Announcement

Collapse

Welcome to Moorcock's Miscellany

Dear reader,

Many people have given their valuable time to create a website for the pleasure of posing questions to Michael Moorcock, meeting people from around the world, and mining the site for information. Please follow one of the links above to learn more about the site.

Thank you,
Reinart der Fuchs
See more
See less

The Multiverse! The Multiverse!

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts
  • Rothgo
    Champion of the Unbalanced
    • Aug 2006
    • 6663

    #46
    Originally posted by Tales from Tanelorn View Post
    ... but the universe is infinite...
    That's a bit of an assumption - and quite a big one (boom boom!).

    Another is the consistancy of 'universal constants', in space and/or time, particulalry given the accuracy of astronomical observations (the +/-X% error bars are suitably large given the subject matter), potential fudge factors such as dark matter assumptions, the lamda constant in general relativity etc.

    The reason we stick to current models is simply that no new ones have given us anything more than the old ones do. At least, not yet. That doesn't mean the current models are right or new ones wrong. Personally, I try to avoid the term 'right' in regard to scientific laws and understanding, rather preferring the terms 'useful' or 'good enough for what I'm doing'.

    Comment

    • Michael Moorcock
      Site Host
      • Dec 2003
      • 14278

      #47
      Even when writing about the multiverse I've been careful to call it the quasi infinite. Of course my speculations about super-dense and super-gaseous bodies fit nicely into the Dark Matter stuff as well as what I'm calling the Dark Tide, though I think a better term is needed, since 'Dark Force' and all that gets it mixed up with horror stories, Star Wars and so on. Lightless Sea ? Shades of Xanadu...
      Antimatter ? Anything which incorporates that ?

      Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in Europe:
      The Whispering Swarm: Book One of the Sanctuary of the White Friars - The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction
      Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles - Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - Modem Times 2.0 - The Sunday Books - The Sundered Worlds


      Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in the USA:
      The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction - The Sunday Books - Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles
      Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - The Sundered Worlds - The Winds of Limbo - Modem Times 2.0 - Elric: Swords and Roses

      Comment

      • Governor of Rowe Island
        Orgone Accumulator
        • Aug 2004
        • 5266

        #48
        Perhaps our ancestors weren't so far off with their talk of the 'ether'.
        You see, it's... it's no good, Montag. We've all got to be alike. The only way to be happy is for everyone to be made equal.

        -:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-

        Image Hive :-: Wikiverse :-: Media Hive

        :-: Onsite Offerings :-:


        "I am an observer of life, a non-participant who takes no sides. I am in the regimented society, but not of it." Moondog, 1964

        Comment

        • Tales from Tanelorn
          Eternal Champion
          • Dec 2003
          • 2110

          #49
          Actually I was thinking about this today before reading the posts and I wish to withdraw the word infinite. Nothing infinite can exist, it is a mathematical abstraction only.

          Regarding the observable universe it appears to be homogeneous to a couple of percent right up to the limit that we are allowed to observe and unlikely to end abruptly so in my opinion it is unlikely to be exactly the same size as we can observe. I think the observable universe was many times bigger in the early days so perhaps some of the oldest civilizations out there may know how big it is. My thoughts are that the observable universe is much less than 1% of everything.
          Last edited by Tales from Tanelorn; 03-28-2010, 02:17 PM.

          Comment

          • Tales from Tanelorn
            Eternal Champion
            • Dec 2003
            • 2110

            #50
            I was just talking to a Cosmologist about the size of the universe and regarding the size of the universe he said that :

            "If anything is infinite in size it would be the universe. Because of the finite speed of light, we can only receive information from a distance corresponding to the age of the universe of 14 billion years. We find that the universe is remarkably uniform over this scale. We can only speculate about larger scales. The two choices of infinite or edge are equally contrary to intuition."

            So now I know why I am having trouble with this.



            Also the question occurs to me whether the maximum permitted speed, the speed of light, puts any kind of limit on the maximum size of the universe? For example are any two galaxies allowed to travel apart at a relative speed of more than twice the speed of light? I believe it is allowed, but I am not sure what the explanation is because they would both have to be traveling at more than the speed of light. Can anyone explain why?


            I think these links explains this question very well, its those damn expanding voids!

            http://curious.astro.cornell.edu/que...php?number=575
            http://curious.astro.cornell.edu/que...php?number=575

            It appears that in a "quasi infinite" universe, Galaxies can be traveling away from each other at a "quasi infinite" times the speed of light! - And that doesn't feel right to me but there we are. So the universe is still developing, although the rate is reducing and one day every galaxy will occupy its own observable universe like islands in an ocean of infinite space..

            Last edited by Tales from Tanelorn; 03-29-2010, 03:51 AM.

            Comment

            • Rothgo
              Champion of the Unbalanced
              • Aug 2006
              • 6663

              #51
              The speed of light is not a maximum according to current models. The 'speed of light' limit applies to the act of accelerating something moving slower than light to moving faster (and equally, to decelerate something already moving faster to moving slower). Unless you have infinite energy to hand of course.

              This has often raised discussions about the possibility of two universes existing in the same place at different speeds - each being totally unaware of the other. But then there's the "zero mass" folks to add to the mix, who just might be able to exist in both...

              Comment

              • Tales from Tanelorn
                Eternal Champion
                • Dec 2003
                • 2110

                #52
                The other obvious possibility is that all our observations are wrong due to some cosmic smoke and mirrors type joke...

                Or perhaps we can say that matter moving at speeds greater than c relative to us is in one universe, greater than 2c another, 3c another etc etc.
                Last edited by Tales from Tanelorn; 04-04-2010, 03:01 PM.

                Comment

                Working...
                X