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Chronicles of the Black Sword ◦ Mike's Books Been reading one of Mike's novels, stories or articles and want to discuss it with other readers? Or not sure what to read next? Then ask here, someone is bound to recommend something. Post reviews and comments of Mike's work here as well.

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Old 06-26-2006, 04:10 PM
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I want to submit this as a possible format for the 'Books by Mike' section of the FAQ. I've labelled it as Section 1, but that's primarily so you can see how the tabulation works. If it ends up as Section 2 or 3 (or whatever) then we'll amend the numbering accordingly.

The next post after this will attempt to justify the number that I arrive at in my answer to Question 1.1.

Please post any comments or suggestions afterwards.

[Mention must be made at this point to the debt I owe John Davey's "A Reader's Guide" in compiling my answers.]




Section 1 – Books

1.1 How many books has Michael Moorcock written?
The calculation of how many books Mike has written is not a precise science. Bibliographers have been driven to despair by the sheer volume of retitled, repackaged, revised, censored or otherwise altered titles that it’s almost impossible to arrive at a definitive total. Not to mention that Mike is a working author so the number is likely to rise in any case.

However, if we discount for the moment pamphlets, comics, omnibuses, anthologies, revised, edited, censored or repackaged titles, etc. as well as non-English editions but include collections and novellas published in hard- or paperback format then the answer is 98 - or thereabouts.
1.1.1 So how many pamphlets/chapbooks has Mike had published?
5 – These being Caribbean Crisis, Epic Pooh, The Real Life Mr Newman, The Retreat From Liberty, and The Birds of the Moon. Apart from Caribbean Crisis and The Retreat of Libertyall have been reprinted in other formats. Caribbean Crisis is available online at the Sweet Despise website.
1.1.2 How many comics has Michael Moorcock written?
Mike wrote many comic strips in the 1950s/60s that have not been collected from their original publication, so we don’t include those here. Graphic works that Mike has written which may be regarded as books in their own right are:
Elric: The Return to Melniboné (with Philippe Druillet)
The Swords of Heaven, the Flowers of Hell (with Howard Chaykin)
Michael Moorcock’s Multiverse (with Walter Simonson, Mark Reeve & John Ridgeway)
Elric: The Making of a Sorcerer (with Walter Simonson)
We might also include the following comic strips:
“The Adventures of Jerry Cornelius” (with M. John Harrison, Mal Dean & Richard Glyn Jones) [reprinted in The New Nature of the Catastrophe
“A Sword Called Stormbringer” (with Roy Thomas & Barry Smith) [in Conan the Barbarian #14, reprinted in Essential Conan, Vol 3]
“The Green Empress of Melniboné” (with Roy Thomas & Barry Smith) [in Conan the Barbarian #15, reprinted in Essential Conan, Vol 3]
“Blitz Kid” (with Walter Simonson) [in 9-11 September 11th 2001, Vol 2]
“The Black Blade of the Barbary Coast” (with Jerry Ordway) [in Tom Strong #31-32, reprinted inTom Strong, Vol 5]
1.1.3 How many omnibuses has Michael Moorcock published?
Calculating this is almost as complex as working out how many books Mike has written. Counting only UK and US omnibuses, and allowing for the fact that the same omnibus might appear under different titles – or with slightly varying contents - it is possible to identify 23 separate omnibuses.
1.1.3.1 What are the titles?
Please see the Bibliography for further details.
1.1.4 How many anthologies had Michael Moorcock edited?
15 disparate titles have been identified as edited (or part edited) by Mike - not including The Nature of the Catastrophe/The New Nature of the Catastrophe, which we count as books in Section 1.1.
1.1.4.1 What are the titles?
Please see the Bibliography for further details
1.2 Where can I find a complete list of books written or edited by Michael Moorcock?
Please see the Bibliography for details.
1.2.1 Where can I find a complete list of short stories written by Michael Moorcock?
Again, please see the Bibliography for details of Mike’s short stories.
1.3 How many of Michael Moorcock’s books have had more than one title?
A number of Mike’s books have appeared with more than one title. Often this is just a case of US and UK publishers preferring different titles for their specific market, but occasionally it happens because a book has been substantially rewritten since its original publication.
The Sundered Worlds = The Blood Red Game
The Fireclown = The Winds of Limbo
Warriors of Mars = City of the Beast
Blades of Mars = Lord of the Spiders
Barbarians of Mars = Masters of the Pit
The Twilight Man = The Shores of Death
The Wrecks of Time = The Rituals of Infinity
Sorcerer’s Amulet = The Mad God’s Amulet
The Secret of the Runestaff = The Runestaff
The Dreaming City = Elric of Melniboné (unauthorised US edition)
The Silver Warriors = Phoenix in Obsidian
The Sleeping Sorceress = The Vanishing Tower
Dying for Tomorrow = Moorcock’s Book of Martyrs
A Messiah at the End of Time = The Transformation of Miss Mavis Ming
Two titles were heavily revised from their original publication to the extent they are effectively different novels:
Printer’s Devil = The Chinese Agent
Somewhere in the Night = The Russian Intelligence
1.4 Which books by Michael Moorcock have been edited or censored?
Books may be edited for a number of reasons, either to do with re-working an existing serialisation, or for the publisher’s own reasons. The following list includes books that exist in various editions with textual differences:
Stormbringer – 1st publication edited down from original Science Fantasy novellas
The War Lord of the Air – Authorised edits made by UK publisher
The Dreaming City – Unauthorised edits made by publisher. (Unauthorised US edition)
Byzantium Endures – Unauthorised edits made by US publisher.
1.5 Which books by Michael Moorcock have been revised since first publication?
As Mike’s books have been republished or collected in omnibus editions, revisions have occasionally been made to them. Sometimes these are minor – to bring them into closer alignment with other books – at other times the revisions have been substantial. Here is a list of books that have been substantially revised over time:
Stormbringer – Original text from original Science Fantasy novellas restored for 1978 edition.
Printer’s Devil – Heavily revised as a Jerry Cornell novel (The Chinese Agent)
Somewhere in the Night – Heavily revised as a Jerry Cornell novel (The Russian Intelligence)
The Shores of Death – Original New Worlds serialisation heavily rewritten for paperback edition (The Twilight Man / The Shores of Death)
The Steel Tsar – Original novel heavily rewritten for inclusion in A Nomad of the Time-Streams omnibus
Gloriana – Chapter 34 was rewritten to remove rape scene for 1993 edition
1.6 What about The Time of the Hawklords and Queens of Deliria? Did Michael Moorcock write these books?
The Time of the Hawklords is credited to ‘Michael Moorcock & Michael Butterworth’ but Mike’s actual contribution is negligible, while Queens of Deliria is Butterworth’s own sequel, which Mike had no involvement in. Mike has been critical of the publisher’s decision to give undue prominence to his name over Butterworth’s, considering it to be - at best - misleading to his readers. As such, we don’t count either as “Books by Mike”.
___________________________________________________________________________
_"For an eternity Allard was alone in an icy limbo where all the colours were bright and sharp and comfortless.
_For another eternity Allard swam through seas without end, all green and cool and deep, where distorted creatures drifted, sometimes attacking him.
_And then, at last, he had reached the real world – the world he had created, where he was God and could create or destroy whatever he wished.
_He was supremely powerful. He told planets to destroy themselves, and they did. He created suns. Beautiful women flocked to be his. Of all men, he was the mightiest. Of all gods, he was the greatest."

Last edited by David Mosley; 07-04-2006 at 03:26 AM. Reason: Tabulation didn't take first time. :(
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Old 06-26-2006, 04:22 PM
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Okay, here's how I arrived at the figure of 98 for the number of books written by Mike for my answer in Section 1.1 above. (For the record, that figure floated between 95 and 101 before I finalised my selection criteria). [Note: List updated to take into account post-2006 publication.]

-- The Hungry Dreamers (lost manuscript - never published)
-- Caribbean Crisis (as Desmond Reid) (by MM & James Cawthorn - re-written by publisher)
1 The Stealer Of Souls (collection of five stories from Science Fantasy (1961-2) - repackaged as The Weird of the White Wolf / The Bane of the Black Sword (1977))
2 The Sundered Worlds (retitled The Blood Red Game (1970))
3 Stormbringer (edited versions of four novellas from Science Fantasy (1962-3) - contents restored and revised in 1978)
4 The Fireclown (retitled The Winds Of Limbo (1969))
5 Warriors Of Mars (retitled City Of The Beast (1970))
6 Blades Of Mars (retitled Lord Of The Spiders (1971))
7 Barbarians Of Mars (retitled Masters Of The Pit (1971))
8 The Twilight Man (retitled The Shores Of Death (1970), revised in The Roads Between the Worlds omnibus (1998))
9 The LSD Dossier (as Roger Harris)
10 Somewhere In The Night (revised as The Chinese Agent (1970))
11 Printer's Devil (revised as The Russian Intelligence (1980))
12 The Deep Fix (as James Colvin) (collection, repackaged in The Time Dweller / My Experiences in the Third World War)
13 The Jewel In The Skull
14 The Wrecks Of Time (censored US edition) (retitled The Rituals Of Infinity (1971))
15 The Mad God's Amulet (aka Sorcerer's Amulet (US))
16 The Sword Of The Dawn
17 The Final Programme (censored in US)
18 The Runestaff (aka The Secret of the Runestaff (US))
19 Behold The Man
20 The Chinese Agent (revised from Somewhere In The Night)
-- The Winds Of Limbo (formerly The Fireclown)
21 The Black Corridor (with Hilary Bailey (uncredited))
22 The Ice Schooner (revised in 1977 and 1986)
23 The Time Dweller (collection)
-- The Blood Red Game (formerly The Sundered Worlds)
24 The Singing Citadel (collection - repackaged as The Weird of the White Wolf / The Bane of the Black Sword (1977))
25 The Eternal Champion
26 Phoenix In Obsidian (aka The Silver Warriors (US))
-- The Shores Of Death (formerly The Twilight Man)
-- City Of The Beast (formerly Warriors Of Mars)
27 The Nature Of The Catastrophe (anthology, stories by Moorcock & others)
28 A Cure For Cancer
-- The Rituals Of Infinity (uncensored) (revised from The Wrecks Of Time (1967))
29 The Knight Of The Swords
30 The Queen Of The Swords
31 The King Of The Swords
32 The Warlord Of The Air (censored in UK - cuts restored in A Nomad of the Time Steams omnibus (1993))
33 The Sleeping Sorceress (retitled The Vanishing Tower (1977))
-- Lord Of The Spiders (formerly Blades Of Mars)
-- Masters Of The Pit (formerly Barbarians Of Mars)
34 The English Assassin
35 An Alien Heat
36 Elric Of Melniboné (published as The Dreaming City with unauthorised cuts (US))
37 Breakfast In The Ruins
38 The Bull And The Spear
39 The Oak And The Ram
40 The Jade Man's Eyes (novella, revised in The Sailor on the Seas of Fate)
41 Count Brass
42 The Champion of Garathorm
43 The Sword and The Stallion
44 The Hollow Lands
45 The Land Leviathan
46 The Quest For Tanelorn
47 The Distant Suns (with Phillip James)
48 The Lives And Times Of Jerry Cornelius (collection, censored in US)
49 Moorcock's Book Of Martyrs (collection, aka Dying For Tomorrow (US))
50 The Adventures of Una Persson and Catherine Cornelius in the Twentieth Century (censored in US)
51 The End Of All Songs
52 Legends From The End Of Time (collection)
53 The Sailor On The Seas Of Fate (collects three novellas - Voyage on a Dark Ship, The Lands Beyond the World & The Jade Man's Eyes - retitled)
54 Sojan (collection, featuring 'juvenile' stories from Tarzan Adventures magazine (1956-8) & others)
55 The Condition Of Muzak
56 The Transformation Of Miss Mavis Ming (aka A Messiah At The End Of Time (US), revised as Constant Fire)
-- The Weird Of The White Wolf (collection, formerly The Singing Citadel / The Stealer of Souls)
-- The Vanishing Tower (formerly The Sleeping Sorceress)
-- The Bane Of The Black Sword (collection, formerly The Stealer of Souls/The Singing Citadel)
57 Stormbringer (restored & revised)
58 Gloriana (revised in 1993)
-- Epic Pooh (pamphlet, non-fiction, reprinted in Wizardry and Wild Romance (1987))
-- The Real Life Mr. Newman (pamphlet, originally published in The Deep Fix (1966))
59 The Golden Barge (originally written in 1958)
60 The Russian Intelligence (revised from Printer's Devil)
61 My Experiences In The Third World War (collection)
62 Byzantium Endures (censored in US)
63 The Great Rock 'n' Roll Swindle
64 The Entropy Tango
65 The Steel Tsar (substantially revised in A Nomad of the Time-Streams omnibus (1993))
66 The War Hound And The Worlds Pain
67 The Brothel In Rosenstrasse
-- The Retreat From Liberty (non-fiction)
68 The Laughter Of Carthage
69 Elric At The End Of Time (collection)
70 The Opium General and Other Stories
-- The Lives And Times Of Jerry Cornelius (collection, revised with new introduction & Epilogue)
71 The Dragon In The Sword
72 The City In The Autumn Stars (original manuscript cut at publisher's request)
73 Elric At The End Of Time (illustrated novella, with Rodney Matthews)
74 Letters From Hollywood (non-fiction)
75 Wizardry And Wild Romance (non-fiction)
76 Mother London
77 Casablanca
78 The Fortress Of The Pearl
79 The Revenge Of The Rose
80 Death Is No Obstacle (with Colin Greenland) (non-fiction)
81 Jerusalem Commands
82 Gloriana (revised edition)
83 The New Nature Of The Catastrophe (anthology, revised from 1971) (Moorcock & others)
84 Blood
-- The Birds Of The Moon (pamphlet, reprinted in Fabulous Harbours (1995))
85 Fabulous Harbours (collection)
86 Lunching With The Antichrist (collection)
87 The War Amongst The Angels
88 Tales From The Texas Woods (collection)
89 King Of The City
90 Silverheart (with Storm Constantine)
91 London Bone (collection)
92 The Dreamthief's Daughter
93 Firing The Cathedral (novella, reprinted in The Lives and Times of Jerry Cornelius (2003))
94 The Skrayling Tree
95 The Lives and Times of Jerry Cornelius (revised US collection, reprints 'Firing the Cathedral')
96 The Mystery of the Texas Twister (novella, published with Argosy #1)
97 The White Wolf's Son
98 The Vengeance Of Rome
99 The Metatemporal Detective (collection)
100 Elric: The Stealer of Souls (collection)
101 Elric: To Rescue Tanelorn (collection)
102 Elric: The Sleeping Sorceress (collection) *Due November 2009*
103 Elric: Duke Elric (collection) *Due March 2009*
104 Into The Media Web (collection) *Due 2009*

As you see, I haven't included the pamphlets, retitled works, omnibuses. anthologies etc. as mentioned in the FAQ above, although I have included revised editions where the revisions are substantial. I've omitted Caribbean Crisis as a 'novel', but have added The Mystery of the Texas Twister as a paperback novella. The 2003 edition of The Lives and Times of Jerry Cornelius is cited as a separate book because its contents are considerably different from either the original 1976 edition or the revised '80s edition.
___________________________________________________________________________
_"For an eternity Allard was alone in an icy limbo where all the colours were bright and sharp and comfortless.
_For another eternity Allard swam through seas without end, all green and cool and deep, where distorted creatures drifted, sometimes attacking him.
_And then, at last, he had reached the real world – the world he had created, where he was God and could create or destroy whatever he wished.
_He was supremely powerful. He told planets to destroy themselves, and they did. He created suns. Beautiful women flocked to be his. Of all men, he was the mightiest. Of all gods, he was the greatest."

Last edited by David Mosley; 10-01-2008 at 01:10 AM.
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Old 06-26-2006, 04:31 PM
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David, that's superb! very nice, and very helpful. :) an informative list.


-more comments to follow.


thanks,


-Lemec
___________________________________________________________________________

"With a deep, not-unhappy sigh, Elric prepared to do battle with an army." (Red Pearls)
- Michael Moorcock
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Old 06-26-2006, 04:42 PM
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Now, the explanation of how I arrived at 23 separate omnibuses:

In no particular order:

1 The Cornelius Quartet (aka The Cornlius Chronicles*)
2 The Swords of Corum (aka The Swords Trilogy aka The Prince in the Scarlet Tunic aka Corum aka Corum: The Coming of Chaos)
3 A Cornelius Calender
4 The Elric Saga Part 1
5 The Elric Saga Part 2
6 The Elric Saga Part 3
7 The Elric Saga Part 4
8 The Dancers at the End of Time
9 Elric (Fantasy Masterworks)
10 The History of the Runestaff (aka Hawkmoon)
11 The Chronicles of Corum (aka The Prince with the Silver Hand)
12 The Chronicles of Castle Brass (aka Count Brass)
13 The Nomad of Time (aka A Nomad of the Time Streams)
14 Warrior of Mars (aka Kane of Old Mars)
15 Von Bek
16 Sailing to Utopia
17 The Eternal Champion
18 Earl Aubec (aka Earl Aubec and other stories)
19 Elric of Melniboné (aka Elric: Song of the Black Sword)
20 Stormbringer (aka Elric: The Stealer of Souls)
21 Legends from the End of Time (aka Tales from the End of Time)
22 Behold the Man and others
23 The Road Between the Worlds

*Actually the Ace (?) The Cornelius Chronicles stretches to 3 vols, so perhaps that should be 25 separate omnibuses?
___________________________________________________________________________
_"For an eternity Allard was alone in an icy limbo where all the colours were bright and sharp and comfortless.
_For another eternity Allard swam through seas without end, all green and cool and deep, where distorted creatures drifted, sometimes attacking him.
_And then, at last, he had reached the real world – the world he had created, where he was God and could create or destroy whatever he wished.
_He was supremely powerful. He told planets to destroy themselves, and they did. He created suns. Beautiful women flocked to be his. Of all men, he was the mightiest. Of all gods, he was the greatest."

Last edited by David Mosley; 06-26-2006 at 04:56 PM.
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Old 06-26-2006, 04:54 PM
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...and how I arrived at 15 separate anthologies edited by Mike:

1 Best of New Worlds (1965)
2 Best SF Stories from New Worlds (1967)
3 Best SF Stories from New Worlds II (1968)
4 Best SF Stories from New Worlds 3 (1968)
5 The Traps of Time (1968)
6 Best SF Stories from New Worlds 4 (1969)
7 Best SF Stories from New Worlds 5 (1969)
8 The Inner Landscape (1969) (Uncredited anthology with three stories by Peake, Ballard & Aldiss)
9 Best SF Stories from New Worlds 6 (1970)
10 Best SF Stories from New Worlds 7 (1971)
11 Best SF Stories from New Worlds 8 (1974)
12 Before Armageddon (1975)
13 England Invaded (1977)
14 New Worlds: An Anthology (1st edition 1983, 2nd revised edition 2004)
15 Fantasy: The 100 Best Books (with James Cawthorn) (1988)

I haven't included the Moorcock's Miscellany anthology as it hasn't been published yet.

ETA: Nor do I include the varous issues of New Worlds edited by Mike, which should be in a separate Section (Other Media?):)
___________________________________________________________________________
_"For an eternity Allard was alone in an icy limbo where all the colours were bright and sharp and comfortless.
_For another eternity Allard swam through seas without end, all green and cool and deep, where distorted creatures drifted, sometimes attacking him.
_And then, at last, he had reached the real world – the world he had created, where he was God and could create or destroy whatever he wished.
_He was supremely powerful. He told planets to destroy themselves, and they did. He created suns. Beautiful women flocked to be his. Of all men, he was the mightiest. Of all gods, he was the greatest."

Last edited by David Mosley; 07-04-2006 at 04:36 AM.
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Old 06-29-2006, 03:32 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by David Mosley
1.4 Which books by Michael Moorcock have been edited or censored?

Books may be edited for a number of reasons, either to do with re-working an existing serialisation, or for the publisher’s own reasons. The following list includes books that exist in various editions with textual differences:
Stormbringer – 1st hardback edition edited down from original Science Fantasy novellas
The Final Programme - censored in US edition
The War Lord of the Air – Authorised edits made by UK publisher
The Dreaming City – Unauthorised edits made by US publisher (Unauthorised edition)
The Adventures of Una Persson and Catherine Cornelius in the Twentieth Century - censored by US publisher
The Lives and Times of Jerry Cornelius
- censored by US publisher
Byzantium Endures – Unauthorised edits made by US publisher
The City in the Autumn Stars - Cuts made upon request of the publisher
Updates to Section 1.4
1.4.2 Why was 'The War Lord of the Air' censored in the UK?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Moorcock
The legal department at the publisher didn't want the stuff about Reagan, Jagger and so on in, so asked for it to be changed. Knowing the US edition was there and that I could soon bring out the regular edition inthe UK I didn't worry too much.
1.4.4 Who censored 'The Adventures of Una Persson...'?
The version of 'The Adventures of Una Persson and Catherine' published with 'The Black Corridor' was censored mainly for sexual content by the publisher because it was intended for the K-Mart/Wal-Mart market.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Moorcock
The publisher censored the books without K-Mart asking them to because they feared K-Mart wouldn't take them otherwise. The whole thing was a strange abortive venture (Black Corridor/Una Persson, Catherine Cornelius).
1.4.5 Why was 'The Lives and Times of Jerry Cornelius' censored in the US?
In a letter to Science Fiction Review in 1978, Mike explained that:
Quote:
Dale recently wrote to me with a raft of suggested changes... I wrote back and suggested many more changes - as many as they needed to make sure of the K-Mart market - and they appear to have missed any irony and are gratefully going ahead...
This seems to be the source for the 'Special American edition approved by the author' credit that appears on the 1976 Dale edition, although Mike has since called it "abominable".
1.4.6 Why was 'Byzantium Endures' censored by Random House in the US?
Random House decided to excise much of Pyat's antisemitism and other distasteful references without Mike's authorisation for fear they would give offence. Mike, however, says:

Quote:
I have not had a single Jewish person take offence at those books, because it's clear to anyone that the central character's views aren't mine, but Random decided otherwise... I suspect the book had gone to a lawyer or two...
1.4.7 Why was 'The City in the Autumn Stars' cut?
When Mike handed in the finished manuscript for City, the editor, David Hartwell, pointed out that he wanted the fantasy novel book Mike had sold him rather the philosophical discourse he'd delivered. To that end, Mike cut up to 50% (?? verification needed) of the original text for the eventual publication.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Moorcock
City in the Autumn Stars wasn't actually rejected by the publisher but I realised it had become more of a philosophical ramble than the editor wanted. It was supposed to be a fantasy novel, not a treatise on alchemy and so forth, so I trimmed it accordingly. I could easily, I'm sure, have taken it to a different publisher and had it published as I wished. There's talk...of redoing it in the full version. I felt, however, that it would be selling the reader something other than what they thought they were buying, and I don't like to do that.
The original manuscript now resides partly with Mike and partly with a friend. It is hoped eventually to reunite the two parts.
Updates to Section 1.5
Quote:
Which books by Michael Moorcock have been revised since first publication?
1.5.4 What changes were made to 'The Steel Tsar'?
Mike revised the ending of The Steel Tsar for the 1993 omnibus 'A Nomad of the Time Streams' because he was unhappy with the original ending.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Moorcock
The original US publisher of The Steel Tsar, for instance, didn't think the book was up to the first two, but I wasn't at the time in a position to look at it again, though I agreed with him it wasn't up to the two previous ones -- so I suggested he pay a bit less for it. He agreed and we had a deal. The first chance I got later, I revised it, I hope for the better.
1.5.6 Why did Mike re-write/revise the ending of 'Gloriana'?
In the original 1978 version of Gloriana, Captain Quire raped Gloriana in Chapter 34, the penultimate chapter. Afterwards, Mike became concerned that the episode might be seen as a justification of rape, so in 1993 for the re-issuing of Gloriana he revised it. The current edition (from Warner Aspect (2003)) includes both versions.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Moorcock
This is a sore point with me and I fell out with John Clute for what I regarded as a serious lie in The Encyclopaedia of Fantasy, where he suggests that extensive rewriting ruins the book and that my support for the feminist movement made me do it. There is only one change in the penultimate chapter, where Quire seeks to rape Gloriana and I reverse it slightly because I became worried that the scene justified rape (and I've already had reports of people calling themselves Elric or Jerry Cornelius raping people, so it's of considerable concern to me). That's the only change. Some people do think it's an improvement while others think it changes the feel of the book, even weakens it. They could be right, in which case I'll take another look at the problem sometime and see if I can come up with another solution. First place the changes appeared was in the Italian edition (otherwise not hugely recommended because of cuts) and also in the Polish edition (which was No. 3 bestseller after Grisham and Lecter!), first English version was the Phoenix House edition of, I think, 1993. That's the one which is currently in print and in the Fantasy Masterworks series, with the Moreau cover restored! I'd be curious to see what someone else thinks of it. There was a fairly unpleasant review on Amazon which was replied to by an evident friend! However, it worries me if readers feel there's something wrong with a resolution, so I'm always grateful to hear what people think.
___________________________________________________________________________
_"For an eternity Allard was alone in an icy limbo where all the colours were bright and sharp and comfortless.
_For another eternity Allard swam through seas without end, all green and cool and deep, where distorted creatures drifted, sometimes attacking him.
_And then, at last, he had reached the real world – the world he had created, where he was God and could create or destroy whatever he wished.
_He was supremely powerful. He told planets to destroy themselves, and they did. He created suns. Beautiful women flocked to be his. Of all men, he was the mightiest. Of all gods, he was the greatest."

Last edited by David Mosley; 06-29-2006 at 04:22 AM.
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Old 06-29-2006, 01:41 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by David Mosley
However, if we discount for the moment pamphlets, comics, omnibuses, anthologies, revised, edited, censored or repackaged titles, etc. as well as non-English editions
I really am not saying this just to be awkward, but a question arose in my mind as soon as I read the above line.

'The Jade Man's Eyes' (Unicorn Fantasy, 1973) is described as a chapbook. How does this figure in your list? Or could it be described as a pamphlet? I have never seen any of the examples listed as pamphlets, so I'm not able to compare.



Fantastic work, by the way.
Very good to have the information laid out so clearly (and in one place.)

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You see, it's... it's no good, Montag. We've all got to be alike. The only way to be happy is for everyone to be made equal.

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Old 06-29-2006, 04:23 PM
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David Mosley David Mosley is offline
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I regard JME as a very slim paperback. It's squarebound and saddle-stitched rather than stapled, which is my definition of a pamphlet, chapbook, etc. Epic Pooh, Real Life Mr Newman, Retreat of Liberty and Birds of the Moon are all stapled afaik. (I only have BotM, but judging by photos I've seen of the other three I think my assessment of them is right.)

Thanks for the kind words.
___________________________________________________________________________
_"For an eternity Allard was alone in an icy limbo where all the colours were bright and sharp and comfortless.
_For another eternity Allard swam through seas without end, all green and cool and deep, where distorted creatures drifted, sometimes attacking him.
_And then, at last, he had reached the real world – the world he had created, where he was God and could create or destroy whatever he wished.
_He was supremely powerful. He told planets to destroy themselves, and they did. He created suns. Beautiful women flocked to be his. Of all men, he was the mightiest. Of all gods, he was the greatest."

Last edited by David Mosley; 06-29-2006 at 04:35 PM.
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Old 07-01-2006, 08:01 PM
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I, for one, am so very grateful for your efforts here, David.
I now have another reference to bring with me to bookstores. I am a bit confused, and this helps a lot.
For instance, now I know that I can finish The Wrecks of Time when I get The Rituals Of Infinity
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Character, like a photograph, develops in darkness.
-Yousuf Karsh
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Old 07-02-2006, 01:32 AM
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I realise that I've missed out 'The Mystery of the Texas Twister', a slim-bound Seaton Begg novella that was published with Argosy #1 a couple of years ago. Hmm, it kinda the same format as 'Jade Man's Eyes', but it wasn't available to buy separately. So, where to put it? In the books section (making the total 100?) or in the pamphlets section? It doesn't feel like a pamphlet to me (not flimsy enough) but you're not going to be able to pick it up in Borders or Waterstones...*

Thoughts anyone?

*You can still order Argosy #1 from www.coppervaleinternational.com though .

ETA: I've added it to the list for the time being.
___________________________________________________________________________
_"For an eternity Allard was alone in an icy limbo where all the colours were bright and sharp and comfortless.
_For another eternity Allard swam through seas without end, all green and cool and deep, where distorted creatures drifted, sometimes attacking him.
_And then, at last, he had reached the real world – the world he had created, where he was God and could create or destroy whatever he wished.
_He was supremely powerful. He told planets to destroy themselves, and they did. He created suns. Beautiful women flocked to be his. Of all men, he was the mightiest. Of all gods, he was the greatest."

Last edited by David Mosley; 07-04-2006 at 04:15 AM.
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Old 07-04-2006, 02:18 AM
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Another question: Carribean Crisis - what format was this published in? Square-bound (like 'Science Fantasy'/'New Worlds') or stapled (ie magazine)?

Reason I ask, is I'm thinking that it should probably go in the 'Pamphlet' section, but not having (yet*) seen a copy I don't know for certain.

*I'm currently bidding on a copy of CC on eBay, so hopefully I might be able to plug another gap in my Moorcock collection in due course.

ETA: I'm omitting it from the list for the time being. :)
___________________________________________________________________________
_"For an eternity Allard was alone in an icy limbo where all the colours were bright and sharp and comfortless.
_For another eternity Allard swam through seas without end, all green and cool and deep, where distorted creatures drifted, sometimes attacking him.
_And then, at last, he had reached the real world – the world he had created, where he was God and could create or destroy whatever he wished.
_He was supremely powerful. He told planets to destroy themselves, and they did. He created suns. Beautiful women flocked to be his. Of all men, he was the mightiest. Of all gods, he was the greatest."

Last edited by David Mosley; 07-04-2006 at 04:15 AM.
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Old 07-04-2006, 05:09 AM
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lemec lemec is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by David Mosley
Another question: Carribean Crisis - what format was this published in? Square-bound (like 'Science Fantasy'/'New Worlds') or stapled (ie magazine)?

Reason I ask, is I'm thinking that it should probably go in the 'Pamphlet' section, but not having (yet*) seen a copy I don't know for certain.

*I'm currently bidding on a copy of CC on eBay, so hopefully I might be able to plug another gap in my Moorcock collection in due course.

ETA: I'm omitting it from the list for the time being. :)

I have seen it listed as a novel, but I don't know if it is in book form.

addition: from Sweet Despise:

Quote:
Caribbean Crisis is Michael Moorcock's first published novel, a volume in the Sexton Blake library, little more than a chapbook. It has become a rarity that is very difficult to track down and can sell for anything up to $100. A collaboration with Jim Cawthorn, that was revised by the editor of the series in which it appeared.

This link shows it as having 14 chapters.


http://www.eclipse.co.uk/sweetdespis...k/crisis1.html


A Caribbean Crisis (1962) as Desmond Reid -a pseudonyme I had missed...

Last edited by lemec; 07-04-2006 at 05:12 AM.
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Old 07-04-2006, 05:27 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lemec
A Caribbean Crisis (1962) as Desmond Reid -a pseudonyme I had missed...
Desmond Reid was an 'in-house' pseudonym for the Sexton Blake Library, which means there are other writers whose work appeared with the Reid byline. As such, it's not normally countered as a 'proper' Moorcock pseudonym, like James Colvin - although not all Colvin credited work is by Moorcock either.

(Feeling confused? You will be.)
___________________________________________________________________________
_"For an eternity Allard was alone in an icy limbo where all the colours were bright and sharp and comfortless.
_For another eternity Allard swam through seas without end, all green and cool and deep, where distorted creatures drifted, sometimes attacking him.
_And then, at last, he had reached the real world – the world he had created, where he was God and could create or destroy whatever he wished.
_He was supremely powerful. He told planets to destroy themselves, and they did. He created suns. Beautiful women flocked to be his. Of all men, he was the mightiest. Of all gods, he was the greatest."
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Old 07-04-2006, 05:35 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by David Mosley
Desmond Reid was an 'in-house' pseudonym for the Sexton Blake Library, which means there are other writers whose work appeared with the Reid byline. As such, it's not normally countered as a 'proper' Moorcock pseudonym, like James Colvin - although not all Colvin credited work is by Moorcock either.

(Feeling confused? You will be.)

yep, haha :)


and speaking of prefered titles:

Quote:
Warlords of Mars
1 Warriors of Mars (1965)
Variant Title: City of the Beast (1965)
Variant Title: Warriors of Mars (1965) [as by Edward P. Bradbury ]
2 Blades of Mars (1965)
Variant Title: Lord of the Spiders (1965)
Variant Title: Blades of Mars (1965) [as by Edward P. Bradbury ]
3 Barbarians of Mars (1965)
Variant Title: Masters of the Pit (1965)
Variant Title: Barbarians of Mars (1965) [as by Edward P. Bradbury
I guess the chosen ones are?:

City of the Beast
Lord of the Spiders
Masters of the Pit
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Old 07-06-2007, 01:00 PM
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this is great but let's face it the multiverse it's characters stories and themes is ever so confusing, and that's the way it should be...
I have an edition of the first part of the elric saga, but it's upstairs and I'm too lazy to reference it, and the publisher takes pains to list the eternel champion stories IN CHRONOLOGICAL ORDER!!!!
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