks a few miles away.
        Google ergo sum

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Corum
          Well next week we are on our first holiday for about 5 years to Cancun Mexico. One of the places we intend to visit is Chichen Itza which has some incredible Mayan ruins, take a look at these pages:

          http://www.mysteriousplaces.com/mayan/TourEntrance.html
          Just browsed the link you posted, it's a really colourful site with some useful info. Thanks. Hope when you visit Chitchen Itza that you'll post some photos or postcards that would be cool. (Though I'm not sure how you do that on this messageboard, sounds like a title for a new thread)

          Judicious Jagged,
          www.kstrom.net/isk/maya/mayastor.html

          www.godchecker.com/pantheon/mayan-mythology.php

          www.angelfire.com/tx2/ecc/early.html (very extensive)

          LEtranger,
          I read first the pseudo-biography by Carlos Castenadas where his Indian teacher Don Juan mentions the Olmecs as being human sacrificers, though that could be the Toltecs as I read it some years ago. Then I came across a book by, I believe, Peter Wright called Stolen Continent that went into some depth about Cortez and Quetzacoatl. Also my neighbour then regularly visited South America and is friends with the Peyote cultists in that area, as I believe it is a religion. From what I recall the Mayan seemed to me the most gentler of the meso Amerind peoples but of course, like all peoples, are subject to human emotions and capable of atrocity. Recently, about a year or so ago I learned, thro' National Geographic magazine of a sinister S America people called the Mocha who definitely are very creepy. I think there is a living descendant of the Mayan royal line still living, at least from what I gathered in Stolen Continent.

          Mr M.
          presumably if the art concept will be meso Amerind in facade it will still have towers instead of ziggurats?

          It occurs to me that Pang Tang might well then be well fitted to an Assyro-babylonian look, do you think?

          :roll:

          waffling...
          \'You know my destiny?\' said Elric eagerly. \'Tell me what it is, Niun Who Knew All.\'
          Niun opened his mouth as if to speak but then firmly shut it again. \'No,\' he said. \'I have forgotten.\'

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          • #6
            http://www.oneworldjourneys.com/jagu..._timeline.html

            :twisted:

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            • #7
              For all of you who are interested in Aztec/maya/&co litterature.
              Gary Jennings book 'Aztec' (Historical Fiction) is the best one around! At least thats what i think. He really did his homework..
              And wrote about almost all the people surrounding Mexico or "Cem-Anahuac" as the Aztecs called it.

              I think the most creepy where the Chichimeca tribes..
              The most peaceful however where the Raramuri tribe i gather.
              Being attacked sometime by the Yaki people, who where very primitive..
              And feared even by the Aztec's..

              I would really like to see Teotihuacan though..

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              • #8
                Concerning the design.... of the City of Imrryr as being Mayan-inspired.

                There's been quite a few Graphic Novel Artists and Illustrater's that have tried to visualise such a phantasmagoric place. I'm realing looking forward to how that will be imagined whether Graphically, CGIing or 'Bigature' and Blue Screen.

                Petersen and Sommers used really Phantastic Set Designer's, do you think thaey could handle Elric?

                :roll:
                \'You know my destiny?\' said Elric eagerly. \'Tell me what it is, Niun Who Knew All.\'
                Niun opened his mouth as if to speak but then firmly shut it again. \'No,\' he said. \'I have forgotten.\'

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                • #9
                  The Mayan ruin of Chichen itza was incredible. We climbed the pyramid and went inside where they ripped out the hearts of their sacrifices. They numbered about 50,000 people at their peak, 45,000 supported 5,000 leaders who used religon and fear to control their people. They were also mathematicians and astronomers. They died out around 1200AD when they had cut down all their forests and the rain stopped for 4 years where upon the masses rose up and attacked their leaders for betraying them.


                  http://www.internet-at-work.com/hos_...hen_index.html

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                  • #10
                    Check out books by John Major Jenkins also for some current Mayan discussions.

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