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how 30 years loses things

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  • how 30 years loses things

    Greetings friends!

    I have but two of Michael's books left on my diminuitive bookshelf - a paperback of The Fortress of the Pearl and a hardbound copy of The Dreamthief's Daughter.

    Once, 30 years ago, I had a proud collection of MM paperbacks which I had collected from my travels all over - primarily at "odd" bookstores I would frequent between 1972 and 1976 in Chicago's Lincoln Park area.

    I had dragged these around in boxes from home to home until one day some years ago, I had discovered that my wife had *donated* the entire lot to some library fundraiser in SE Wisconsin, where we now live.

    These had been my prize possessions for years. I had a number of titles that had been published in the UK and had not yet even been published in the US.

    Somewhat as a consolation, my wife bought me the two aforementioned books - first the paperback and then the hardcover. Did she think that once seeing me heart-broken by her dismissal of my valuable collection, she would takes steps to restore it? Too little, too late. I can't say that it's the thought that counts, either.

    For many years, before we were first married, I would say that I wanted to travel over to London and try to look up MM for a face to face chat.
    I think she might have been a little jealous of my devotion at the time.

    In any case, if anyone should recover my collection, I would appreciate it if you would kindly return it to me.

    Last thought: On Page 10 of TDTD, in the 5th paragraph, MM makes some solid comments about politics and I am reminded of how true those words ring four years later.

    Thanks, Michael. And what the heck are you doing in Texas? Thinking about Robert E. Howard, I would what is it about Texas anyway...

  • #2
    Oh dear!

    I don't even want to imagine the argument when you discovered they were gone. Absolute wounder :(
    Call me cockey, but if there\'s an alien I can\'t kill, I haven\'t met him and killed him yet!

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    • #3
      Isn't that grounds for divorce? :D

      I was a little worried about the last move we made. My wife might have been able to "accidentally" lose a few boxes of books (but she didn't). She knows better than to mess with my collection of MM's books, only because she knows I would go to great lengths (and expense) to replace them. :)

      And Hugo, for what it's worth-- although it will never be London, at least Mike picked the best part of Texas to live.

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      • #4
        Oh, it *IS* grounds for divorce.

        I have a massive library as compared to the average person nowadays. One could easily suggest that getting rid of a few boxes worth would be no big deal. Then again, if I am not the one to choose the precise books to go into the charity donation, some of those books could be signed editions by William Burroughs, first editions by J.G. Ballard, collectable illustrated editions by Harry Clarke, John Austen, and Austin Spare, etc.

        If that ever happened to me, it would be a black day indeed. Not easy to come by some of that stuff. Even if it is easy, it might not be too cheap. Most of my signed editions were signed in front of me too, as I'm not much one for buying a pre-signed book. I don't buy them for the value of the signature either - I won't sell a signed book. So basically, if someone were to give away such a book they would be giving away a momento of my meeting an author I liked and respected.

        No one fucks with my "stuff."

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        • #5
          Originally posted by krunky
          I have a massive library as compared to the average person nowadays. One could easily suggest that getting rid of a few boxes worth would be no big deal. Then again, if I am not the one to choose the precise books to go into the charity donation, some of those books could be signed editions by William Burroughs, first editions by J.G. Ballard, collectable illustrated editions by Harry Clarke, John Austen, and Austin Spare, etc.
          Exactly. We could probably all stand to loose a few boxes of "stuff" here and there, but you should at least get to say which books stay and which go. If someone snuck some out behind my back I'd be genuinely peeved, not because of the things themselves (although if I had a signed Burroughs, I'd guard it with my life), but because of the... well, betrayal might be too strong a word, but it's certainly a "diss". Oh dear, now I've got the image of an up-market, literary Jerry Springer show in my head:

          Man: "She gave my first editions away to my best friend!!"
          Audience: "Redirect her to the curb, professor!!!"
          Woman: "You don't know! You don't know! He needed them for his doctorate!"
          Audience: Booooo!
          Audience: "Proceed Jerry, proceed!"

          No? Sorry.

          D...
          "That which does not kill us, makes us stranger." - Trevor Goodchild

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          • #6
            It sounds like revenge for something you did?

            If not, time to start filing...

            :)

            Why should she be jealous?


            I picked up a nice hard cover Dracula in one of them Chicago used book stores.
            It cost me like a few sea shells. What a bargain!
            _______________--
            Yeah, those are common words on Springer-type
            shows isn't it.

            "You don't know me! You don't know me!"

            "You want some, beeatch?!?"
            \"Bush\'s army of barmy bigots is the worst thing that\'s happened to the US in some years...\"
            Michael Moorcock - 3am Magazine Interview

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            • #7
              Originally posted by DeeCrowSeer
              (although if I had a signed Burroughs, I'd guard it with my life)

              Heh heh, I've got one, back from when he did a talk at the Academy back in the eighties.
              Sorry to be smug, but... bugger it, I just am....
              "Ph'nglui mglw'nafh Cthulhu R'lyeh wgah'nagl f'tagn"

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              • #8
                Originally posted by krunky
                Most of my signed editions were signed in front of me too, as I'm not much one for buying a pre-signed book. I don't buy them for the value of the signature either - I won't sell a signed book. So basically, if someone were to give away such a book they would be giving away a momento of my meeting an author I liked and respected.
                I'm with you on that one, Krunky. I have a few books that I bought already signed (some were only available as signed limited edtitions), but there's something about having a book pass back through the author's hands that creates something much more real. Maybe I like the feeling of the intersection of an author, a book, and me. When I've given signed books to a few friends, I feel like I'm sharing that feeling with them.

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