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Your first Moorcock Book - which, when, where?

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  • Your first Moorcock Book - which, when, where?

    Any idea which of Michael's books you read first and fascinated you so much to go further?
    For me it was "The Jewel in the Skull" , a "Mayflower Paperback", that caught my eye in a "Bahnhofbuchhandlung" - a bookstore in a railway station within sight of the Alps. That was in summer of 1973. I still remember being puzzled by its peculiar early 1970's cover design, cheap in a way, but also intriguingly "different" than the rest on the book shelf. What followed were hours of a surprising, compelling read for a 17-year old, a world being conjured with which I had had not the minutest touch so far. I shall be forever grateful.
    The paperback I still have, of course. One day I hope to get it signed.

    revised 2005
    Now I've got it signed, yippeee!
    Google ergo sum


  • #2
    My first was "Von Bek" which I read when I was 16 in the summer of 2002 after I bought a few Moorcock books figuring that he must be good because there are so many, plus I got them all in a second hand bookshop called Bookends in Gloucester for 99p each. I'd recently read David and Leigh Eddings' Belgariad and Mallorean and Robin Hobbs Assassin trilogy, so when I started on Von Bek it was, to me, a real different writing style and it got me hooked. :) [/b]

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    • #3
      Mine was Weird of the White Wolf. There was this kid named Roy in my elementary school class that had his head buried in a book at all times. Of course, this made him the subject of some ridicule at the time. It was 2nd or 3rd grade, I think, and I was fascinated by Roy's absolute focus on this book. So I asked him about it, and he, being the really nice kid that he was, let me borrow it (after excitedly telling me about it).

      I was hooked from then on. I found myself sitting in all of my classes, face buried in a book. No one bothered me about it, the teachers liked the fact that I was reading so much (I think) and my classmates never bugged me (I was a big kid - and still am! :lol: ). In fact, many of them started reading too. A few years later, my wrestling coach thought it was strange to see one of his wrestlers reading before and after practice, but I showed him a few books and he started reading SF too. Many works of SF/Fantasy are infectious like that, especially Michael Moorcock's (at least that's how it seems to me).
      When they had advanced together to meet on common
      ground, then there was the clash of shields, of spears
      and the fury of men cased in bronze; bossed shields met
      each other and the din rose loud. Then there were
      mingled the groaning and the crowing of men killed and
      killing, and the ground ran with blood.

      Homer, The Illiad

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      • #4
        I think my first Moorcock book was City Of The Beast, New English Library edition, 1971. I would have been 16 at the time and I was hooked from then on :)
        Ken Boorman
        ************
        Purveyor of the Runestaff and Stormbringer Legends
        ************

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        • #5
          I have only been reading Michael Moorcock books since late last year. A good friend of mine, told me how much he enjoyed them. He said I had to read Elric of Melnibone, as he thought I would feel the same about them.
          Just as he had said, I loved my first glimpse of the multiverse and it's characters. I am slowly working my way through the Eternal Champion series, and other Moorcock works now. :D

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          • #6
            A college friend who introduced me to my first RPG manual also used to enthuse about Stormbringer, he kept coming out with quotes and told me the story, until I just had to give this book a try. I enjoyed it immensely and from then on I sought out more of Michael's books wherever I could find them.

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            • #7
              Mine was Elric of Melnibone. I hadnt even heard of Moorcock till a few years ago when i read Neil Gaimans short story, "one life in early Moorcock".

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              • #8
                Mine was most definetly Elric of Melnibonأ©. Which i had to order through the bookshop in to get the english translation. I got hooked to say the least when all of a sudden, they where having a sale of older fantasy and science fiction books outside of the bookshop a year later. Where o could buy an almost complete set of Elric books from Grafton, and read them all that summer. Talk about fun! But i'm going to buy the collected omnibus versions of all his works later.. Right now they are really expensive! :x

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                • #9
                  2002. The Mammoth Book of Great Fantasy edited by Mike Ashley, containing Kings In Darkness. As good an introduction as any to the albino, albeit a little happier and less spectacular than other entries in the series.

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                  • #10
                    My first was The Jewel In The Skull in 1975, I think - I was at middle school and read it on the bus - second was The Stealer of Souls. I pretty much spent all my pocket money on the remaining Hawkmoon, Elric and Corum books published by Mayflower and read them voraciously.

                    I have a vivid memory of reading The Singing Citadel in the Domestic Science room, because the teacher was off sick.

                    It has taken me best part of 30 years to complete my collection.
                    Statistically 6 out of 7 dwarfs are not happy.

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                    • #11
                      My first was Elric of Melnibone. I was 11 and looking through my dad's bookshelf. He's always been a huge SF/Fantasy reader, so that's the stuff that I read when I was a kid. He was hesitant to let me read it, I guess because of the bargaining with demons and incest and what-not, but I convinced him to let me. I finished that series, then moved on to Corum and the Ice Schooner. That exhausted my dad's MM collection so I had to start working on my own. The next one I picked up was the Cornelius Chronicles (The Final Programme, The English Assassin, A Cure for Cancer, The Condition of Muzak). I couldn't finish it on the first read. A bit hard to digest at that age, I guess. At age 26, I've read it a few times now (along with the other 40-odd MM books in my collection) and it's definitely my favorite.

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                      • #12
                        I read both Elric of Melnibone (the original book) and The Eternal Champion both kinda concurrently with each other. I read the first fifty pages of EoM, then a copy of The Eternal Champion came to the local library and I borrowed it and devoured it.

                        And that was....late 2002.

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                        • #13
                          My brother bought me Elric of Melnibone for Christmas '93. I was never much of a reader, but when I read that book I was hooked on Moorcock.

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                          • #14
                            The Vanishing Tower, around 10 years old. I had just finished some of the Narnia books (which bored the heck out of me) and asked my older brother if he had any books for me to read. After completing the book I began a Moorcock buying spree that has been going on strong since '86.

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                            • #15
                              I've been an avid reader of Mr. Moorcock since about 1984. It all started with the beautifully done Berkley Books paperback covers for the entire Elric series, done by Robert Gould. Caught my eye and got me through the door. I read all six books as fast as I could, and afterwards I yearned for more. Corum came to my rescue. Now, so many years later, I have quite the collection of Mr. Moorcock's books and I still yearn for more...

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